Stairway skirt board

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Old 02-27-17, 07:58 AM
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Stairway skirt board

I'm in the midst of a basement remodel, everything is going smooth except this problem in the stairway. I ripped out the wood paneling that ran the length of the stairs, from the ground to the top treads, on both sides. My plan is to drywall the stairwell.

The width between the treads/risers and studs is between 1/2' to 1/4". I don't think ripping out the carpet, cutting the treads/risers back, then reinstalling the carpet will turn out. Are there any other options to either get a skirt to fit or sliding drywall down the gap?

Thanks for the help!
 
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Old 02-27-17, 08:09 AM
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With careful measuring, you can notch the skirt around the treads and risers. Start with a chalk line that is about 2" above the tops of the nosing. Mark a plumb line that represents the front of the nosing. Transfer those marks to the new piece. Use those points of reference to make your other measurements.
 
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Old 02-27-17, 08:23 AM
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I have read many articles/message boards on carefully notching a skirt board to fit around each individual step. I think it would be possible but the chances of it turning out nice are low! Is there a material or different technique that I could use to slide a skirt board between the studs and stairs?
 
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Old 02-27-17, 08:27 AM
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Old 02-27-17, 08:29 AM
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Some of it is skill but most of it just comes down to a willingness to apply the advice and follow directions.

You just got done saying you didnt want to cut the treads back... 1/4" obviously is not enough room to slide a 3/4" thick board in.
 
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Old 02-27-17, 08:31 AM
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Do you have any pictures or articles with your advice? To help me visualize the measuring.
 
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Old 02-27-17, 03:44 PM
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This is not as complicated as you think, it is just tedious.

If there is still drywall on the wall, you can snap a chalk line on the wall, 2" above the stair nosing, to represent the top edge of where you want the skirt to be. You would just need to make vertical marks on the wall (with a pencil and your level) that intersect your chalk line to represent where the front of each stair nose is. (the top corner / leading edge of each tread). See this image if you need help visualizing it.

All the measurements you take will be based on how far things are from that chalk line... along with the actual rise and run which you find with the framing square.

If the drywall is gone, you can accomplish the same thing by taking your new board and tacking it to the wall temporarily. Let it rest right on the stairs... directly above where it is going to be. Do the same thing, mark all your stair nose edges vertically with the level, marking right on the board with your pencil... take measurements along that vertical line... make a drawing in a notebook then transfer those measurements onto your board.

You just need to visualize that as long as all your measurements are based on a single point... directly above the corner of each stair tread, (whether it's 2" above or 12" above) you aren't going to have any problem. The whole thing is going to drop down equally based on the measurements you take with the framing square. You just need to make sure you hold one leg of the framing square along your plumb line... then add in any variation that you find around the "edges" of the framing square as it sits on each step.

This is way easier to do than it is to explain.
 
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Old 02-27-17, 05:45 PM
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Since you have 1/4 inch, you could slide in a strip of hardboard or 1/4 mdf, wedge it against the treads and risers, and trace the edges of the treads and risers on the template. Cut it out, test fit and trim where needed, and then use that as a template to mark the real skirt.

It will take longer than X's method, but it will give you good results with minimal chance of blowing it.
 
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Old 02-27-17, 06:02 PM
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That's cheating, Paul... but a really good idea.
 
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