Which tile?


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Old 04-19-12, 11:04 AM
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Which tile?

I am looking at putting tile on my front porch to correct some issues with the original concrete.
What is the difference between ceramic and porcelane tiles? Which is better for outdoor use?
Thanks guys.
 
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Old 04-19-12, 11:29 AM
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I would not put either outside.

What's wrong with the porch?
 
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Old 04-19-12, 11:42 AM
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Why not? I have seen it done before with tile of some type and I like the look.

The concrete is not level and water either stands on it or puddles next to the house?
 
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Old 04-19-12, 11:45 AM
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Tile and grout are not waterproof and will not solve your issues.

I would look into fixing the concrete but that's just my 2.
 
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Old 04-19-12, 11:49 AM
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Is tile not to be used outdoors? Is the seams not water tight? I am confused as to why it wouldn't solve my issues.
 
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Old 04-19-12, 12:04 PM
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Nope, neither the tiles nor the seams are water tight.
 
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Old 04-19-12, 12:13 PM
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Then why is some tile rated for outdoor use and some is not? If the tile is sloped to make the water run off how is it any different than a brick or block patio floor?
 
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Old 04-19-12, 12:57 PM
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Porcelain tile is an ideal choice for outdoors. You first need to correct the porch so it is sloped 1/4" per foot away from the house and flat (not level), then use a membrane like ditra.
 
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Old 04-19-12, 01:22 PM
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Thanks for the helpful info.
 
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Old 04-19-12, 01:37 PM
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I think the main reason for not putting tile out on the porch are the porch issues itself. If the porch is not stable, and it apparently is not, then don't expect a miracle of tile. Using an underlayment will help, but if the shifting gets too much, it all will go. Any water that accumulates on the tile will also be accumulating under it, and will freeze, so proper slope is imperative prior to the tile installation.
 
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Old 04-19-12, 01:43 PM
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Yes, sorry - I was overly brief in my responses, the tile is not the problem it is your porch.
 
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Old 04-19-12, 02:18 PM
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What is the difference between ceramic and porcelane tiles?
Porcelain is ceramic. Not all ceramic is porcelain. Be sure to use a porcelain that is frost proof. "Real" porcelain is frost resistant, but lots of junk around that is not. Some are rated for freezing climates, but for a limited number of freeze thaw cycles, like 50 cycles.

Make sure the concrete will drain. Ditra is a great idea, but it can work without it.

Jaz
 
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Old 04-19-12, 02:54 PM
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The porch is very stable, no cracks, no movement at all. It was just a crappy job from the start. I am wanting to fix the drainage issue when I do the tile.
Thanks for the help.
 
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Old 04-19-12, 06:16 PM
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The concrete is not level and water either stands on it or puddles next to the house?
Then you said;

I am wanting to fix the drainage issue when I do the tile.
In the first quote you implied not level was a bad thing. Actually you do not want the porch to be level, level is bad. You want it flat but pitched so water will run off and away.

Tell us how you're gonna fix the slab if you know.

Jaz
 
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Old 04-19-12, 06:31 PM
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Not level in that there are low spots where water stands after a rain. The worst place is right up next to the house.
I was hoping to put a pitch in it with the tile. If I can get it level but pitched, which for the most part the porch is, then the low spots will be gone and water will not stand in puddles.
 
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Old 04-19-12, 06:51 PM
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How much of a pitch is there from the house to the edge of the porch from all directions? Is the entire slab leaning towards the house? Have you taken an 8-10 ft. straight edge to see how flat? Then added a level to see which way it pitches?

Jaz
 
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Old 04-19-12, 07:02 PM
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All I know for certain is there is a couple of low spots that collect water, not the entire porch. At the house there is about 1.5 inches to the bottom of the threshold of the door to the concrete. Right beside the door is the low spot (the worst one) If I can raise the floor that 1.5 inches and slope it to what I have now at the end away from the house (8ft) it will be better than what I have now.
I have not put a level on the porch but there is some slope there, with this extra I think I will be good to go.
 
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Old 04-19-12, 07:46 PM
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Maybe those two low spots are "birdbaths"? If you fill them, where will be water go? In other words which way is the pitch and how much per foot?

In your statement:
At the house there is about 1.5 inches to the bottom of the threshold of the door to the concrete.
Did you intend to say "from the bottom of..................." instead of to?

Am I understanding that you're planning to raise the floor 1.5" at the door and slope it for 8' to the edge? How you gonna do that? What size is this slab? Is the house on 1, 2 or 3 sides of it?

Jaz
 
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Old 04-19-12, 07:58 PM
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Yes, 1.5 inches from current concrete floor to the bottom of the threshold.
I don't know yet what would be the best material to use to raise the tile 1.5 inches, that was going to be the next question after I figured out which tile to use.
What I am envisioning is a flat plane of tile laying on my current porch that is raised up 1.5 at the house and tilted away from the house down to the the current front edge of the porch (with required thinset underneath of course).
The porch is approx. 8x24ft. The house is alone one 24ft side. Overall there is pitch away from the house, there is just low spots due to shotty finishing when it was poured. If I can get the tile laid flat but pitched my water problems should be solved.
 
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Old 04-19-12, 08:20 PM
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Sounds like you'll have to do a "mud-job". Sand/Portland mix and bonded to the old slab. It'll have to be about 3/4" at the thinnest though. So 1.5" slopped to the edge. Don't know if it'll work out with much slope though. You need to get a straight edge and a level and tell us what you got.

Jaz
 
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Old 04-19-12, 08:25 PM
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Take a look at this pic. It's by Davy of Tx from the JB forum.

Ceramic Tile Advice Forums - John Bridge Ceramic Tile

Jaz
 
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Old 04-19-12, 08:26 PM
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I will do that, but not tonight. Thanks for all your help.
 
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Old 05-01-12, 06:57 AM
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Which Tile?

I bet you use a granite tile, The best place to purchase granite counter tops is to visit a kitchen design store or a home improvement store.
 

Last edited by Tolyn Ironhand; 05-01-12 at 07:21 AM. Reason: removed link
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Old 05-01-12, 05:12 PM
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I bet you use a granite tile, The best place to purchase granite counter tops is to visit a kitchen design store or a home improvement store.
That's nonsense you spammer! :NO NO NO:

Jaz
 
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Old 05-02-12, 02:26 AM
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For me they are both slippery when wet so it's not good for outdoors...
 
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Old 05-03-12, 01:02 PM
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Sorry I called you a spammer. You sounded like one of the occasional spammers from Asia.

But still, what does your comment about counter tops have to do with outdoor tiles for a porch or patio?

As far as slippery when wet; No one would use polished granite tiles outdoors. Maybe bush-hammered, Flamed, or another of the textured finishes.

Jaz
 
  #27  
Old 05-18-12, 12:13 AM
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Type of tiles

There are three basic types of tile- Ceramic Tile, Porcelain Tile and Glass Tile. Of the three, ceramic and porcelain are the ones that confuse consumers most. Glass tile is apparently less confusing because everyone knows what glass is. So you can use Ceramic Tile for outdoors.
 
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Old 05-18-12, 01:05 AM
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tiles

Most types of tiles that are made from clay or a mixture of clay and other materials, then kiln-fired, are considered to be a part of the larger classification called "Ceramic Tiles". These tiles can be split into two groups, porcelain tiles and non-porcelain tiles. These non-porcelain tiles are frequently referred to as ceramic tiles by themselves, separate from porcelain tiles.


To be used outdoors, the tile must be frostproof and unglazed for floor use. Make sure the absorption rate is 0.5% or less.
 
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Old 05-18-12, 08:00 PM
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All porcelain tiles are ceramic, but not all ceramic is porcelain.

In cold temps, outdoor tiles must be frost proof and intended for long-term use outdoors. Some frost resistant tiles may only have a 50 cycle frost proof guarantee. So double check the specs, especially if buying cheapo tiles.

Jaz
 
 

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