Kitchen Floor Planning.

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Old 07-01-10, 07:13 AM
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Kitchen Floor Planning.

Hi All,
I have a kitchen that currently has vinyl on top of a wood sub floor. What im thinking is putting down the a cement backer board or a wonderboard. Now im guessing there would be a portland thinset below the board trowled in. Whats the consistency of the Thinset? Peanut Butter?
What would be a better idea. To take up all the base cabinets and tile the whole kitchen or around the cabinets? I would like to do the whole kitchen but the Mrs dosent want to.
 
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Old 07-01-10, 08:29 AM
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You should remove the vinyl, and any 1/4" underlayments (plywood, particle board, luan, etc) under the vinyl. Then tell us what you have for a subfloor. Also, give details on your floor joists, as to size, unsupported span, on center spacing and wood species if known.

If you already have base cabinets in place, I'd not go thru the trouble of removing and reinstalling them.
 
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Old 07-01-10, 09:22 AM
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bklynjames; peanut butter and it's more to just make sure that it stick. Make sure you use screws and in required area. Make sure you have clearance with the dish washer, compactor, and fridge.
 
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Old 07-01-10, 08:18 PM
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AZ girl,

Are you suggesting the thin set is there to help the backer board stick?

James,

Peanut butter-like is fine for setting the tiles. You can make the thin set a little thinner for the board. It's not that critical, just do it consistently or you may create ridges at the seams.

Start by removing the underlayment and vinyl then report back with what Johnny asked.

Jaz
 
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Old 07-03-10, 01:21 AM
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JazMan,

Our business installed all types of flooring and when it came to tile, we always followed the manufactures instruction to eliminate warranty issues in the future. Here's a link I pulled up and the section below.

HARDIBACKER INSTALLATION GUIDE Hardibacker Installation Instructions also available in

Attach HARDIBACKER sheets to subfloor

Apply a minimum of 3/32" thick dry-set mortar or modified thinset to subfloor.
Embed HARDIBACKER sheets firmly and evenly in the wet mortar. Leave 1/8" gap between sheet edges.
Using the printed dots as a guide, fasten HARDIBACKER sheets with proper nails or screws (as listed in "Materials Required") every 8" over the entire surface. Keep the fasteners between 3/8" and 3/4" from sheet edges and 2" in from sheet corners.
Set fastener heads flush with the surface without overdriving.
 
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Old 07-03-10, 07:30 AM
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Jaz was just saying the thinset is there to fill any voids under the cement board so there will not be any flexing, not to secure the hardie.
 
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Old 07-03-10, 01:31 PM
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HotinOKC - Jaz was just saying the thinset is there to fill any voids under the cement board so there will not be any flexing, not to secure the hardie.

JazMan - Are you suggesting the thin set is there to help the backer board stick?

Man HotinOKC, you are better at reading between the lines than I am. When I read "stick", my interpretation was exactly that. I try not to "assume" what someone else has stated.

Regarding the voids, we would float or skim coat areas that were uneven enough to cause an issue, not rely on the mortar. We would also go around and check for squeaks and movement.

Thanks HotinOKC!!
 
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Old 07-03-10, 06:19 PM
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Checking for squeaks and movement is standard procedure. Many of us re-screw/screwnail every joist regardless if it squeaks or not. You can have slight invisible movement and no squeaks, plus it can all change with the seasons.

Floating dips is also necessary and has nothing to do with the need for thin set under the CBU. Even if the floor was perfectly flat, the board will have voids and therefore move creating problems down the road.

Jaz
 
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Old 07-21-10, 01:57 AM
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I think so wood floor is better then the hard cement floor .
 
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Old 07-21-10, 06:01 AM
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Originally Posted by naters View Post
I think so wood floor is better then the hard cement floor .

huh? ....................
 
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Old 07-21-10, 09:37 AM
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Many of us re-screw/screwnail every joist regardless if it squeaks or not.
Yep, its the only way I know if the subfloor is properly secured to the joists. I'll not depend on work that was done in the past by contractors I dont know. This is an important step. If I didnt do it, then it aint done right.
 
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