How badly was my tile to carpet transition installed?

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Old 02-24-11, 01:38 PM
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How badly was my tile to carpet transition installed?

I have a lot of carpet to tile transistions in my home. The space between the tile and the trim piece looks horrible because it has lost most of the grout and in some places I doubt that it had it in the first place. I think there are trim pieces that slope down to lower areas like carpet, and that is not the kind that was used. We have to watch where we step because it hurts to step there with bare feet. The tack strip for the carpet is installed 5/16" away from the trim piece. It just seems like there is a big gap and that is one of the reasons that it is uncomfortable to walk on. There are also a few nails sticking out in some places.

We bought the house new and we are having trouble with the home builder's warranty. The grout in the master bathroom started to crack and tiles were loose so we called him up and he sent some guys to fix it. They replaced a few tiles and put new grout in, and then spread the grout over the old dirty grout of the whole bathroom. It was not the same color of grout and so it looked kind of striped when they wiped it down. It started to crack again immediately of course and so they came back and replaced several tiles but I complained about the stripes so they just regrouted the tiles they replaced and didn't spread it out. It is a few months later and it has started to crack again and the home builder said it is probably a weak spot in the floor that is between two supports and he will have them come back and use epoxy grout.

I really doubt that this is going to fix it. I really take pride and enjoy working on my home, and I think that I could to a way better job doing it myself.

Should I move the carpet tack strips closer to the trim piece? Install carpet shims?

I want to scrape out all of the grout and put new grout in. If I really get it into the gap between the tile and trim piece will it stay?

Thank you in advance.
 
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Old 02-24-11, 02:10 PM
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Welcome to the forums!! When working with flooring, you always move from hard to soft. That way, transitions aren't such a booger. Once your tile was in, the carpet should have been laid and a bull nose type transition used to define where the tile ended and the carpet began. Grout won't stay between the gap of the carpet and tile, so forget that. And any qualified tile person would never have done that. I am concerned with the loose tiles. If you have any more, pull the tile and scratch down into the thinset they used to set the tile with. Tell us what you see. Options are 1) concrete backer unerlayment, 2) a pinkish orange grid pattern with thinset on it, or sadly 3) plywood. If you pick door number 3, then the tile guys have to come back and do the entire job over and do it right.
We will await your response on this.
Oh post some pix if you like so we can see what you see. http://forum.doityourself.com/electr...your-post.html
 
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Old 02-24-11, 03:33 PM
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The first picture shows the tile meeting the trim piece without any grout missing, and how the tack strip has nails pointed upward.



The second picture shows what the carpet looks like along the tile. You can see a gap and it looks really bad. You can also see that the trim piece was installed a lot closer to the tile than in the first picture.




The third picture shows how the grout between the tile and the trim has been breaking away.



I know that the tile has been installed on concrete backer board on top of plywood.
 
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Old 02-24-11, 06:32 PM
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I'm not a carpet installer, but it looks as if the carpet could have been doubled at the selveged end for a thicker transition and the tack strip pulled back a little. I am assuming the carpet was done after the tile, but that doesn't explain the grout between the tile and the strip. There should be no grout in that line. If anything it needs an expandable colored caulking to prevent cracking if the tile was done second.
Do you know what they used for setting your tile? Is there a bag of it left lying around? I hate to ask so many questions, but we need to know.
 
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Old 02-26-11, 08:28 AM
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Loose tile is usually an installer problem. Could be, that the installer used the wrong thinset, used thinset that was out of its shelf life, allowed the thinset to skin over, or possibly some other things.

It is a few months later and it has started to crack again and the home builder said it is probably a weak spot in the floor that is between two supports and he will have them come back and use epoxy grout.
Cracked grout could simply be a result of the loose tile. Or, it could be excessive movement of the floor framing and or subfloor. If the tiles have been reinstalled, and they are not loose, and the grout is still cracking, you likely have excessive vertical movement in the floor. Epoxy grout isn't going to fix that.

As to the trim piece for the tile, they come in different sizes. The correct size for your tile is a trim piece of which the top of the trim would be slightly lower than the tile itself. In your pictures, the trim piece looks slightly higher instead of lower. I have used similar trim pieces to the one you have their from a company name Schluter. Their instructions say to grout the joint between the tile and the trim piece. I have always used a matching sanded caulk instead but I'm sure the grout if installed correctly would hold up as well.

I'm not a carpet guy either, but typically I've seen the tack strip installed about 1/4" from the trim piece. You said that the tile was installed on "concrete backer board" over plywood. The picture where you can see the tack strip looks like it has oriented strand board (osb) under the tack strip. Was the osb used as an underlayment to raise the height of the carpet to transition better with the tile?
 
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Old 02-28-11, 07:13 AM
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I don't think anything was used to raise the level of the carpet to better meet the tile. I cleaned all of the gunk out of the first picture and it is just on plywood. The carpet is much lower than the tile. In the first picture the grout has not cracked between the tile and trim piece and still looks really good. It has a much wider grout line than the other two pictures. And the trim piece is definetely higher than the tile.

So what is the best way to go about fixing this? Can I put in carpet shims to raise the level of the carpet?
I want to scrape out all of the grout and totally regrout it. What can I do to ensure that the grout does not crack between the tile and trim piece?
 
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Old 02-28-11, 10:38 AM
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And the trim piece is definetely higher than the tile.
If thats the case, that row of tile needs to be removed, along with the trim piece. The correct height trim piece should be installed, then the row of tile gets reinstalled. If the trim piece is too high, every time you step on that joint you are moving the trim piece and thus the grout is cracking. I'm not sure who the manufacturer of the trim your guy used is, but heres a link to the trim I use. It has good instructions on sizing and installation.

Schluter-SCHIENE - Schluter-Systems

Schluter-SCHIENE - Schluter-Systems


So what is the best way to go about fixing this? Can I put in carpet shims to raise the level of the carpet?
I'm not a carpet guy, but yes the carpet needs to be ramped up so that its at the right height where it meets the trim. See link below.

Carpet Shims provides the solution to the height difference between carpet, tile or hardwood
 
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