Tile over tile in bathroom?

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  #1  
Old 02-19-13, 03:31 PM
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Tile over tile in bathroom?

House was built in the 60's, extremely well maintained, all original bathrooms with small 1" square tiles on the floors. The floors look like the day they were installed, solid, not a single crack anywhere even in the grouting.

Were doing a make over. Regulating the tub, new toilet and vanity. Picked out a beautiful natural stone travertine. I'm told to go right over the old flooring, rather then dig it up.

Comments, advise appreciated.
 
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Old 02-19-13, 03:39 PM
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It might work but I wouldnt do it and I would think that it would raise the new bathroom flooring higher than the flooring that will but up to it at the door...
 
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Old 02-19-13, 03:51 PM
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The level would be even with the top of the sil already there.
What kind of job would I be looking at if I took up that floor?
 
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Old 02-19-13, 03:56 PM
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Good Scraping tool and you should be able to remove the old tiles in an hour or two if its an average sized bathroom.

Installing Durorock or Cement Board, maybe another two hours, cut it with an old blade on a skill saw..

Either way the toilet should also be removed, maybe 15 minutes out, 30 back in. Don't forget to install a new wax ring.

This could also eliminate the problem with the toilet flange being too low if added height from added tiles as well..
 
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Old 02-19-13, 04:24 PM
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I disagree that the tiles and base must be removed, maybe, but not a definite thing.

You didn't say what method of installation was used and you didn't say if there's a basement or crawl under or a slab. Need to know about the structure of the floor and I think I should be able to figure out the method.

Going over the old can work very well if everything is right.

Cal; you're making it sound a lot easier and faster than it really is. :NO NO NO: A novice isn't gonna remove all that in an hour or two. If it's on wood structure , there's mud and lath to remove. They'll then have to install plywood and then CBU. Either that or do another mud job which is the same as what was removed. Makes little sense to me.

Jaz
 
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Old 02-19-13, 05:16 PM
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I'd be inclined to remove it but that doesn't mean it has to be removed. Given that the height appears not to be an issue, I would follow up on the questions Jaz asked to see if leaving it is the right call.
 
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Old 02-19-13, 06:02 PM
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Jaz, basement under the bath. Subfloor (plywood) in pace but I've been told there may indeed be mud and lath down. I guess I'll get a better look once I remove the toilet. It really is a very solid floor, would that be beneficial to me to keep in place?
 
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Old 02-19-13, 06:05 PM
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Picture

Picture of the floor in question
 
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Old 02-19-13, 06:10 PM
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Underside

Sub floor view from basement
 
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Old 02-20-13, 09:09 AM
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Tom,

If the conditions are as you stated, you can go over those mosaics with new tiles to bring the room up to date. Use a high quality modified thinset mortar, there's many out there. It would be smart to first scuff the glazed with either a carborundum stone or better yet with a diamond cup on a side-grinder. Here's a cheap one; Search results for: 'diamond cup'

That will do it but you can also use this; Products

I've gone over old many times. Sometimes with only a cleaning and not even scuffing. Sometimes after using the diamond cup. (kinda dusty). And once using the cup and the Mapei primer. The Mapei Eco Prim Grip was introduced last year.

The only issue is that I think you should remove the marble threshold and end the tiles like this; see 1st pic.

BTW, this floor is installed over the old tiles that I had to grind cuz the tile guy did a poor job and had lots of lippage. I also used Eco Prim Grip.



Jaz
 
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  #11  
Old 02-20-13, 03:41 PM
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Jaz, Thank you for the sound advise and tip for the threshold, that looks great! Ive got a variable speed Makita so the cup seems logical.
 
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