Cove Base Tile install, Advice Needed

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Old 10-18-09, 06:18 PM
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Cove Base Tile install, Advice Needed

Hello all,

I'd like some advice regarding the installation of cove base tile in a bathroom. I want to install just a single row of cove base tiles and NO wall tiles. The floor has just been tiled. What do I need to know before I start?

Some of my concerns are:

How to I make sure that the cove base will be level,( even if the floor isn't level)

Should I set the cove base directly on the floor or should I leave a space between the floor and cove base? What's the minimum and maximum space allowable?

Should I set a chalk line before I start, to assure that the top edge of the cove base is level?

If I leave a space between the floor and the cove base, what should I use to fill it: grout, latex caulk or silicone sealant?

Where on the wall is the best place to start setting the cove base; corner, middle of wall??

On another forum they were discussing installing cove base tiles with a thin lip installation vs a flush installation. What are these types of installations?

thanks for your help, mike
 
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Old 10-19-09, 06:01 PM
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Mike,

The keyword is "flat" not level. Level would be nice to have too though. If the floor isn't flat, now is no time to think about flat, it should have been addressed prior to setting the floor tiles. You can however tweek the base as much as 1/8" if you run over a slight low spot.

I generally go off the floor and leave a slight gap 1/16-1/8"), for the siliconized acrylic caulk that matches the grout. I usually use pieces of the box the tiles came in for spacing.

I usually determine the number of pieces on each wall, but try to start full at the most visible corner. If there's an outside corner, of course start there with the special outside corner base piece.

I think I saw that other thread at one of the other forums? Your floor is already installed, so you will be using sanitary base which has a tapered toe. We don't use that much any more since it generally is only available in a limited choice of colors to match standard wall tiles. I usually cut the floor tiles into 3.5" pieces to use as base since since we use larger tiles on floors.

Definitely can't use this;
http://www.cincausa.com/images/5500-10x20RC.jpg


Jaz
 
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Old 10-20-09, 04:29 PM
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jazman thank you for those tips. Yes, you're correct the floor tile is already done. So, is it sanitary base tile that I'll be using as opposed to cove base tile? Which ever it is, I'll be using the base tile where the toe sits above the floor and not flush with the floor. Also, can you give me an answer to this question. When I removed the old cove base, the mastic tore off a layer of the drywall paper and also loosened the paper around the tear. How meticulous do I have to be when removing this torn drywall paper. Obviously, I can't set the cove base on loose drywall paper, but once I start removing the loose pieces of paper, it becomes a very slippery slope and you could end up removing all the paper. It seems that when drywall paper gets torn, the surrounding paper is not all that secure and when you start removing it, it's hard to know where to stop. Thanks again, Mike
 
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Old 10-20-09, 07:31 PM
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I've had that happen many times too. You need to be very careful with the paper by using a sharp putty knife and a utility knife and cut the paper with downward strokes. Do not grab the paper and peel it. The board is very fragile down there any way. Don't try to remove all the loose pieces.

Jaz
 
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Old 10-21-09, 09:08 AM
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Jazman, I not entire sure what you mean when you say "cut the paper with downward strokes"

Should I remove any and all paper that has separated from the drywall? I think the best way to do this is to use a razor knife to score the paper a little beyond where the paper is separated (where it is still attached to the drywall) so that when you remove the loose paper it won't continue to peel off the paper that is still attached. My concern is that the paper that is not separated from the drywall and is still attached, seams to peel off very easily. Should I be concerned with this or will the cove base still bond tothe wall good enough?

thanks mike
 
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