new shower-budget


  #1  
Old 04-22-01, 09:20 PM
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I just bought a new house and on inspection discovered that the basement level bathroom shower is finished. There is no grout left, and the tiles depress easily when you push on them, indicating severe water damage. The wall is dry now because the previous owners did not use the shower. The inspector recommended re-doing the whole thing. Since I just bought this house I am on a budget, but I need the shower to function because I am going to be renting out the basement.
I was going to rip down the existing tile and remove the gyprock (whatever that is!?) by myself, then consider hiring a contractor to do the rest. This shower is an odd shape so pre-made molded shower stall would not fit.
Any suggestions to make this shower functional on a budget? How hard would it be to do the tiling myself/how long would it take?
Thanks
Caroline
 
  #2  
Old 04-23-01, 03:01 PM
J
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Hi Caroline,

When you said "gyprock," I knew you were in Canada (not that it matters). Down here (Texas) we call it sheetrock. By any description, though, it's a very poor material to back up a tile installation in a shower.

Tearing the old stuff out (right down to the studs and floor) will save you two or three hundred (American). There are any number of people doing their own showers at any given time. If you are "handy" with tools, you can probably do it. It will take you quite a while, though. There are a lot of steps.

Do-it-yourselfers these days use cement backer board for the walls, a vast improvement over "gyprock." The shower floor must still be built with wet cement mortar, but advice is out there on that issue as well. In fact, there is a Canadian pro who answers questions here frequently. Goes by "Adanac." He'll show up.

Stopped in Calgary last summer. Quite impressive, especially when you look off to the west and see the mountains.

Come back with more questions.

John

http://www.johnbridge.com
 
  #3  
Old 04-25-01, 07:56 PM
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Hi
Any work you can do your self is going to save you money, but doing the tile your self, especially a shower, probably isn't a good idea..Not that you couldn't do it..but there's a lot of work involved to make sure it lasts more than a year or two. You may want to do some reading on the subject to see what your getting into..."Ceramic Tile Setting" by John Bridge is a good one,and available at Chapters in Canada.(it's actually cheaper in Canada too..don't tell John)At least if you decide to have someone else do your shower, you'll have a basic knowledge of how it "should" be done.Any thing less than Concrete board on the walls is a NO NO. Price?..a 3'x3' shower..with basic 4"x4" tile..probably close to $1000cdn...which is why most people are putting in fiberglass units.
 
  #4  
Old 04-26-01, 02:38 PM
J
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$1000 Canadian for a shower is cheap. We charge a minimum of $2000 American. Of course our showers are built using the mud method, and they will truly last forever. Well, they'll last longer than I will . . . I charge $850 (including material) for a mud tub surround/tub shower. That includes tearing out the old stuff.

And you know, I've never thought about the fact that my book sells at a lower price in Canada when you take in the rate of exchange factor. You folks are getting one heck of a bargain up there. No wonder my royalty check has been dwindling. My wife simply deposited the last one. She said it wasn't even worth going out to spend.

John (hoping a bunch of Canadians buy the book and make my wife happy) Bridge
 
 

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