Tiling an outdoow countertop - BBQ

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Old 05-27-11, 11:21 PM
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Tiling an outdoow countertop - BBQ

Thank you for your interest in my project!
have finally decided to proceed with porcelain tile on my future bbq countertop.I even purchased the tile (that I now regret) but that another story. The following was my initial plan for the countertop.
http://www.doityourself.com/forum/fl...-bad-idea.html
My bbq will have horizontal supports made from the angle iron in places with more that 24" unsupported span. Since I was unable to find reasonably priced marine grade plywood, I am still going with the hardy backer and thinset porcelain on top of it.
The tile I bought - without taking the delivery, ended up been a glazed porcelain, that I suspect is not the ideal tile for the outdoor bbq. I am thinking now of switching to the "unglazed" or color- through porcelain and maybe using the glazed on only as my backsplash. I don't think that store has a matching "unglazed" bullnose and/or quarterround for the tile I think I want. Can I "work around it" i.e. cut the tile on 45 wherever I have tile meet in the corner were I'd otherwise use quaretrround? I also have an undermount sink that I need to install in that tile, another "reason" for me to want the unglazed tile- no?
 
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Old 05-28-11, 05:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Newbie View Post
Since I was unable to find reasonably priced marine grade plywood, I am still going with the hardy backer and thinset porcelain on top of it.
Why would you do this when you have been advised not to do so, and given sound reasoning. So if the marine plywood is expensive, are you going to sacrifice your BBQ stability for $30?
No need to miter the inside corners of the porcelain. You will set the backsplash directly on the field tile and you will have a grout line, just like everywhere else. Why do you think a glazed tile would not be adequate for the field?
Certainly do your homework on the opening where your undermount sink will go. You will have a bear of a time tiling inside the opening. I would opt for a drop in unit. Better support, less trim, less possibility of the sink removing itself due to weather changes.
 
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Old 05-28-11, 09:57 PM
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Newbie:

What you SHOULD do is spend a few hours at:

Schluter Systems - Homepage - Schluter-Systems

Schluter makes a large variety of ceramic tiling accessories designed to solve specific ceramic tiling problems. For example, if one is tiling a kitchen counter top, it's common to have a crack open up in the grout joint between the top and the backsplash. (really, that joint should be caulked, but it's common to see it grouted) Schluter makes a stainless steel extrusion that fits in that corner, covers the cut ends of the tiling, allows movement between the top and backsplash and also keeps that joint waterproof.



Schluter also makes brushed aluminum and polished brass extrusions that cover the front edge of your counter top. These extrusions extend down either 1 3/8 or 2 1/4 inches to cover the plywood and tile backer board, depending on how your top is constructed.



If I wuz you, I'd incorporate products like these into your tiling project rather than try to solve the tiling problems yourself. It'll cost a bit more, but you'll get a better counter top.

You can order Schluter products through any tiling retailer.
 

Last edited by Nestor; 05-28-11 at 10:39 PM.
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Old 05-29-11, 07:51 AM
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Thanks!

Thank you both.
I actually ordered the HD outdoor grade 3/4 plywood rite before I posted the question regarding mitering (btw, I was more concerned with the outside corners but I guess they could be grouted as well) and was going to use a thinner HB on top just for better thinset adhesion. That should also give me ability to waterproof the plywood without the worry of affecting the tile adhesion. Schluter is actually exactly what I was looking for, just couldn't find the link to it.
Thanks again,
 
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Old 05-29-11, 09:37 PM
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BTW, can convert the undermount sink into the top mount? I have a nice looking undermount and just to avoid the hassle and to save me from buying another sink, can I put some kind of trim around the sink and make it look good to boot?
 
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Old 05-30-11, 05:49 AM
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With the money and time you will be spending on this countertop, don't just use what you have lying around for a sink. How do you propose to treat the inside of the opening of the countertop in order to make the transition from horizontal top surface to the sink? You will need to lay tile in the opening, which I don't even think the pros would tackle. I would definitely pop for a new rim mount sink and seal it in good.
 
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Old 05-30-11, 08:41 AM
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I also agree with Chandler. Compared to the cost of the project, picking up a top mount sink is a fairly minor cost and when well sealed you will not have to deal with potential water penetration damage later as well. Undermount sinks are really made for stone counters like granite, marble, soap stone, or some other man made comparable products. The other option if you really want an undermount sink is to change direction and try and buy something like granite from a dealer that sells 'left over' job site pieces at a significantly reduced cost and doesn't charge too much for making the necessary cuts. I have done that before and was happy with the result. I did a 4' bathroom vanity once in a beautiful black granite all in for under $300 including cuts and faucet holes.
 
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Old 05-30-11, 08:41 AM
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Yep

If it's not obvious - I have no clue of what am I doing

I was going to tile all the way up to the opening and put some HD (if it exists) PVC seal around the rim of the sink. And then seal the bottom of the mounting surface of the sink to the tile with silver RTV type automotive sealant. It seemed to work (the sealant did) in my kitchen pretty well, compare to anything else i've tried so far and it blends very well with the stainless surface of the sink as well. I hear what you saying - spend a little more and get the right stuff. The thing is, I went almost twice over my budget doing just that - spending just a little more on EVERYTHING. The sink I have right now was purchased with granite undermount installation in mind and cost me $130 - 18 gauge 304 - SS double sink. From what I gather, between the HD and Lowe's (the two cheapest retailers in my neck of the woods) the 18 gauge SS sink overmount will cost me around $350 for a double sink and I suspect that will not even be a 304 steel

American Standard Culinaire 33 In. x 22 In. Stainless Steel Double Bowl Kitchen Sink - 7504.103.075 at The Home Depot

If I want 304 steel (and I assume that's what I want for the outdoor use) i'd have to go with something like this:
Elkay Lustertone Top-Mount 16 in. x 28 in. Single Bowl Kitchen Sink - DLRS3322103 at The Home Depot
And even after paying close to a grand I am still not having a double sink that I prefer to have.
Very open for suggestions.
Thanks!
 
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Old 05-30-11, 09:19 PM
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1. Ask if you can return that undermount sink. Using an undermount sink here just makes everything more difficult. You can use an undermount sink if you have a SOLID counter top materials like granite or marble or fake marble. I don't think you're going to be able to find any sort of vinyl material that will allow you to bend it into a fairly tight radius (like a sink) AND STILL have some sort of flange on top to cover the edge of your hole. Any "L" shaped material can't be bent very far before one arm or the other is gonna start to twist.

2. There no such thing as indoor and outdoor stainless steel. Any stainless steel will work equally well outdoors as it does indoors. And so you don't need to spend $350 on a stainless steel sink. The problem here is that everyone wants their stainless steel sink to be made out of the hardest and thickest gauge stainless you can get so it doesn't get scratches and dents. The problem is that to stamp any sheet metal into as radical a shape as a kitchen sink gets exponentially more expensive the thicker and the harder the steel you're trying to stamp. That's because the steel is going to crack and/or tear before it gets to the desired shape. In this case, spend less on a thinner guage softer stainless steel that can be stamped into a sink more easily, so the cost of manufacturing is lower, so the retail price is lower. As long as it's stainless steel, it's going to last you a lifetime. They put cheap stainless steel sinks into apartment block kitchens, and they last as long as the building does.

3. What you're acquiring is something called "experience". You can be sure of that because if you had to start this project over again, you'd make different decisions. That knowledge of what to do differently next time only comes with experience.

3.
 
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Old 06-01-11, 11:45 AM
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Schluter

Schluter is sure nice looking product, but the price - ouch

I have a guy selling a 1/8 x 2.5" (various lengths) flat aluminum bar - Is there any way I can use that instead?
Thanks!
 
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Old 06-01-11, 01:58 PM
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I'll add a couple of comments.

As to the selection of tile, porcelain is a good choice for exterior use.

As to hardibacker, last I checked, its not rated for outdoor use. Pick a cement board that is rated for outdoor use. There are many. Make sure the manufacturer says it can be used for exterior projects.

If you are using Schluter ditra in an exterior application, it needs to be over a properly sloped wood framed structure, and you must use a cement backerboard rated for exterior use over the exterior plywood. Then ditra gets installed over the cement board with unmodified thinset.

The pictures shown in nestor's posts are for an "interior" countertop installation and that method will not work on an exterior application. As far as I'm aware, the schluter trims can be used in exterior applications.

Schulter has a "Ditra Handbook" on their website with lots of good info that will be helpful to you.

http://www.schluter.com/media/DitraHandbook.pdf
 
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Old 06-01-11, 09:57 PM
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Thanks a lot,

I am switching to a cement board now to it should be all good.
Should I use RedTop on the plywood or the board? I want to do everything possible to have stable surface.
 
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Old 06-01-11, 11:34 PM
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Newbie:

I've never heard of "Red Top", but I've heard of a product called "Red Guard". It's a water-impermeable "paint" that gets applied over the tile backer board. Then, you spread your thin set onto the Red Guard and tile over the Red Guard.

Apparantly, that's because ceramic tiling isn't necessarily water proof, even when new. Having a water impermeable layer between the tiling and the tile backer board ensures that everything behind that layer stays dry.
 
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Old 06-02-11, 07:23 AM
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You can use RedGard in exterior applications over cement board that is rated for exterior use. Yes, the RedGard goes on the cement board, not on the plywood.

http://www.custombuildingproducts.co...er=arc&lang=en
 
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Old 06-02-11, 10:46 AM
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Thanks a lot!
That's exactly what I meant to say - where I got the "Top" - no idea
 
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Old 06-02-11, 11:00 PM
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is this correct

Just poking around the net I see the following statement :
"If the base is plywood, random dot and dash saw cuts 6"-8" parallel to the cabinet edge need to be made. The 1/4" spacing or saw cuts are designed to allow the wood to equalize moisture content. If moisture does not equalize in the boards, the boards can buckle and warp causing the tile above to fracture."
a. Is this technique still necessary while RedGuard is used
b. If yes, how it is actually done i.e. how often are the cuts made (i am still not very comfortable "ruining" my new and expensive plywood) and how far apart?

Thanks!
 
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Old 06-03-11, 07:45 AM
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Newbie

I have never done it that way.

One of the reasons you don't apply the redgard directly to the plywood and then tile (skipping the cement board), is that the plywood is a little more unstable and susceptible to movement outdoors where temperature and moisture conditions will vary more than indoors.

The movement of the cement board will more resemble the movement of the tile above, and will provide some uncoupling from the plywood. The membrane will also provide some uncoupling, and as such, I think you should be fine without making any cuts to the plywood.

As a side note, if i'm doing any work outdoors, I try to work with cement block rather than framed lumber when possible.
 
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Old 06-03-11, 02:44 PM
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Thanks!
I misspoke i.e. was unable to paste the whole article. They are saying to pretty much use the plywood first than the cement board and than some kind of membrane. In some cases they say membrane like Red Guard is used in between plywood and cement board. As far as not using the plywood, that was my initial plan, but pretty much everyone (other than you ) tried to talk me out of it, so here I am with my plywood down already. I am going to protect it from the bottom as well with most likely a couple of coats of exterior wood solid stain. Unless you have other suggestions.
What about cutting those ****s in the plywood? Good/bad idea?
Thanks,

I am a bad boy now just one letter and ***** , just thought I'd post the whole article.
Tile Countertop Methods
 
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Old 06-03-11, 11:28 PM
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Newbie:

Cutting slots into plywood is going to weaken it, from just a little to a whole lot, depending on how deep your cuts are. If you're using lumber to support the tile backer board or mortar bed, then cuts made parallel to the wood grain won't weaken lumber by nearly as much. But plywood is a different story cuz then you're cutting across the wood grain no matter which direction you cut it.

However, if you want to prevent any change in the moisture content of your plywood, and therefore any difference in moisture content between plys, simply paint it with any oil based paint or polyurethane before screwing the cement backer board to it. (the higher the gloss, the better and the mistints at the paint store that clear out for $3 per quart or $10 per gallon work the best)

THE WHOLE IDEA of using cement board over plywood is to ensure that the substrate for the tile is dimensionally stable. Wood swells and shrinks with changes in it's moisture content caused by rain or seasonal changes in the temperature and humidity of the air outdoors. Plywood is strong, but since it's made of wood it's not dimensionally stable enough to be a good substrate for tiling. Cement board, or even drywall, is dimensionally stable, but not strong enough to make a good substrate for tiliing either. However, by cladding plywood with cement board, you get a strong structure with a dimensionally stable surface to tile over.

If the surface you tile over is dimensionally stable, then there won't be any tensile or compressive forces inside the tiling that could cause grout joints to crack. It's directly analogous to standing on the fault line the day before the quake. There can be tremendous stresses in the rock a mile below your feet, but if the ground you're standing on isn't moving, then you're not aware of any stresses, and from your perspective, everything's perfectly stable and there are no stresses anywhere. It's the same with tiling; any forces causing the plywood to shrink or expand are gonna be carried by the screws holding the cement board to the plywood and/or any thin set between them. The screws holding the cement board to the plywood might wiggle a bit in slow motion as the plywood swells and shrinks from season to season, but as long as the tile backer board doesn't swell or shrink, the grout joints in the tiling are unaware of any stresses below and therefore don't have any excuse to crack. From the grout joint's perspective, there is no plywood shrinkage or expansion cuz the tile backer board it's sitting on isn't stretching or shrinking.

Besides, plywoods are made of SOFT woods, which don't swell or shrink with very much force, so even the rigidity of the dry plys in the plywood is normally sufficient to prevent plywood from buckling if it gets left out in the rain and only the top ply gets wet. You're not likely to encounter even that situation with your tiling and RedGuard preventing that top ply from getting wet. And, it's not gonna get wet enough from below for the plywood to wanna buckle the other way.

PS: (you don't need to know the rest)
Most people are aware that wood swells when it gets wet, and shrinks as it dries out. However, most people don't know that the swelling and shrinking is entirely due to the WOOD CELL WALLS getting thicker when they're wet and shrinking in thickness as they dry out. Because wood cells are shaped like long drinking straws, you get vastly more wood cell walls as you go across the grain of the wood than along the grain of the wood. Consequently, the amount of swelling and shrinkage in wood is typically about 80 times more across the grain than along the grain. In fact, in most cases, wood shrinkage along the grain of the wood is ignored because it is so small.
And, because hardwood contain smaller wood cells and therefore more cell walls, hardwoods expand and contract more with changes in their moisture content more than soft woods. In fact, in a hardwood you can get as much as an 8 percent change in dimension from "living" to an "oven dried" condition. That's a full 1 inch difference in height in a hardwood 2 X 12 floor joist.
One often hears that temperature affects wood's dimension. That's not because of thermal expansion. It's because wood cell walls get thicker as the equilibrium moisture content of wood increases, and get thinner as the equilibrium moisture content of the wood decreases. The equilibrium moisture content of the wood depends on the ambient temperature and the relative humidity of the air. Consequently, temperature differences cause dimensional changes in wood only because the ambient temperature of the air affects the wood's equilibrium moisture content.
 

Last edited by Nestor; 06-04-11 at 12:22 AM.
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Old 06-04-11, 12:04 AM
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Thanks a lot Nestor!

I love your in-depth explanation of how things work here. No slots for me, I mean for my plywood. Now on the quest to find that ugliest paint
Shouldn't be too much trouble, I see them all the time while wondering "what were they thinking/smoking"
Thanks again,
 
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Old 06-04-11, 02:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Newbie View Post
I love your in-depth explanation of how things work here.
I've never let my not knowing anything about a subject prevent me from speaking authoritatively, and often at considerable length, about it. Good to know there are others in here that appreciate that.

Make sure it's an oil based coating you buy. That is, either linseed oil based (if you can still find it), real varnish, alkyd (which is what's sold as "oil based" nowadays) or polyurethane (which are really just modified alkyd resins). Latex coatings are permeable to H2O molecules. Paint the edges of the plywood too.
 

Last edited by Nestor; 06-04-11 at 02:18 PM.
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Old 06-04-11, 09:56 PM
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Thanks again for your suggestion, it turned out I had oil based primer at home, so I used it first, it went on pretty thick. Next is the oil paint.
Would you or anyone else please suggest what I can do to stiffen up the shelf i have as part of my bbq. The shelf is 17 ft. long and 16" wide. Unfortunately it does not feel stif enough even after sandwiching plywood and wonderboard together. I have 10" L brackets every 3ft under the shelf but when I pull down on the edge of the shelf it still flexes a bit. Since I never done this type of application, I have no idea how much flex is actually acceptable, No flex at all I assume is achievable but probably requires some kind of concrete pouring. Should I just add more L brackets?
Thanks,
 
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Old 06-04-11, 11:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Newbie View Post
The shelf is 17 ft. long and 16" wide. Unfortunately it does not feel stif enough even after sandwiching plywood and wonderboard together. I have 10" L brackets every 3ft under the shelf but when I pull down on the edge of the shelf it still flexes a bit.
You have a shelf 17 feet long by 16 inches deep and you've fastened 10 inch long pieces of angle iron every 3 feet to the underside of the shelf.

You'd have done much better to fasten 16 inch long pieces of angle iron to the underside of the shelf every three feet.

I kinda doubt that the plywood itself is bending. I expect that whatever is supporting that shelf is allowing the shelf to move a bit, and you're interpreting that movement of the shelf as the plywood bending. Maybe set a straight edge (of sorts, like a 16 inch wide piece of glass) on the shelf and try pulling down on the front edge of the shelf then. See if you can see a gap open up between the straight edge and the wonderboard. If you don't see any gap, then the whole shelf is moving, not bending.

How thick is your plywood and can you glue and clamp 16 inch long pieces of 2X4 to the underside of the shelf between the steel brackets? I'd use LePage's PL Premium construction adhesive to glue the 2X4's on. PL Premium attains a bond strength 3 times stronger than competitive construction adhesives within 24 hours cure time.

You can also now buy Ultimate PL Premium that has a much stronger initial grab (more like adhesive tape than a construction adhesive).
 
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Old 06-05-11, 07:31 AM
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What i did was put the 10" L brackets not the angle iron (i think that is where is my mistake) when i pouring the concrete to fill my block. So the L brackets are kind of concreted in the wall. I think that's exactly what is happening. The flexing is in the L brackets and not in the plywood. I think I should take a picture of what I am doing, so my mistakes are more obvious
Speaking of mistakes - one of my buddies asked me what am I gona do if one of my grills has grease catch on fire and my whole underside of the counter is plywood?
Is that a concern or he is just scaring me ?
 
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Old 06-05-11, 11:11 AM
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In my view, 3/4 inch plywood is plenty rigid enough to make a shelf even if it's only supported every 3 feet. You're not gonna be keeping 250 pound pig carcasses on that shelf, only bar-b-que sauce, dishes, cuttlery, mustard, relish, etc.

You do get grease fires in Bar-B-Ques, but generally they're small and more of a nuisance than a safety hazard. If you're concerned about it, you can drywall screw 1/2 inch sheet rock to the underside of any plywood shelves that will be over your Bar-B-Que grills.

1/2 inch drywall has a fire rating of 1/2 hour (which is quite high) because there's an awful lot of H2O chemically bound up in the gypsum core of the drywall. You can also buy 5/8 inch Fire Stop drywall which has a longer fire rating mostly because they don't mix the gypsum slurry when making that stuff so there's no air bubbles in the gypsum to make it lighter.

When drywall is heated (as in the case of a house fire), it's this bound up water that is driven off first. Unless and until the water in the gypsum core is driven off by the heat (reducing that gypsum to a white powder called Calcium oxide), then the plywood above the gypsum won't get any hotter than 100 degrees Celsius or 212 deg Fahrenheit, which won't do any harm to the plywood. It's very much like putting a pot of water on the stove to boil. It doesn't matter how hot the heating element gets, that water won't get any hotter than 212 deg. F. It'll just take less time to completely boil off the hotter the heating element (or house fire) gets.

Personally, I wouldn't worry about it much. Bar-B-Que fires caused by liquified fat dripping onto something hot and igniting are more of a nuisance than they are a safety hazard. Even the coat of paint you have on the underside of your counter top will stand up to some heat, and if there's any damage to that paint, then another coat of paint over it will fix the damage.

And, if you go the drywall route, the drywall is easily replaced should you ever have the Mother of all Bar-B-Que fires that lasts longer than 1/2 an hour.

Alternatively, just keep a spray bottle handy so that you can put out the fire and mist water onto the underside of the painted plywood. A small Bar-B-Que fire isn't going to set your plywood on fire in anything less than the time it takes for you to assess the situation several times, consult with those present at the time and collectively decide that spraying some water to put out the fire and cool the underside of the plywood would be prudent. Until any water film on the underside of the plywood boils away, the plywood won't get any hotter than 212 deg. F which won't harm the wood.
 
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Old 06-05-11, 03:22 PM
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Thanks a lot again Nestor!

Again I love your in-depth explanations, plus they actually make sense, at least to me
I will most likely end up drywalling the underside like you've suggested and painting on top of it so it does not deteriorate as quickly as otherwise.
As far as brackets, I will most likely add some more just to see if it helps, I'd hate to put so much work in it and have a crappy looking countertop.
Thanks,
 
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Old 06-05-11, 10:53 PM
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Should also mention that if you happen to use a Fire Stop drywall, then be aware that you're likely to find fiberglass fibers inside the gypsum core when you cut this drywall to the right size. You also may find fiberglass fibers in any drywall you use.

In the event of a fire, the fibers serve to hold the core together so that once the face paper is burned off the drywall, the gypsum core doesn't just break into chunks and fall off the wall.

If you find fiberglass fibers in any drywall you use, take the time to sand the cut edges down to remove any loose fibers so that there's no possibility of them dropping onto your food later on and being ingested.
 
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Old 06-06-11, 07:57 AM
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Thanks,
and I assume, one mus were a mask or something while sending those fibers, as not to inhale them either.
 
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Old 06-06-11, 10:14 PM
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I don't think fiberglass fibers have been linked to any lung diseases like asbestos has, but better to wear a dust mask than inhale that stuff. Prolly wouldn't do you harm, but it's not going to do any good to inhale fiberglass fibers.
 
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Old 06-07-11, 12:27 AM
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Thanks Nestor,
One more ( so far) question.
When I leveled the plywood on top of my "cabinet" it left a lot of voids, that I suspect contributing, at lest to some degree tot he flex I have in my shelf. Regardless, I would like to fill those voids with something. All my searches came with not much results. So what material is better used for filling the voids like that?
Thinset? Some kind of outdoor adhesive? Any other suggestions?
Thanks,
 
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Old 06-07-11, 11:11 AM
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The difference between ordinary plywood and plywood meant to be used as underlayment on floors is that in underlayment plywood, any voids in interior plys have to be smaller than a certain diameter or filled with "water putty". Otherwise you can get a "soft spot" on a floor which could result in problems (like ceramic tiles or grout cracking). BUT, I don't know that water putty is suitable for use outdoors. Me thinks that if the water putty is covered with Red Gard and tiling, it won't see any water, but I'm hoping Here's Johnny will know what better to use for exterior applications.

You should be able to find water putty at any hardware store. They use water putty because it shrinks very little as it dries. Still, it's best to fill, allow to dry, fill in the shrinkage, allow to dry, and then sand smooth.
 
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Old 06-07-11, 01:48 PM
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Thanks again Nestor,

I hope we are talking about the same "voids". The one I am seeing is between my block wall and the plywood (not the plywood layers itself) after leveling the counter.
From what you are describing the water putty sounds like a material that designed to fill shallow spaces/voids or something like Fix-It-All that I buy at HD. In some places my gaps are 1/4" maybe more where I can't see it. Will Fix-It-All take care of that? & I am not sure how does that hold up to the moisture environment.
Thanks,
 
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Old 06-07-11, 04:58 PM
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Newbie:

Sorry. I thought you were talking about voids in the plywood plies. If this is between your plywood and the concrete block wall it butts up against, then I'm not sure I see the need to fill those gaps. That's cuz the tiling that covers the plywood will cover them.

However, if you want to fill in those gaps with something, I'd just caulk them. I can't see that filling them with anything else is going to make your shelf stronger.

If you're looking for a good caulk, look no further than Kop-R-Lastic.



Kop-R-Lastic is similar to silicone caulk in that it forms a rubber-like compound when cured. That rubber sticks plenty good enough to all construction materials, but the rubber's "cohesive strength" is even greater than it's "adhesive strength". That means that it sticks to itself even better than it sticks to other things. The advantage to that is that if you ever want to replace the caulk, you just get one end of the caulk loose, and it pulls off the wall our out of the joint just like a rubber rope.

I won't use anything but Kop-R-Lastic outdoors on my building now. That's cuz the hardest part of maintaining the caulk around a building is removing the old caulk. And, Kop-R-Lastic makes removing the old caulk a breeze. That's not to say that it comes off easily; you have to pull pretty hard to pull it off glass, plastic, wood, whatever. It's just that it holds together so that it pulls off cleanly, and you're immediatly ready to recaulk.
 
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Old 06-07-11, 08:58 PM
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Got it,
Thanks!

So it's similar somewhat tot he sikaflex that I use a lot for the same purpose. I suspect that if I ever have to remove the countertop the whole thing will have to go all together so the caulk's cohesiveness is not that much of a benefit in this application. Although it's a very nice feature for anything else I have to disassemble later. I will check out it's MSDS to see if I can use it around my grill because it's only a drop-in and nothing (other than gravity) is holding it to the countertop.
 
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Old 06-07-11, 10:33 PM
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Which Sikaflex caulk do you use that's similar to Kop-R-Lastic?

I'm familiar with Sikaflex 1a, which is a one component moisture cure polyurethane, but I wasn't aware that Sikaflex made a product similar to Kop-R-Lastic. If you let me know what the name of the product is, I'll pick up a tube or two and try it out.
 
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Old 06-08-11, 03:37 PM
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Nestor,
I am using the same product you do, the 1a. The reason I said it's similar was because it's still a caulk and can be used outdoors.
As far as RedGuard, when you applying it do you prefill the expansion joints with thinset or anything else first? It's not very clear in their instructions, plus they say "apply to clean, dry surface" then they say "for water proofing, dampen the surface first" I realize damp is not wet, but it's not dry either.
Thanks,
 
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Old 06-14-11, 11:45 AM
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"tiling" the apron

Back to it,
at least I hope to be tomorrow. My house is been tented for termites rite now, so there is no way to be working around it.
Looks like even if I use the Schluter anything it's gona cost me an arm and possibly a leg, considering my 16' length just on one side of the bbq. Since I will be using quartzite stone (~1/2") on my footrest of the bbq, I would like to "tie it in" together with my countertop.
My questions; - Is it feasible/doable to incorporate the quartzite pieces, like whatever I have as leftovers from my footrest into the apron? My apron is most likely will be built from a 2x4 (maybe two of them) flatside under my counter with cement board pieces on the faceside and the bottomside of it. If I extend the bottomside piece of the cement board past the front of the 2x4 enough to accommodate for the thickness of the quartzite. Am I giving enough of the support to the quartzite? Can I use modified (i am guessing with latex) thinset to permanently glue the quartzite pieces to the apron of the bbq?

Thanks,
 
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