Flooring options for indoor porch workshop

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-21-15, 08:59 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Question Flooring options for indoor porch workshop

Hello! I am in the midst of replacing the original, rotted out floor in my porch and am having trouble deciding on how to finish the floor. It is a small 12x6 72 sq. ft. area that I also use as my workshop for various mechanical and fabrication projects as I do not currently have an outdoor shed or shop of my own (yet).

The floor is 2x6, 16" on center with 3/4" ply and I would want something durable ontop that could withstand dropped tools, occasional spot welding and plenty of foot traffic. Low to moderate cost of product is also desirable.

I was initially thinking of something along the lines of a concrete board base followed by a garage-style epoxy coating ontop, but the only type of flooring I have personally installed and am familiar with myself are vinyl tiles. I consider myself fairly handy but this is new territory for me, so would appreciate any hints or guidance directed my way before I get started!

Many thanks!
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-21-15, 09:02 AM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,308
Received 46 Votes on 43 Posts
Welcome to the forums.

Rubber flooring would be my first choice, everything else I can think of wouldn't stand up to what you're describing for the conditions. I don't see the rubber lasting forever, either, but dropping tools on it seems least destructive this way.

Pulpo is a big fan of this flooring, hang tight and I think he'll be able to provide a link or two.
 
  #3  
Old 10-21-15, 12:04 PM
czizzi's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 7,376
Received 9 Votes on 7 Posts
Which way do the floor joists run? Are the 2x6 joists 6 ft long or 12 ft long? If 6 ft, they are within specs for tile. I would add 1/2" ply then work on the cement backer and tile. Then you could put down the anti-fatigue mats that would be similar to rubber flooring.
 
  #4  
Old 10-21-15, 12:06 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,063
Received 120 Votes on 107 Posts
Being a little on the cheap side I'd just paint the plywood floor every so often. Rubber mats won't like getting hit with the random sparks from welding
 
  #5  
Old 10-21-15, 12:32 PM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,308
Received 46 Votes on 43 Posts
I don't normally disagree with Z but I don't see ceramic holding up well if wrenches and hammers are getting dropped on it.
 
  #6  
Old 10-21-15, 01:31 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the replies so far! In response to the ones posted...

If stickshift is referring to those square rubber mats that interlock with one another, I have tried a few of those in the past and they do not like welding sparks or solder drips at all, so it won't do for my particular needs.

To czizzi, my joists run 6 feet across and not 12, so the floor is quite strong but I don't see ceramic tiles being ideal for this application myself, as stickshift replied they would not handle tool impacts very well. As careful as I try to be, I will occasionally drop a wrench or hammer now and then as I work.

Marksr's suggestion of painting the plywood would be fine, but I'd want something a little more resilient than regular paint. Are there any products that could be similarly applied to bare plywood and yet offer a more durable surface?
 
  #7  
Old 10-21-15, 01:39 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,063
Received 120 Votes on 107 Posts
An oil base floor enamel [or epoxy] would be the most durable type of paint but all paint type coatings are subject to wear both from traffic and abuse [dropping heavy objects ] Going that route would mean repainting at some point.
 
  #8  
Old 10-21-15, 02:02 PM
czizzi's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 7,376
Received 9 Votes on 7 Posts
I don't normally disagree with Z but I don't see ceramic holding up well if wrenches and hammers are getting dropped on it.
Thought process was to get a solid floor and then cover with a temp. area rug, or mat or something that would absorb the impact of the tools. I guess you are a little rougher on the floor than normal. Any floor would have to deal with sparks and solder drops.

In your house? I got this mad scientist vibe working in my head....
 
  #9  
Old 10-21-15, 02:45 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I work on many projects, including but not limited to rebuilding small engines, manufacturing small to medium-sized steel items, wire soldering, and aluminum smelting and casting. I don't have a garage or outdoor workshed but can get most of my work done outdoors in the summer, weather permitting - but during the winter, am forced to work indoors in my tiny porch.

And why does every scientist have to be 'mad' in such applications? I resent that implication, and plan to use my completed death ray on those who label me as such first! hehe!

But again, thanks for the replies. I think I'll go with a few layers of gray epoxy-based paint. That should do the trick!
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: