Advice on Penthouse concrete roof / deck repair ???

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Old 01-09-11, 10:05 PM
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Advice on Penthouse concrete roof / deck repair ???

My wife and I are moving back to Seoul and have secured a penthouse in Seoul. We will have exclusive access to the deck area (Pictures:DecPics) but you can see that it is in poor repair. The elements have left the concrete chipped and stained. It needs some work.

I don't have much experience with home repair but I'm willing to do research and hard work. We want to use this area for weekend lounging, parties, and exercise. So I'd like it to be some kind of rubberish, non-slippery, waterproof, easy to clean finish that would be resistant to impacts. People have mentioned a type of compound that you sprinkle sand or plastic shards onto for traction. That sounds good to me. But if that's too expensive ... maybe just some concrete repair and then some kind of paint. We're just renting the place.

I've done some preliminary research. Watching videos on youtube and visiting acrylic membrane retailers etc ... but I haven't found much that seems relevant to what I'd like to do. So.

- Could you guys give me an attack plan for a project like this?
- Are there any primers, sealants, or products that I should check out?
- Any estimates on total cost / hours of labor?
- I'd like to do it myself if possible but would I be in over my head as a newb?

Sorry that I can't give exact measurements for the area.

DecPics

Thanks for reading my post ... any recommendations will be greatly appreciated.
 
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Old 01-10-11, 05:17 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

This isn't my area of expertise so take my advice/thoughts with a grain of salt and stay tuned for more advice

The concrete needs to be repaired before you do anything else! That would involve cleaning and removing any loose material. You would then likely need to apply a bonding agent and trowel on the repair material [possibly portlant cement] After that dries/cures you can apply a variety of products for beautification.

Don't forget you should clear all work to be done with the landlord first
 
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Old 01-10-11, 07:27 AM
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Adding to Marksr's comments, you may opt for building deck panels of pressure treated wood. Is this concrete, or a waterproof membrane that is exposed? Concrete may allow that, but if it is a membrane, then you may have to resort to replacing, or repairing the membrane.
 
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Old 01-10-11, 12:47 PM
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If it is a membrane you can't put anything directly on top of it.
Normal practice is to use sleepers designed for that purpose or for a more temporary installation pieces of waterproof Styrofoam, like type SM.
 
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Old 01-10-11, 01:11 PM
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Hi Nathan,

I agree with Mark. Remove any loose stuff then power wash. Use a portland based patching material that is made for your purpose and conditions. Pay attention to the max thickness guide.

Evaluate the choices available to you there. Do not paint as it'll peel in a short time. Concrete stain is a better choice. Waterproofing is a waste of time as waterproofing is applied under the concrete, not on the surface. Does the roof leak? By all means you will need prior written approval from the landlord.

Congrats on your lifestyle and your worldly adventures. Have fun, both of you.

OH, tell Rachel I am from Michigan and I do not hold her snide comment against her. :NO NO NO: Maybe one day soon University of Michigan will return to it's legendary greatness in football, although they are still the school with the most wins of all Universities, Notre Dame is # 2. It sure was fun when we had to wait until the last Saturday of the season to see whether Michigan or Ohio State was the Big 10 champ.

I was very happy that THE Ohio State U won their bowl game last week. Actually I favor Michigan State most of the time. Good luck.

Jaz
 
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Old 01-10-11, 01:20 PM
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Thanks

Thanks for the replies:

Marksr: When you say "clean the concrete" ... Are you thinking that I should powerwash it ... maybe get a wetvac in there after that? Or would I need to do something more labor intensive ... Sanding? ... scraping?

Chandler: Wood is uber expensive in Seoul because it's in such high demand for flooring due to their use of radiant heat. The deck is concrete ... there has never been a sealant as far as I can tell.
 
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Old 01-10-11, 01:32 PM
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Jazman: Thanks for checking out our website Rachel got a laugh out of that.

Good advice. I think that we'll just vac it, powerwash it, and then try to patch it up. I've read on a couple other sites that I may need to "paint" a thin concrete solvent that acts as a primer between the old and new materials. Do any of you have experience with this? I want the repairs to last.

So it sounds like I'll need a bucket, trowel, maybe a drill with mixing bit? and make sure I don't make the mixture to thick?

I'm also worried that if I don't put the patching material over the entire surface .... is it going to look "patchy"? Different shades of concrete. Will a stain blend out the differences?

Thanks again for all your help!
 
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Old 01-10-11, 02:29 PM
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Some, if not all patching products require a primer. You can "paint" it on, but that does not make it paint. There's many products in the world and I can't read Korean to know what's available there.

make sure I don't make the mixture to thick?
Actually too thin is normally worse than too thick. However you need to follow directions to a T. If you choose a self-leveling, it is very thin though.

I'm also worried that if I don't put the patching material over the entire surface .... is it going to look "patchy"? Different shades of concrete. Will a stain blend out the differences?
Yes of course it will. The new stain will help blend it, but you'll still see the different colors and textures. You can apply a 1/4" coating and texture it or make designs like bricks or stones. That's a different animal altogether.

Go to this sight, they make all kinds of products that you need. Ardex.com

Jaz
 
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Old 01-10-11, 06:41 PM
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"When you say "clean the concrete" ... Are you thinking that I should powerwash it ... maybe get a wetvac in there after that? Or would I need to do something more labor intensive ... Sanding? ... scraping?"

The surface needs to be clean before anything is applied to it! that includes dirt, grime and any loose material. Assuming you just have dirty weathered concrete [no coatings/coverings] a pressure washer along with a cleaning agent would be the quickest way BUT you need to make sure the PWer doesn't cause problems by forcing water where it shouldn't be. Not sure that you can determine that without being onsite.... but a little common sense goes a long way
 
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