How to store epoxy grout for later use

Reply

  #1  
Old 08-28-11, 09:26 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Monroe, La
Posts: 75
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
How to store epoxy grout for later use

I'm about to grout a small bathroom countertop with CRG-Lite Commercial Epoxy Grout from Home Depot. My question is how to store the remaining grout for later use. I read somewhere that the grout, once mixed, will actually last longer than mixed conventional grout, but it didn't say how best to store it. Can I simply leave it in a sealed container outside in a hot storage room or should I leave it inside the air conditioned house. Does it need to be kept chilled as in a refrigerator? How long can I expect it to last if stored properly?

Thanks for your help.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 08-28-11, 11:56 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,965
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
If it is epoxy based it will cure chemically, so storing it after mixing won't be an option. Store the dry components in freezer bags, sealed up in a dry cool place.
 
  #3  
Old 08-28-11, 01:20 PM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 23,981
Received 681 Votes on 628 Posts
Once you mix the two components the clock starts ticking and there's no reasonable way to stop it. You can dramatically slow down the curing by putting it in the freezer but that does not stop it. It just slows down the curing rate.
 
  #4  
Old 08-28-11, 09:13 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Monroe, La
Posts: 75
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the quick response. I just put the tub in the freezer. Realistically, how long will it likely keep?
 
  #5  
Old 08-29-11, 05:33 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,965
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
At the most a day or so. Again, epoxy cures chemically and nothing you can do will stop the chemical reaction once you mix them together.
 
  #6  
Old 08-29-11, 06:37 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 23,981
Received 681 Votes on 628 Posts
Chandler is correct. The best is to mix only what you will need but if you've already mixed your's up the freezer is the best bet. The exact time you have depends on the epoxy you are using since some cure faster than others. Also a colder freezer like a chest deep freeze will slow the curing process better than your household freezer but either should easily buy you a day. Make sure to remove your grout from the freezer before use and allow it to warm to room temperature. By it's consistency you should be able to tell if it's usable or not.

You probably have this data sheet but it provides instructions what to do if you get crystalization as a result of the freezing.

With all epoxies, a “crystallization” effect can occur
when the liquid gets below 45° F (7° C) and/or has
experienced multiple cycles of high and low
temperature changes. If material is hard, place the
sealed container (with the lid on), in warm tap water
at approximately 120° F (49° C) for 10 to 20 minutes,
and when re-liquefied, let the material return to
room temperature before mixing.
 
  #7  
Old 08-29-11, 09:33 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Monroe, La
Posts: 75
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the info. I just took the tub out of the freezer so that I can use it tonight. I only have a tiny area of backspash to grout. The grout that I used (CRG-Lite Commercial Epoxy Grout from Home Depot) comes in a tub with 2 bags of mud-like contents. The instructions said that you had to use all of both bags and to not attempt to make a partial batch. I take it other brands come in powder form and can be mixed in the quantity desired. This was first time I've used epoxy grout, but I found it very smooth and easy to spread. I hate that I have so much waste with a $24 tub of grout.
 
  #8  
Old 08-29-11, 09:46 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,965
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
Why did you choose a commercial epoxy grout, when a residential type grout would probably have worked just as well. Just curious.
 
  #9  
Old 08-29-11, 12:13 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Monroe, La
Posts: 75
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Chandler -- I picked up the grout in the tub simply because I thought that is was actually pre-mixed and made in the tub. I saw some other epoxy grouts in bags (I believe at Lowes) and the tub setup seemed the easiest and simpliest. At the time I bought it, I was planning to tile the kitchen countertop. Instead I ended up tiling the bathroom vanity. I'll get to the kitchen later in the year. What epoxy grout would you recommend?
 
  #10  
Old 08-29-11, 12:19 PM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 23,981
Received 681 Votes on 628 Posts
I used the commercial epoxy grout on my outside tiled porch and could not be happier and I've been kicking myself for not using the good stuff in my master bath shower.
 
  #11  
Old 08-29-11, 05:37 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Monroe, La
Posts: 75
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Unhappy

Live and Learn. After only a day and spending the night in the freezer, my tub of grout is now an anchor.

I'll either use regular non-sanded grout (gap is only 1/16) or leave it ungrouted until later. Does anyone know if the powder type epoxy grout comes in Haystack color?
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: