unsquare walls and tiling question

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Old 01-02-09, 12:24 PM
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unsquare walls and tiling question

I have a tile in shower stall question. I did a search but couldn’t find a question similar to mine. The entire shower will not be tile. I have a fiberglass shower stall, and was thinking about tiling from the ceiling down to the stall. Two area’s 24” h x 36” w (front of shower) and 36” h x 72” w (side of shower) This sounds like a great project for me and as I was researching and planning I figured out where these two walls join together is not a 90 degree angle in one part. Hard to describe, but if you are standing in the shower...the wall on your left starts out square at the ceiling, but as you go lower toward the shower stall...it bows out a bit as compared to the front wall. This kind of scared me off of my project a bit...how can I compensate for this?

Any helpful hints would be greatly appreciated...thanks in advance.
 
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Old 01-02-09, 05:01 PM
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Hi!

Could you take a picture of the area and upload the image to a photosharing site, like photobucket or flicker? You would then need to paste the IMG url back here in a post.
 
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Old 01-02-09, 08:36 PM
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Thanks for the reply. Good idea about the pictures. It is pretty hard to explain. I hope these pictures help. Basically...the vertical line between the two walls isn't straight. In picture number two with the angle might show things the best. If that angle was a 4" x 4" tile..the gap between the wall and the tile would be different and nothing would look square?

Actually picture number two makes it look worse than it really is...

http://www.megalink.net/~ampd/shower...20wall%201.jpg

http://www.megalink.net/~ampd/shower...20wall%202.jpg
 
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Old 01-02-09, 08:45 PM
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Thanks for the pics! I see your issue now!

I would rip that out and put new drywall there. Shimming any studs to make it all nice and plumb. It won't be that difficult.

There's no amount of thinset that would make up for that wall.

Looks like someone had to many Beer 4U2 when they were installing that.
 
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Old 01-03-09, 07:18 AM
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thanks for the input. I was thinking someone would say the best thing to do would be to put up new drywall. Honestly I have never done that before so I guess I will start researching that now!
 
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Old 01-03-09, 07:28 AM
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spackle the corner to make it square ,,its no big deal
 
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Old 01-03-09, 07:34 AM
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Not worth spackling. Drywall is pretty easy to do. I was intimidated my first time doing drywall, but it wasn't difficult at all too do. Just get a hammer and start pulling it out.
 
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Old 01-03-09, 08:15 PM
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maybe this is off the subject fir this thread, but do you think a moisture resistant drywall or "greenboard" would be a sufficient replacement to then put my tile on afterward? Or should I get some special board to put the tile on?
 
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Old 01-04-09, 08:04 AM
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It's up to you. Since this area is above the shower head, it won't be seeing direct water exposure. You can use a 1/2" cement board if you'd like, it's just harder to cut.
 
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Old 01-05-09, 12:11 PM
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Oh goodness! I'm sorry to hear of your problems with your curved wall. I too had this exact same problem and it was explained to me that when the drywall was installed the installers allowed the drywall to curve over the existing flange that is made on to the shower wall. I understand this is a poor job and not the way it should have been done. Oh well, not everyone is perfect I guess.

I wonder if you were to apply your tile to the back wall first fit nicely into the corners if you couldn't then apply the tile on the sidewalls and just let it curve to follow the wall. It wouldn't look any worse than it does now and you wouldn't have to remove your walls.

As I think this thru I think shimming the studs if you were to remove the wall board would be the worst thing you could do because how would the rest of the wall match anything? I was told about that option also but I realized it was a mindless suggestion from a well-meaning friend.
 
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Old 01-05-09, 03:20 PM
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As I think this thru I think shimming the studs if you were to remove the wall board would be the worst thing you could do because how would the rest of the wall match anything?
Huh?

What do you mean match anything else? The wall is going to be tiled.....and needs a FLAT surface. Shimming studs and installing drywall is not a hard task.
 
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Old 01-05-09, 05:32 PM
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Huh?

What do you mean match anything else?
I think you must be assuming the shower sits in an alcove and I have two that do not. My walls continue on across away from the shower. In my case for me to have shimmed the wallboard to accommodate the shower I would have been shimming about twenty feet of walls beyond the shower.

The pictures are close up and really don't show the real case.
 
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Old 01-07-09, 06:09 AM
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This definitely isn't shimming twenty feet of dry wall. The shower head is on front wall and that is the end of the wall. If that makes any sense. We are literally talking about a four feet (at max) section of dry wall and it is only the corner where the left wall meets the front wall that bows at the bottom.

And sorry about the close up pictures. When standing in a shower stall...you can't exactly back up. And pictures from the side were too hard to see what I was trying to show.
 
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