DIY Mosaic Kitchen Backsplash Questions

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Old 01-25-13, 11:32 PM
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DIY Mosaic Kitchen Backsplash Questions

Hey everybody! I have been lurking around the forums for the past couple days and decided to go ahead and register today. So I figured I would see if you guys had any suggestions for our first "bigger" DIY project!

We purchased our home new construction last year and finally closed at the end of July. Last week, I scored a pretty decent deal (I think) on 35 square feet of mosaic tile for our kitchen backsplash project (clearance tile at Lowe's, got them down to about 5.50/sqft). The wife also threw in the idea of painting the kitchen to tie it all together.

We're still waiting for the tax return to get the rest of the tools, materials, and paint. We went with a basic glass mosaic 3/4" x 3/4" square tiles that are spaced by 1/8".

Here are a few of my worries:

1. The interior is a typical Las Vegas drywall/textured wall with rounded corner beads on 90* drywall joints. There is a window over the sink and since the window-sill has the corner beads, I'm not exactly sure how the tile would look butted up to the edge of the rounded corner of the window. (Pictures Attached)

Right now, the only remedy I'm thinking will look decent is if I use baseboard trim, or simply thin pieces of wood trim to "frame" in the window and create a type of window casing. I would paint it the color of the baseboards/doors in the house and cover up the rounded corner beads to make them square 90* bends. I would then have a nice flat border around the window that would butt up against the tile decently.

2. The wife and I are also torn about how far we should run the tile up the wall behind the sink. I'm thinking either to the bottom of the cabinets and keeping it level with the rest of the tile, or possibly running it up the side of the cabinet possibly an additional 6" or so.

3. Just a simple question: The wall texture is not very dramatic and the walls are pretty flat as it is... so am I okay simply applying mastic/thinset directly to the wall to adhere the tile?

Thanks for reading!
 
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Old 01-26-13, 04:58 AM
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Welcome to the forums! As long as your inside corners at either end of the countertop are not rounded, it will be easier to do. You didn't picture them. I would purchase matching bullnose flat tile and bring my finish line to the bottom of the cabinets, framing the area from the cabinets to within about 3/4" of the window (before it starts it's round off) and around the window opening.
 
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Old 01-26-13, 05:56 AM
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Post additional pictures with the window blinds in the up position so we can get a better look at the window itself. Would make it easier to offer suggestions.
 
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Old 01-27-13, 11:21 PM
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Thanks for the quick replies guys!

Larry,

I was leaning towards stopping the tile right before the rounded edge, and I am thinking it will be the better option. We are painting the walls a shade of green (Lowe's color called Guacamole) so I think this will help; especially since I was worried about the tile "abruptly" stopping. As far as a bullnose tile goes, I am not sure how that would work with this mosaic tile that we chose. The edges of the tiles not not very sharp or anything...they actually seemed to be pretty finished.

To answer your other question, the edges of the countertops have 90* edges on the existing "backsplash." (picture attached)

I am including some additional pictures to help you guys out. I am also wondering about the cabinets now...we opted for the bottom "light rail trim" to help conceal the under cabinet lighting, but that creates an extra little lip for the tile. I'm thinking that I should just line the edge of the tile with the bottom edge of these lips all the way around.

Thanks again!
 
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Old 01-28-13, 03:49 AM
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Oh, OK, glass tile. I think you will be fine ending it at the window opening as you said. I would wait until I had the tile in place before I installed the light skirt. You only need it on three sides, so waiting will allow you to cut it more precisely against the tile, saving a bunch of tile cutting. If you are wrapping it around the corners, I would stop it at the end of the splash.....that is if you are leaving it, which I would.
 
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Old 01-28-13, 06:05 AM
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I think it is time to break out the pencil and calculator and do some math. Lay out your mosaic tile flat on either the table, counter or floor. Use spacers so that the 1/8" grout line is maintained between sheets. Next start comparing various measurements to the actual tile. Measure distance from backsplash to under lip of cabinets - see how that comes out on the mosaic. Is it 1/4 piece of glass, 1/2 piece of glass or whatever. Then see how measurements would be left to right of the window and see where things lay in relation to the rounded corners of the drywall. You also would like the distance to rounded corner to match the distance to rounded corner for the backsplash up to rounded corner measurement.

If all the math works out and you can center the left/right - up/down on all the measurements then I would say proceed with leaving the rounded corners. If things get squirrelly on you you and you are looking at tiny slivers of glass instead of whole squares then I would consider trimming out the window. You would be better able to hide slivers of glass up against trim as opposed to free floating them.

BTW - you will need a wet saw with a good diamond blade to cut the glass tiles.
 
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Old 01-28-13, 09:50 AM
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We also have cabinets with the "light rails". When we did our tile job, we ran the tiles up to the bottom of the back face of the cabinets-going higher than the bottom of the light rails.We felt that this gave a cleaner look than stopping the tile at the bottom of the light rail, and having a small gap along the wall.

BTW:We trimmed the tiles to fit around the curved part of the light rail, except over the stove, where we had to cut a quarter inch off the back of the light rail (where it met the old wall) using an oscillating tool. [We were using 4x4 tiles with an offset seam pattern, so it may be easier/harder to do this using the smaller glass squares. ]
Good luck with your project, and let us see how it turns out.
 
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Old 03-14-13, 11:46 PM
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Picture Please :)

Would you mind posting a picture of the finished project showing how you addressed the bullnose corners on your windows? I am also looking to add a tiled backsplash in our kitchen and we have the same issue with the window over our sink.
 
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Old 03-15-13, 07:11 PM
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Would you mind posting a picture of the finished project showing how you addressed the bullnose corners on your windows?
You might have better luck if you send a PM to the member, rather than asking in a thread that was last active in January.
 
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