Stone floor with wood inlays

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Old 11-11-14, 09:50 AM
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Stone floor with wood inlays

Hi,

I would like to do pretty much what is in this picture except instead of thin brick, I will be using stone. I removed the existing tiles and now just have the concrete slab exposed. Am I able to just use concrete board to lay the stones on as well as screw the wood inlays to? Do I need to put down a layer of plywood first?




Thanks
 
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Old 11-11-14, 10:15 AM
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Welcome to the forums.

You want neither plywood nor backer board on top of a concrete slab but wood on concrete should be pressure treated, which is neither pretty nor apt to stay straight.

Sit tight, some of the pros will have more to offer.
 
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Old 11-11-14, 10:18 AM
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You should not use or need cement board if you have concrete. Cement board is often used when there is a wood floor and you're putting tile on top of it.

One of your issues with rock and wood next to each other on a concrete floor may be moisture. Generally wood is not used in direct contact with cement because of rotting caused by water vapor/moisture passing through or wicked up by the concrete. Is there a vapor barrier under your concrete?
 
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Old 11-11-14, 10:30 AM
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To check for moisture from concrete tape a 1 foot by 1 foot square on floor and leave there a couple of days. If it gets wet you have a moisture problem.
 
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Old 11-11-14, 01:11 PM
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Thanks for the responses.

To check for moisture from concrete tape a 1 foot by 1 foot square on floor and leave there a couple of days. If it gets wet you have a moisture problem.
I've done this and let it sit for about 3 weeks. No moisture whatsoever.

Is there a vapor barrier under your concrete?
Under the concrete? I have no idea. It is just the slab.

This is why I'm confused. From my understanding, if I just was going to put down a wood floor, I would put down some kind of moisture barrier/underlayment and put the floor on top, after making sure the slab was level. If I was going to just put the stone down, I thought I could either just put it directly on the slab or add some layer, such as ditra, plywood, or cement board.

How should I go about doing this?
 
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Old 11-11-14, 01:43 PM
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Depends on weather you are going to have a floating floor or a glue down. With stone and wood I would guess a glue down would be best. The flooring experts will be in later and may have different ideas.
 
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Old 11-11-14, 01:52 PM
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It's not going to be easy. The tile needs to go down with thinset. The wood with something like Bostik's. It still may fail. The wood and tile will expand and contract at different rates. You will need to grout between the tiles and caulk between the wood and tile.
 
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Old 11-11-14, 03:02 PM
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Do you have your materials for the floor? How thick is your stone and how thick is your wood? What type of wood are you using?
 
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Old 11-12-14, 04:40 AM
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Do you have your materials for the floor? How thick is your stone and how thick is your wood? What type of wood are you using?
The stone tile is 3/8" thick. I planned on using 1x4s for the inlays.

There has to be a smart way to do this, right? Can I just "reverse" the process of people doing wooden floors with tile inlays? I've seen articles on that.

I really appreciate your responses. I'm stuck on this planning phase.
 
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Old 11-12-14, 03:31 PM
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Must you use wood? It will inherently cause problems between the two products. Have you given consideration to wood toned ceramic tile? I installed it in a hallway and it is really good looking. Daltile Parkwood Cherry 7 in. x 20 in. Ceramic Floor and Wall Tile (10.89 sq. ft. / case)-PD14720HD1P2 at The Home Depot
 
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Old 11-13-14, 05:38 AM
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Must you use wood? It will inherently cause problems between the two products. Have you given consideration to wood toned ceramic tile? I installed it in a hallway and it is really good looking. Daltile Parkwood Cherry 7 in. x 20 in. Ceramic Floor and Wall Tile (10.89 sq. ft. / case)-PD14720HD1P2 at The Home Depot
I've looked at that kind of tile before for another room, but didn't think about it for this. Thanks for the idea. Did you install directly on the slab?
 
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Old 11-13-14, 10:07 AM
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Tony,

Chandler's suggestion is the way to go. You other plan will not work so good.

Jaz
 
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