How do I start to lay 16 x 16 ceramic tile and find center

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-29-15, 04:57 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 1
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
How do I start to lay 16 x 16 ceramic tile and find center

I am tiling a small condo, 800 sq. ft. The hallway is 41.5 inches in width. Do I start at the doorway or the center of the living room where the hallway meets. First timer.
 
  #2  
Old 12-29-15, 05:17 PM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 9,474
Received 291 Votes on 261 Posts
You can do a rough calculation so that the edge of tile should be at least one half or bigger on either side of the wall or any entrance or threshold. You will want to factor in the width of you grout line also.

I always laid out one row and column of tiles dry as a test run. Then make adjustments so that the edges will be proper. I also usually started in the middle of the room and worked to one corner then back to the middle to adjacent corner. Others start from one edge and work out. The only problem with that approach is if the walls are not square and wall edge is used as a straight edge, the whole room will look slanted or crooked when the opposite or adjacent wall is reached.
 
  #3  
Old 12-29-15, 05:32 PM
P
Temporarily Suspended
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NY
Posts: 10,982
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I've seen/heard people argue over how to start a tile job.
In the dispute, both sides agreed to snap a center line in both directions. One side said to center one tile exactly where the two lines meet. The other side said that's almost impossible & said to put four tiles so that the corner of each tile meets where the lines cross.

A third person who was not part of that debate said to lay two rows of tile against one wall & two rows of tile against one of the walls that's on a 90 degree angle, with the first wall. In other words, two rows of tile on two walls that make an L. Their claim was that it reduces the amount of cuts, at the end.
 
  #4  
Old 12-29-15, 05:49 PM
Norm201's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: United States
Posts: 9,474
Received 291 Votes on 261 Posts
A third person who was not part of that debate said to lay two rows of tile against one wall & two rows of tile against one of the walls that's on a 90 degree angle, with the first wall. In other words, two rows of tile on two walls that make an L. Their claim was that it reduces the amount of cuts, at the end.
That is pretty much how I look at it. But it gives you a chance to adjust a row or column if tile falls short at one edge.
 
  #5  
Old 12-31-15, 09:10 AM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 19,609
Received 97 Votes on 85 Posts
I always start with a dry layout and adjust until it pleases the eye.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: