Saving money on granite countertop installation - bad idea

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  #1  
Old 03-29-11, 12:37 PM
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Saving money on granite countertop installation - bad idea

I am planning on installing a granite countertop on my outdoor bbq island. The island seems to be growing every time I look at my sketch. So i'll need a lot of granite. There is a place locally that sells prefab granite slabs with bullnose finish on one side (in case of 26") or bullnose all around (in case of 42") .
After looking around this and other forums that mention granite installation, it seems like I will need to use at least one (most likely two) layers of 3/4 (assuming better to use marine grade) plywood. Then screw a layer of a hardybacker on top of it and set the granite on a thinset on top of that. That will make at least 2" thickness I'll need to cover with bullnose. From what I can tell their bullnose is 1.25" or 1.5" thick. If I will be installing the granite myself - I know I know it may end up costing me more....
I was thinking to avoid making that perfect mating surface between slabs, can I use some kind "spacer" like a T that would overlap both slabs and have some flexibility especially I am installing it outside.
So two questions:
a. Is there such a thing as spacers I want to use (stainless???)
b. How can I cover the edge of my counters to compensate for the thickness of the underlayment?
c. am I smoking something, thinking I can do it myself, if yes what?
 
  #2  
Old 03-30-11, 08:41 PM
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i have nothing under my granite. idk why you think you need too

if i am understanding your idea/s correctly. i would glue the pieces together (they have granite glue).

or, set the slabs as tile = grout in between them.
 
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Old 03-31-11, 07:28 AM
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Are you planning granite countertop or granite tiles? If it's a countertop made from a slab of granite 1 1/4" thick you may not need anything underneath. It depends on how the granite is supported underneath.

In any case you won't need thinset and probably not plywood if your island will provide adequate support. If you are using 2 or more slabs in your project the granite supplier can probably provide a color matched epoxy for the seam.
 
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Old 04-02-11, 11:04 PM
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Thanks a lot!

I will have concrete block wall supporting the granite with 48" maximum spacing. The problem is that since it is outside I am concerned with soil movement. We do have small earthquakes here all the time, regardless if we feel it or not. I have about 6" concrete pad as a footing for the walls as well.
I've seeing those granite slabs crack even inside some kitchens, assuming it depends on the "quality" of the granite as well as the installation.
 
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Old 04-03-11, 07:56 AM
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i didn't think of earthquakes. so, in that case, i would float it. make a wood top. and a little glue to hold the slab.
 
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Old 04-03-11, 08:31 PM
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thanks,
I am thinking of using hardybacker just to keep it little thinner and hope it works
 
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Old 04-05-11, 04:34 AM
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Last I looked, Hardi isnt rated for outdoor use. Additionally, unlike plywood, Hardi offers no structural support at all. Its purpose is to be a good bonding surface for thinset mortar.

I dont know of anything that will prevent the slab from cracking if the blocks crack and you have vertical movement under the slab.
 
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Old 04-06-11, 10:13 AM
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thanks

Sure makes sense to me,
so back to my "main" question(s)
If I do use plywood outside (and I bet it's going to get drenched at times), what plywood should I use i.e. marine grade or??? and do I use just one sheet of plywood or two staggered. I guess I could also "Stain" the plywood before installation but then granite will have nothing to adhere to. Also, is a "nifty" way to avoid using bull-nose on the inside edge of my top counter?
Thanks!
 
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Old 04-10-11, 10:50 AM
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i would use marine grade. all 1 piece as much as possible. glue the granite to it. and secure the plywood to the block wall, in such a way that if the ground moves the plywood would have enough "give" as to not transfer stress to the slabs. but yet not move when being used. glue perhaps.

the front edge of the plywood. just put some nice trim on it. and use bull nose.

and remember that it is always possible that something can still happen.
 
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Old 04-24-11, 08:48 PM
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Slate?

Kind of a followup question,

If you had your choice (considering price to be the least important factor) what material would you recommend for the outdoor kitchen/bbq? My main concern(s) is durability of the surface and resistance to stain. I've seeing too many of those stained all over the place and looking quite sad.
It's not that price is the least important factor to my, quite contrary I just want that not to affect your judgment.
I am rethinking my countertop and considering slate (apparently there is different type of surfaces) , granite (only 1 1/4" ) or a slate looking porcelain tile.
Any suggestions?
Thanks!
 
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Old 04-24-11, 09:10 PM
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stainless steel ?

...........................
 
  #12  
Old 04-24-11, 10:24 PM
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Not sure how much it would cost, but not a bad idea, although my wife will probably kill me if do something like that.
I guess it's worth investigating though.
 
  #13  
Old 04-29-11, 06:50 PM
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I think I wen a full circle on this and still keep going
Got another granite quote today and don't like it. What do you think of countertop made from flagstone. i know it's heavy but probably not much heavier than granite and I hope I don't need a bullnose on it. Speaking of the bullnose, can I make my bullnose out of flagstone and continue with tile? The only issue I see with it is the questionable ability to seal it really well, not only from water but from grease splatter etc.
Any suggestions/ideas?
Thanks!
 

Last edited by Newbie; 04-29-11 at 09:08 PM. Reason: brain
  #14  
Old 05-01-11, 09:27 AM
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just do something. but keep in mind that whatever you do, an earthquake may damage it = how much $$$ are you willing to risk ...
 
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Old 05-02-11, 09:16 AM
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True that! And i don't have an earthquake insurance, neither do I know anyone who does
 
 

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