Layout help needed

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Old 09-28-12, 07:43 PM
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Layout help needed

I have been a regular follower of this board for some time now as I was planning and executing a bathroom remodel. I have found most of my answers as far as prepping, building and waterproofing. I am finally ready to start tiling. I thought I would start with the bathroom floor because it is a small area, roughly 9x5, and should go pretty quick. The shower wall tiling will be the subject of future posts. The tile I am using is 13x13 and I was thinking of laying it in a standard grid pattern. The larger shower tile will be in a running bond pattern. My question is what would be the best option for the floor layout:
1- centering the tile in the doorway which would leave about a 9 inch cut tile on the left and right wall or
2- not centering the door as pictured below and using full tiles from the left visible wall and ending with a 5 inch cut tile on the right wall which would be behind a double vanity and toilet?
3- for the 1 1/2 inch gap where full tiles stop by the door, should I adjust everything to get even size cuts, about 7 1/4", across the shower and in front of the door?

3- I was thinking of using customs flex bond to set the color through porcelain tile using 1/4x3/8 trowel, sound like a good choice?
 
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Old 09-29-12, 04:45 AM
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Center the tile such that you have the 9" cuts on each side. Also, center the tile so that you have the 7 1/4" cuts (and no skinnies by the door). That will give you good symetry in the room. What will you be using as a transition at the doorway, a marble threshold? What you do at the transition may affect your final tile layout decision. Always avoid using less than 1/2
a tile if possible.

Your thinset and trowel size sound like a good choice to get started. Set a floor tile and pop it up. If you are getting full coverage the trowel size is good. If you are not getting full coverage then move up to a larger notch trowel. Depending on what the backs of your tiles look like, tile that size can need a 1/2" trowel for proper coverage. Dont forget to tape and mud all the floor joints either before or while you are setting the floor tile.
 
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Old 09-29-12, 05:51 AM
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Thanks for your quick reply. In the doorway I plan on using the schluter science trim and tucking the carpet to it, so the 7 1/4 inch tile on each end would be about right. I will tape the backer board seams as I tile and back butter the tiles as I set them. Thanks again!
 
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Old 10-28-12, 06:09 PM
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Shower tile

Well it's finally time to move on to tiling the shower. The wife is getting tired of sharing the kids bathroom. Once again I am stuck on the layout for the side walls. The back wall works out pretty good at under 60" using 19 3/4" long tile I need to cut 3/4" off the left side and right to get almost 3 full tiles across. The problem is the side walls, which from the back wall to the bullnose in the picture is 34 3/4". Would the way it is in the picture be visually appealing or is there another approach? It is currently not centered on the wall, but starts with a full tile in the corner. Another thought I had was to start with a full tile at the bull nose and end with the cuts in the corner opposite of what is pictured. I am just worried about how it would look with a 5" piece of tile next to the bull nose every other row. If I reverse it I could start with a full tile at the bull nose and the 5" would be in the corner, but I will lose the wrapped look because the back wall will be a 10" or so. I could also do two full tiles and end 5" past the shower out into the room and then the bull nose, but would 8" outside look dumb? I am thinking of scrapping the brick bond and just going with a stack bond. At this point the wife will go for anything. Anyone have preferance or what the trend is now a days?
 
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Old 10-29-12, 05:00 AM
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I like the picture of the layout you have on the walls. What I am curious about is the layout of the business end of the shower. Where is the plumbing trim in relation to your vertical and horizontal grout lines on the opposite wall? That is where you will most notice the symmetry or the lack there of. Your back will be to the wall you are showing most of the time.

Also, don't start your bottom row with a full height tile, you will need to make a small radius cut to hug the front lip of the base as it transitions from horizontal to vertical.
 
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Old 10-29-12, 05:36 AM
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Thanks Czizzi. I should have done this test layout on the plumbing wall. Of course the center of the shower valve is 17" so I don't think there is a way to center a joint or tile on that. Even if I go with a stack bond, I will have a full tile (19 3/4") and a 15" piece in the corner. I guess with a stack bond I could center a grout joint on the plumbing and cut both tiles to 17 "+/-. Didn't think about the radius on the front of the shower. Thanks!
 
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Old 10-29-12, 07:07 AM
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Let me know the following dimensions: Actual width of the shower base (do not include bullnose or anything, just the fiberglass base), distance of plumbing to back wall, distance of plumbing from top of shower base, and actual dimensions of the tile (height, width and thickness). I'll put pencil to paper and see what I can come up width. How many holes protrude through the backerboard? One only or more than one for hand-held shower arms or body sprays, etc. If more than one let me know all dimensions, including any slide bars for hand-helds.
 
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Old 10-29-12, 03:45 PM
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Thanks again Czizzi! Below is a pic with the dimensions. The wife decided she does not like the stack bond with the large format tile. Looks like I am stuck doing the 1/2 offset running bond. You know what they say...... a happy wife makes for a happy life.
 
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Old 10-30-12, 04:28 PM
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Sorry for the delay, the storm knocked me off line.

Proceed with your layout on a 1/2 tile staggered brick pattern so that you end up hitting the following marks.

Horizontal grout line bisects drop elbow for shower arm with the left edge of the same tile bisecting the supply valve center line. The supply valve will notch the vertical groutline 3 1/4" up on the tile with a full tile centered underneath that. The math, flowing tiles down, to the base would result in 1/2" cut off the bottom row all the way around. This 1/2" will also allow you to make your radius cut at the forward edge of the base.

Lay the tiles on the floor as they would appear on the wall with spacers (1/8") between each course. Transfer measurements from the wall onto the layout and make sure the math works out from the point of the drop elbow down.

Measure down to the first FULL row of tiles, transfer that measurement to your wall. Draw a level line all the way around the tub. Cut 1x4 pc. of lumber and attach this as a ledger board to that level line and begin your tile setting from there. After you have set all the tiles above the ledger board, remove the ledger board and cut each tile beneath it for a custom fit.

Duplicate your measurements on the back wall. I would set the front and back walls first and the long wall last. That way the overlay will be somewhat masked and make for a more finished look when you caulk the vertical seams.
 
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Old 10-30-12, 05:07 PM
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Basically this is what I was trying to convey. Good Luck



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Old 10-30-12, 07:49 PM
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Thanks again Czizzi. This weekend I will lay the tile out and make a story pole to see how everything works. I know in order to get the two tiles with a grout line centered on the valve, I will have to cut those 19 3/4" tiles down to 17" and maybe even the one that is centered and flanked by the cuts on both ends. Glad you're back on line. A lot of rain here in Hagerstown but not as much wind as I though thankfully. Never lost power.
 
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Old 10-30-12, 08:28 PM
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You can adjust the measurements to the right of the supply if you want, but you need to overlap the base at the radius cut enough that you can piece in a filler in the last 3 inches or so to the floor. Don't try to center the cuts left and right of the supply valve. That Math should have been done during rough-in of the plumbing. If you are putting a shower door up, the door will go in the center of the curb which will in essence change the perceived centerline of the tub. Your tiles will almost work out perfectly. You have large cuts on either side of the centerline, no one is going to notice that the left is an inch narrower than the right side.

And as always, we love to see finished pictures
 
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Old 11-06-12, 05:52 AM
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Czizi, the only way to get a vertical grout line centered on the valve is to cut both tiles down. The only full tile on the wall then would be the ones centered and flanked by +/- 1/2's. If I start at the bullnose with full and halfs and work to the corner the vertical grout joint misses the valve center by about 2". On to the next detail I am stuck on, the bullnose. The picture shows where I plan on stopping the field tile and starting the trim. Sorry, I could not get the photo to rotate to the right orientation. There is a slight angle to the face of the curb and a small radius on the edge. 1-Should I try to contour the tile to follow that radius? 2-On the bullnose, should I cut it following the ange and maintain the joint width? Lastly, for this post anyway, since the side walls will start at the bullnose with a 1/2 tile every other row, is it ok to pre-cut enough tiles in half? Thanks again!
 
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Old 11-06-12, 07:51 AM
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Not sure the aversion to cutting tile to make the grout lines work. I would not precut a bunch of tile unless you are 100% sure that the corner wall is perfectly plumb and doesn't waiver in any way. If it was me, I would move the bullnose and inch out from the tub, radius cut the bottom as per previous posts, maintain the same profile you would on the walls as far as caulk lines. Bullnose maintains a contiguous straight line, full pieces to the floor.

In this picture, I perform the radius cut on the tile coming up from the floor. The bullnose (or what should be) goes to the door casing. The iphone is great, but it takes lousy pictures, hopefully this helps.

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Old 11-23-12, 04:14 PM
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Slowly moving along. sorry to drag this out. When I install the bullnose up the left and right sides I will have a roughly 3/16" gap between the bullnose and the drywall due to using a 1/2" notched trowel for the wall tiles and using the same to keep the bullnose on the same plane. Is this normal? Not sue if I will caulk or grout this.
 
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Old 11-24-12, 06:13 AM
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Usually you use flexible colored grout. Do the best you can, you are using a very large notched trowel. I know you have large format tile, but for the most part, I use a v-notched trowel. If I need additional coverage due to the size of the tile, I back butter each individual tile. I also use a Thinset that is specifically designed for large format tile. It keeps the tile from sagging while waiting for the thinset to cure.
 
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