How To Build Up The Floor For Tile..

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Old 09-06-10, 01:28 PM
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How To Build Up The Floor For Tile..

The hardwood just inside the front door entry in my home was buckled and creaking everywhere. Former roof leak (before we moved in) has destroyed 50% of this room. The room is approximately 17' X 11'. My wife & I pulled up all of the hardwood this morning. Under the hard-wood the only thing we found were sections of 2X4 laid perpendicular to the hardwood. The 2X4's were laid directly on top of the foundation which had black tar applied to it as a vapor barrier????

Anyway, now that the flooring is all gone, I need to raise this area up so that when I lay my tile, it will be level with the 3 other rooms that adjoin it.

I am dealing with a 2-7/8's" difference. The floor is NO WHERE NEAR LEVEL. The slab itself has peaks & valleys all over it.

How would you guys recommend filling up the gap to get close to where I can lay a sand/mortar bed as a surface on which to lay thin-set & then finally the tile? Since there is tar on top of the slab, will I need to add any additional type of vapor barrier?

I really do not want to try and fill the entire area with sand/mortar mix to build it up if I can avoid it. That is a LOT of mixing, and then I have not had good luck getting that stuff level enough. I was hoping I could lay either OSB, plywood, or backer board down on top of a thin bed of sand/mortar mix to try and level, and build up, the floor simultaneously. Then on top of that I would put another leveling layer of sand/mortar mix, then self-leveling compound (if necessary), then thin-set & tile.

Thanks in advance for your time!
 
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Old 09-06-10, 04:27 PM
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Hello!

Can you double check what you have for floor joists? I don't think it was ever legal to have 2x4's as a joist.
 
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Old 09-06-10, 04:59 PM
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Unless this is sleeper system on a slab, I agree with Mark. If is is a slab with sleepers, you'll have to start over with sleepers and make sure they are level regardless of what the slab is doing. You'll have to shim the sleepers to make sure they stay straight.
 
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Old 09-06-10, 07:11 PM
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69 said the floor is a slab.

You can concoct another floor using sleepers like you removed, but that is not a good way to install a floor. Eventually the thing is gonna rot.

This floor needs a good old fashioned mud base. You may want to hire it done though.

Jaz
 
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Old 09-07-10, 11:17 AM
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Yes, this is the actual slab, or foundation, that the sleepers were laid on top of. Now I see why the hardwood was not level even before the water damage. The slab was not level, and the sleepers (2 ft sections of 2X4) were just following the peaks & valleys. There were no shims under, or on top of, any of the sleepers. They basically just threw them down on the tar and slammed the hard-wood right over it.

I guess I'll make this a month-long project instead of a weekend. I'll go home tonight and start mixing up sand/mortar mix. If I do 2 pours a night, I should have it done in about 18 days. Oh joy!

I can't sub the job out because I can't afford to pay someone to do the work. I guess time is on my side as we were planning on flipping this house, and the market is so bad right now that I have plenty of time to get it done..

On a positive note, the last post I made before this one was about installing a laminate beam. That job is over-and it went fantastically well. You'd think a pro did it... But it was just me.Beer 4U2

We've been keeping pictures of all "before" & "after" work that we plan on making a slide-show out of. When potential buyers come to look at the house, we'll have the slide-show playing on all TV's throughout the house. I don't know if that will interest a potential buyer or not, but hopefully so. I'll have to ask my real estate agent if that is a good idea or not.
 
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Old 09-07-10, 05:18 PM
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Figure the cost of the bags of concrete and mixer, then call a local concrete delivery service and see what the difference in cost would be. You don't want to do jagged pours. One pour, smooth floor.
 
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Old 09-08-10, 08:32 AM
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Chandler appreciate the idea, but I can't afford the sand & mortar mix right this minute... So I know I can't afford to have a concrete company come in and do the work.

I agree it would be better to pour it all at once but just like the bathrooms-I'll have to break it up into sections. On the bathrooms, I would taper off the edge of a pour so that the next pour I started would over-lap the pour from the day before. After doing an area in sections, I learned to leave the joint between two pours lower so that I could go back and fill them in with SLC. Might not look pretty, but once the tile goes down you'll never see it.

When I say I have no money right now.. Well, I work at a job that is 100% commission and I have not seen a customer in almost 2 weeks. No customers-no pay. I think the renovation is going to have to stop until I figure out what I am going to do about work. According to Obama the economy is rebounding.. Maybe the "people" aren't getting the message?

If anyone knows of a job available in Houston, I'm all ears. I'm a GREAT mechanic, and hobbyist carpenter. I can lay tile, hang sheet-rock, tape & float, do plumbing & electrical work. On the mechanical side I presently rebuild engines, transmissions, differentials, transfer-cases, and can do any type of basic repairs (tune-ups, timing belts, re-seal work, etc. I'll take anything that pays decent at this time...
 
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Old 09-21-10, 05:56 PM
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In the words of Jethro Bodine.

I have no idea what you just said Miss Jane
 
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Old 09-21-10, 06:41 PM
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You know......the F number. It's a secret number used in floating floors or fixing lift gates on trucks. Gee, sometimes I wonder.
 
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Old 09-22-10, 08:09 AM
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and here I thought the F-number was simply a count of how many times I dropped the "F"bomb while working on this project.

I'm up to about 2,468,793 at this time.. Does that number meet the requirements????????
 
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