old drywall to new drywall transition

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Old 02-09-14, 08:43 AM
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old drywall to new drywall transition

The lower half of my 1960s bathroom is all tile, while the upper half is drywall.
Doing a remodel soon, and intend to remove all the tile, and will retile around the tub area. For the areas where it will be a full wall of drywall after the remodel, should I rip out the entire upper half too, or is that not necessary? I'm worried about how good the transition would be from the new drywall to the older/painted drywall. I definitely don't want to vaguely see a transition line, and wondered what others have done in a similar situation.
 
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Old 02-09-14, 09:16 AM
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Got a picture?
There should be no drywall used in the wet area under tile.
Coming to need 1/2 cement based tile board.
Drywall is cheap an it's often easier to just start with new so your working with tapered seams.
 
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Old 02-09-14, 09:20 AM
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Yeah i know about not using drywall in the wet area, will be getting Durock for that.I'm talking about the non-wet areas where the previous owner/builder still decided to tile anyway. I'll get a pic and post soon.
So if I do take out the entire section top to bottom, would i leave the ceiling intact and use an oscillating tool to cut the vertical drywall from the ceiling?
 

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Old 02-09-14, 09:28 AM
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Leave the ceiling in tact.
There should just be some tape over the seam.
I find it easier to make a utility knife cut about 2" away from the wall an try and remove the tape and old drywall compound together so I have a low spot for the new tape.
Done right the ceiling should have been one first then the wall so holding your oscillating saw blade flush with the ceiling should make a clean cut through the paper tape.
 
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Old 02-09-14, 09:30 AM
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Here is a pic of a non-wet area, where the lower half is tiled:
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Old 02-09-14, 10:42 AM
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If I was a betting man, I would assume that there is drywall behind the tile in this bathroom. Only way to verify is knock off a few tiles and inspect. If that is the case, then you can easily get a crisp straight line cut on the drywall and forget having to remove the upper half. If you are lucky, you may even be able to find the seam between the upper sheet and the lower sheet and make your cut there. So be gentle taking off the bull nose. Cut the seam with a utility knife to break the caulking and use a stiff putty knife to see if you can pop them off easily. Once you have the bull nose off, you can score a line to disassociate the top drywall with the bottom and you can get more aggressive with the lower tile.
 
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Old 02-09-14, 10:42 AM
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There really isn't any hard set rule on how to do it. It is feasible to tape and mud the joint between the old and new and make it look good. A lot depends on how much work is involved. If the bottom comes off cleanly, I'd just drywall the bottom but if the top gets much damage during the demo - it might be easier to replace it all. One other reason to replace it all is if you need to update the insulation or wiring.
 
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Old 02-09-14, 12:08 PM
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Wow! All good advice. You asked what others have done. I had a similar situation. I removed all old drywall in the wet area and replaced with proper "wet" area board of whatever brand available at the time. In the none wet areas I was able to save most of the drywall but in those areas where I had to remove old stuff, I just butted up new drywall, taped and joint compounded it. Lots of sanding where joint showed and would not be covred wth anything but paint. Sometimes I had to expand the plaster patch over a wider area to help hide new joint. Turned out perfect. Remember, just the joint compond and plaster patch will show every minute detail and imperfection. When paint is applied it will all disapaer.
 
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Old 02-09-14, 12:27 PM
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Yeah the main reason I ask is because i am thinking about the "what ifs"...such as was drywall made to the same depth then (1960s) as it is now, and second, I don't know how many layers of paint is already on the wall...so if there are several layers, then i wasn't sure if that transition would be noticeable or not...I guess the only way to know for sure is when I actually remove it and butt them up together.
 
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Old 02-09-14, 12:42 PM
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One of the problems I found was putting new wallboard without the factory edge depression against old or even new cut wallboard to accept joint compound and be level with surface. What I did was to carefully dent the edges just enough without cracking it to allow the tape and filler to come up to level. I don't know if that's the pro way of doing it but it worked for me.
 
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Old 02-09-14, 12:47 PM
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Yeah I was thinking something along the same lines, that if the older was a little higher, I would bevel the edge with a sander and start maybe 8" above the seam and transition down so that the butted ends are perfectly even.
On the other hand, like the other guy mentioned, drywall is cheap, so if I'm that worried about it, just cut it all out.
 
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Old 02-10-14, 04:43 AM
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As far as I know, drywall thickness has remained constant over the years. You do of course have to make sure you get the right size. Most builders used 1/2" but occasionally you'll run into an old house where 3/8" was used. It also possible that the thicker 5/8" was used. You treat the joint like a butt joint when there aren't 2 factory beveled edges. It's never a good idea to compromise the paper face of the drywall. The only times I've ever intentionally put a 'dent' in drywall is when filling nail holes [used to hang pictures, etc]
 
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