Hardwood out, Heated tile in???

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Old 02-01-11, 07:41 AM
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Hardwood out, Heated tile in???

Guys,

I have an finished breezeway between the garage and kitchen. It is heated, finished, and the floor is a relatively cheap hardwood. Over the past few years, the floor has been beat up with snow, water, dirt etc as it is the main entry and exit to the house.

I need to replace the front door, and when I do that I was thinking about replacing the floor near the door, as it shows water damage from when we did not have gutters and/or proper drainage above the doorway...

I'm starting to think that If I pull a few boards, I might as well pull them all and install tile, as it would be more appropriate for the entryway.

If I did so, I would want to heat the tile, either by electric, or through the hydronic heat system. I have two baseboards in the breezeway that I could tap into...

Assuming the construction is sound, joist are 16"OC and span about 10X10, what am I looking at for the install?

I've read enough on here to know the basics of the install, but I am more curious about using the hybronic system to heat the tile, if possible? If not, what is the maximum area I could heat with electric mats and how much energy do the mats consume?

Anyone care to teach me a few things about heating tile floors?

Thanks,

Bryan
 
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Old 02-01-11, 10:01 AM
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Radiant can be cost-effective but I've seen some outrageous usage costs with the electric mats
 
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Old 02-01-11, 03:07 PM
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If you tap into the hydronic system to warm the floor, it will contribute to warming the breezeway. Electric tile warmers are just for that, warming the tiles. If you attempt to use them as (supplemental) room heaters, you will spend an extraodinary amount of money on your electric bill without reaping any benefit.

tldoug
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Old 02-01-11, 06:00 PM
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Given I would be installing on a prebuilt subfloor, my only option would be to use the under floor heating system, correct? Also, I assume I would need a seperate zone for the floor, complete with mixer valve, to control the water temp to the floor, correct?

I don't think running 200F water as with the rest of the houses hydronic would be good for tile....

Thoughts?

Bryan
 
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