Re-caulk/re-grout shower pan and tile help... (pic)

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Old 04-03-09, 06:49 AM
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Re-caulk/re-grout shower pan and tile help... (pic)

Hello all - we have a 4 year old home. Last year around this time, we re-sealed the seam between our shower pan and the tile because the original seam became quite moldy. We stripped the original seam and then cleaned thoroughly with bleach. After drying, we re-applied a silicone for shower/bath from Dap. We then let it dry for a week before using. However, the newly applied silicone is probably more moldy today than what we replaced last year - leading me to believe we did something wrong, or used the wrong product. Here is a pic from today:



Should we have used grout instead of silicone? What exact steps should we follow to do this job correctly?

Thanks!
 
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Old 04-21-09, 02:40 PM
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Just wanted to follow up on this post... can anyone provide any guidance?

Thanks again!
 
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Old 04-21-09, 05:09 PM
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Hmmm, I must have overlooked this thread. Sorry about that.

I would completely remove all the bad caulking and clean thoroughly and allow to completely dry, at least 48hrs, before applying a new bead of silicone.

Do you remember how that tub was constructed, i.e. what are the tiles bonded too, etc?
 
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Old 04-22-09, 01:10 PM
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Yup, we're suspecting the walls are saturated because of wrong materials used or bad methods, probably both. (they often go together).

The new caulk trapped moisture from escaping and now it shows. Silicone caulk would probably make it even worse.

Jaz
 
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Old 08-08-09, 12:31 PM
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Thanks both for the responses (I was not subscribed to the thread, so I just now stumbled onto them!)

To answer your question(s) - I am not sure what the tiles are bonded to. Based on our overall experience with our home-builder, it would not surprise me if they followed incorrect methods anywhere/everywhere. With that said, I do have a couple of follow up questions.

We are planning on removing all of the caulk/silicone - once we do, what should we use to clean it? Once cleaned, how long would you recommend allowing it to completely dry (48 hours ok)? Lastly, once dried, what would you recommend sealing it with (silicone the best choice)?

Thanks again for all of the help!
 
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Old 08-08-09, 12:43 PM
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Hi!

Just scrub it with some bleach and water, allow to dry completely (48hrs should be good), and reseal with 100% silicone.

100% silicone is a little more of a pain in the rear to work with, but it's better. They do have color matching, so you might have to look around for it.
 
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Old 08-09-09, 07:16 AM
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if you can get behind that wall = cut a hole in the bedroom wall, for example. and inspect from behind. i would do that. you may be fighting a lost battle.

btw. our builder wasn't so goo, either. lots of cheap crap and poor workmanship.
 
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Old 08-10-09, 05:47 AM
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Just recaulking might not help. You need to find out whats going on there. Whats behind the tile. If its drywall instead of cement board, its likely saturated and will never dry out. All you'll be doing is traping moisture behind the caulk, and you already know what that looks like after a short period of time. Cut a whole in the wall from the back as condo suggested and see what you have there.
 
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Old 05-09-10, 04:07 PM
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Thanks again for the replies all - I have finally dug in and researched this further. I think I am battling multiple issues. After close examination, it does appear that I have a bunch of small cracks in the grout (some larger than others). In addition, I found out that I caulked over the shower pan weep holes last time around - essentially trapping the water that did make it through the cracks in the grout.

My follow up question is I realize I need to re-grout some areas - and I am just trying to determine what needs re-grouted versus maybe what just needs to be re-sealed...

Here are some example pics:





For the larger grout cracks, should I just patch that area, or regrout the entire joint? What type of grout should I use? Some of the info on the web indicates not to use the premixed stuff in shower stalls. Also, how should I go about matching the existing grout? I recall the color name is Bone - but I have no idea who the manufacturer of the original grout is.

Thanks again!
 
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Old 05-09-10, 07:10 PM
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As evidenced by the second picture I would say you have more problems that caulk can fix. You have lots of movements back there. Did you ever discover what's behind the tiles? My guess is that you have either wallboard or green board and it is wet.

Grout has very little flex. Caulk will flex to a point. Any repair you do will likely be a band aid.

Jaz
 
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Old 05-12-10, 08:24 AM
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Thanks for the response JazMan - that 2nd pic is the worst of it... most grout shows no cracking at all.

I did not see the backing material first hand... but the builder is NVHomes (Ryan) - and I would be surprised if they didn't use the correct backer board material, as these houses are so cookie-cutter. Then again - maybe I wouldn't be surprised!
 
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Old 05-12-10, 10:36 AM
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My guess is that you have either wallboard or green board and it is wet.
Yep, me thinks so as well.

Any repair you do will likely be a band aid.
Yep

I found this website, full of complaints about NVHomes. Maybe some info here about your shower construction.

Ryan Homes @ Pissed Consumer
 
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Old 05-13-10, 04:54 AM
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Thanks for the response HeresJohnny...

I do not have access to this wall from the rear (the exterior of the house is behind it). So should I pull up one of these decorator tiles (there are 2 that show this level of grout cracking)?
 
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Old 08-09-10, 09:17 AM
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Quick update - I wound up re-grouting the porous sections, and re-caulked the surround while leaving the wheep holes open this time. Will provide an update in a year to let you all know how it works out.

Thanks again for all of the suggestions!
 
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