Bathroom floor/shower transition and design

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Old 11-09-12, 12:45 PM
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Bathroom floor/shower transition and design

First went to the bathroom design forum, it sends me elsewhere, hope this is the right forum to ask these questions. Please feel free to redirect if it's not.
I will be completely redesigning my downstairs bathroom & from what it looks so far will have to move some supply lines and sewer as well. I know that traditional way of addressing the shower stall in US is building some kind of shower pan and either "hot mop" or use some kind of wet barrier/liner. My wife wants/prefers a "European" style of the bathroom floor where the floor is even everywhere except the actual shower "pan/area" where it only slightly tapers off towards the drain. The whole shower enclosure is made of the hinged glass walls and doors, so when not in use can be somewhat neatly folded inside the stall and gives impression of the larger bathroom.
a. Is this design allowed by US building code (i know each state has individual code) but in general is this allowed?
b. Is it even practical as far as preventing the seeping to through the floor etc.

Thanks for your help in advance,
 
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Old 11-09-12, 12:47 PM
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I'm not sure I'm getting what you're saying - so the shower 'walls' fold up such that the shower floor becomes part of the rest of the bathroom when not in use as a shower?
 
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Old 11-09-12, 01:27 PM
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The easiest way to achieve this is with a trench drain. I have done several bathrooms this way. Although I did not use the folding glass, but did present it as an option. QuickDrain is a good example of this and one that I have used.

Shower Drain / Linear Drain Showers

The floor is sloped on either side of the drain, waterproofed similar to a traditional pan but out into the room as well.

Here is one that I completed last year. Complete with body jets and a rain head coming out of the ceiling.

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Old 11-10-12, 07:58 AM
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thanks!

Thanks for the quick replies &
Yes Mitch - that is my/our goal to have more space in the bathroom - it is a guest /downstairs bathroom.
Yes czizzi - this is what I am looking for actually even better than what I was looking for, because this design eliminates the ugly drain in the middle of the shower stall. I assume that drain runs on perimeter of the shower and I can still install the hinged "walls" around the drain. The ones we saw, have a "squidgy-like" bottom that prevents the water running all over the bathroom.
 
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Old 11-10-12, 08:40 AM
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The small strip you see in the pictures is the drain that runs the entire length of the shower. This one has a tile inlay, but you can get stainless drain covers as well. The rest of the shower slopes to the drain. On the other side of the drain, the tile slopes back toward the drain. It slopes a little less than 1/4" in 6" so any splash falls back to the drain. This door or curtain would sit directly over the drain.

Here was the glass door I recommended, but customer opted for a floor to ceiling curtain on a "L" shaped rod. The curtain tucks into the back corner out of the way. These glass door "accordian" out of the way or are similar to a multi paneled bi-fold glass door.

Wilsonglass.com / Pinterest
 
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Old 11-10-12, 09:29 AM
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Thanks again,
this is what I am planing on doing. Hope that drain i currently have inside the concrete slab will allow for a proper drainage and not cause any isues with back flow or smell from the sewer.
 
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Old 11-10-12, 01:06 PM
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If you are on a slab, some demo will need to take place. The drain will need to be moved over to the center of the trench drain. Please consult qualified people before you embark on this journey. You never said that it was on a slab. Not impossible, just requires a bit more advanced planning. On a side note, this is a cool shower and my wife desires that we update ours to a similar one.
 
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Old 11-10-12, 06:06 PM
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Thanks for the advice!
I know it will cost a bit more to do it this way, we will see how much more and if it's worth it.
 
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