Bullnose or Cut tile for the wall for a clean appearance


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Old 01-23-15, 01:23 PM
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Question Bullnose or Cut tile for the wall for a clean appearance

Hi All,
I have completed tiling the bathroom and have a question as to what has to be used on the wall where the floor meets the wall. Do we use bull nose or the tile itself cut into thin pieces.
It just does not look clean as the way it is now.
Attached is a pic for better understanding my question.
Thanks.
BV
 
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Old 01-23-15, 01:25 PM
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Most people would use a standard baseboard molding made from wood. Some even add a shoe molding to that to dress out any areas that are visible due to high and low spots on the floor relative to the stiff molding. Caulk the molding to the wall, paint the molding to finish.
 
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Old 01-23-15, 03:44 PM
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Old 01-23-15, 04:04 PM
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Hard to tell what you have going on for that fuzzy picture.
Sure looks like it was installed to close to the bottom plate.
To close and the tiles going to tent, (buckle).
Baseboard, Sanitary tile baseboard, your choice.
 
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Old 01-23-15, 06:34 PM
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Hi BV,

Sorry guys but I disagree with all 3 suggestions on which base to use.

Although some people do use wood base in bathrooms, (cheaper, easier perhaps), I think you should use ceramic that match your floor. Either the 3" high bullnose that's often available, or cut 3" or so from scraps that have one factory edge or cut two pieces from a full tile. Factory edge up of course. This option is not as good as the bullnose but works well and is a 'standard' in the industry when bullnose isn't available or to save $$$.

Sorry, but regular ceramic 4x6" sanitary base will look awkward with these tiles. The sanitary base is a match for ceramic wall tiles.

I agree with Joe that it looks like it's too close to the wall and should not have been grouted. (if that's grout and not chalk).

Jaz
 
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Old 01-23-15, 06:41 PM
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I vote for the tile base with factory edge up, as Jaz said. I think the factory edge actually looks better than a bullnose. It can be finished off with matching caulk or beveled grout fill.
 
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Old 01-23-15, 07:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Brian
I vote for the tile base with factory edge up,
Many people also paint the top after grouting. Otherwise try to select tiles that have some glaze on the edges. Usually two sides of each tile have at least some glaze due to the way they were sprayed.

Jaz
 
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Old 01-24-15, 03:25 AM
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Good advice. The only reason I mentioned sanitary base was the possibility of aberrations in the tile along the floor line. We only saw a few inches of it. If there were larger gaps, the bullnose may not cover it completely, whereas the flare of the sanitary base may help.
 
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Old 01-24-15, 06:25 AM
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I guess everyone has their own style, I tend to think that a tile baseboard installation using regular cut tile looks too commercial for a residential setting. Then you have the question of do you stagger the grout lines relative to the floor, or do you line them up. I've done both and will still gravitate to the standard colonial base with shoe molding.

The OP has a wood plank looking floor that lends itself well to a standard wood baseboard and shoe look.
 
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Old 01-24-15, 06:51 AM
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You could also do a tile base and dress the top edge with an aluminum molding found in the tile dept.
 
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Old 01-31-15, 01:12 PM
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The reason I always installed a wooden baseboard and shoe molding in all of my bathrooms was because my bathroom floors were always sheet vinyl. The wall tiles wrapped around the side of the bathtub and extended down to the top of the baseboard. Then I'd caulk between the top of the baseboard and the cut bottoms of the wall tiles with silicone caulk.

Doing it that way allowed me to replace those vinyl floors easily by just removing the shoe molding.
 
 

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