removing & reinstalling ceramic tile


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Old 08-27-14, 11:39 AM
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removing & reinstalling ceramic tile

I have got to replace a 30x60 shower pan after only 18 months. Is there a practical way that I could just remove the bottom row of tile & backer board , reinstall new tile & backer board & not have to redo all of the tiled walls ?
Roger
 
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Old 08-27-14, 12:21 PM
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What type of waterproofing do the shower walls have? Removing the tile and a strip of backer is relatively easy. Putting something back and making it waterproof is the hard part.
 
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Old 08-27-14, 02:24 PM
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Describe better your issues and why you think it is the shower pan. Many times, issues are from using grout in the corners instead of flexible caulking, the grout cracks out and water can infiltrate. Pictures would help - http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html.
 
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Old 08-28-14, 12:55 PM
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After showering, we keep finding a small amount of water seeping from under the adjacent closet wall. As you can see in included pictures, I have a inner liner/ mortar pan. I have a feeling, that the pvc liner, either has a hole in it or there is a leak around the drain. I have lost all confidence in this type pan & am going to replace it with a solid one piece pan. Am I wrong in this conclusion ? The walls are constructed with Hardibacker board, thinset & then the tile.
Roger
 
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Old 08-28-14, 05:42 PM
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Do you have pics of the steps before this one? If you used the traditional method, it works 100% of the time, but only when done right. I prefer a Kerdi shower, but that's besides the issue. I can't tell what was done wrong from just that pic.

Have you tried capping the outlets and turning the water on?

I have lost all confidence in this type pan & am going to replace it with a solid one piece pan. Am I wrong in this conclusion ?
Yes you are, I think. You'd be going from a high end look to a cheap plastic that will probably look bad in 5 years. Don't blame the method, nothing wrong with the method. Post pics of the process if you have em.


Jaz
 
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Old 08-28-14, 06:26 PM
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I tried the "plug the drain & fill with 1" of water" test. After about 1.5 hours, there was the water seeping into the closet. I lost my confidence in this type pan construction, when I read all that can go wrong with it, ie..punctured liner, poor drain to liner seal, plugged weep holes, mold under the liner. It appears to me that this type pan requires a "true craftsman" when it has to be right the 1st time.
Unfortunately the only other pictures I have were of the plumbing & finished product.
The replacement pan I had in mind was porcelain over steel or a cast iron pan...not a good idea ??? I didn't like those cheap plastic pans either !
Oh...this was built on the concrete foundation.
Roger
 
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Old 08-28-14, 08:22 PM
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Well, if anything isn't done right it's gonna fail. The system is a good one. So now what if the new pan isn't done right?

You're gonna rip out the lower 1/3 and then try to get everything to match up again. Do you have enough of the original tiles and all the necessary trims? It's not that easy, but a pro can do it.

Jaz
 
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Old 08-29-14, 04:15 AM
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Have you tried unscrewing and resetting the tub spout. It looks like a screw in vs a soldered drop elbow in the wall for the rough in. I would use both teflon tape and teflon paste and make sure it is seated well. Do you have access to the area behind the faucet? You can also reset the shower arm using the double paste/tape method. Two known areas where leaks can occur.

On a slab, the area around the drain is usually a bit of a void where water can seep into the earth, seepage outside the drain area may come from other sources.
 
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Old 08-29-14, 07:55 AM
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I have enough tile to replace the bottom row, but will the hardiboard be usable after removing the tile ? If not, that means the new hardiboard will butt up against the old hardiboard...can this joint be made leak proof ? I have a small panel in the adjacent closet which allows me to see if the supply plumbing is leaking. Very frustrating problem !!
 
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Old 08-29-14, 05:33 PM
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You need more than just the bottom row. You're likely to break or at least chip some of the other tiles too. Don't try to remove the backer board even with that grout joint. All joints need to be taped and mudded as before.

...can this joint be made leak proof ?
I've got news for you. That joint is not leak proof now and neither is Hardie. Concrete backer is not what makes a tile installation waterproof. The reason for the mesh tape is to stiffen the sheets by making a solid piece on board. Did you install a vapor barrier behind the backer or use any kind of waterproofing at all?

Did you have to slice the membrane to fit around the curb/doorway? Did you apply the Redgard all over especially the curb? That's why I asked for pics cuz I have a strong feeling someone forget a step or two.

Since you have no more pics, take the time to describe every step of installation method in detail or go ahead and rip what you want and we'll try to help.

Oh....one more thought. Do they make the proposed pan in the right size and how about drain location. (Pisst) You will have a devil of a time going your route and making it work.

Jaz
 
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Old 08-30-14, 09:15 AM
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A small contractor (husband & wife team with great referrals) installed the whole shower . I know there was no vapor barrier installed...I had no idea one was needed.
When my bath wall was torn out, all it was was regular sheetrock with tile. .no vapor barrier. It lasted for 30 years with no water damage, guess I was lucky. My question is, where do I find a contractor with this expertise and will not do shoddy work just for the buck ? Most home owner don't know the difference.
 
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Old 08-30-14, 12:23 PM
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I know this sounds redundant, but would like you to perform a 2nd flood test. Plug the drain body completely, they make blow up balloons that fit into the drain that you inflate with a compressor of bike pump (available at plumbing supply houses). Plug the drain below the drain body in the pipe but under the level of the pan liner. Then Fill the shower with water FROM A 5 GALLON BUCKET that you filled from another area of the house, NOT the shower itself. This is a true way that shower pans are tested to see if they are water tight. I want to eliminate supply line leaks completely, and filling from a secondary supply will answer that question. If the water remains at a constant level overnight, the liner is intact and watertight and we look elsewhere.
 
 

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