Tiling existing into addition - need an opinion, please

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Old 03-24-17, 01:24 PM
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Tiling existing into addition - need an opinion, please

Hello. We are putting a new addition on and there was a bit (1/4") of a step from the existing interior down into the new space. I laid the cement board and was able to remove the “step” from the old to the new.

Here is the overview:

https://1drv.ms/i/s!AuZ4nzjfOYaI9Sanrh7wOtWWMVWh

As you can see in this picture:

https://1drv.ms/i/s!AuZ4nzjfOYaI9ScHC7cBSsIrfQfj

it is a bit unlevel as it goes out to the new area. In this picture you can see there is about 1/8” gap under the tile that spans across that divide in the new area:

https://1drv.ms/i/s!AuZ4nzjfOYaI9SiSlCC87XH5M8gU

My plan was to try to level out that tile as much as possible to prevent it from rocking (and therefore cracking) and then slowly taper the next one down to bring it where it needs to be, so-on. Does this seem viable using thinset or do I need to try and level that out before going to thinset (is the gap too large) – is my question. I just don’t want the tile to break.

Thanks in advance!
 
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Old 03-24-17, 03:50 PM
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Often using thinset properly will help with such aberrations in the floor height. You will need to be careful and do it consistently across the opening so the dip is not noticeable.
 
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Old 03-24-17, 04:24 PM
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1/8" is not much as long as you can taper it down over as much distance as possible.
 
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Old 03-24-17, 04:59 PM
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Need a longer straightedge to really see what is going on with the whole floor system. The addition should be level but more like a 6 foot level will tell you more.
 
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Old 03-24-17, 07:08 PM
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Hello:

Thanks for the assistance!

Quick update - I decided to try dry-fitting the tile tonight using shims, where necessary to get an idea of what I was dealing with.

Here is a pic: https://1drv.ms/i/s!AuZ4nzjfOYaI9SyHnyKFRcwpLUcF

The issue is with the existing floor. The new addition checks fine with a level in all directions. The existing floor (about 25 years old) has a slight bow in it across the subfloor (left to right in this picture - I noticed it when I was putting hardwood in the other room). It actually spans from front to back and I would guess it is normal from settling over the years. If you look at the picture - on the right side where the fridge is the bow is settled out and it goes slightly uphill towards the vent in the floor where it starts to make it's way back down.

If you look at the photo - on the right, I can go two tiles out and be at new floor level (no shims) and it's all happy. On the left, I need to go 4 tiles out to get to that same result. The left most tile (next to the vent) actually ends up being 1/4" off the new floor. So I have to run it much longer to get down to the new. I can't go much further! So, knowing that we're now dealing with 1/4" - 5/16" as we get into the closets, is this still something I can deal with thinset? Or is it time to call in the pros?

Thanks so much!
 
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Old 03-25-17, 02:51 AM
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I think, from your description, you can handle it with thinset and the shim packs. Just make sure you have enough thinset to make a solid base once the tiles are placed on it. Usually the 1/4" thinset you would normally trowel on, plus a little back buttering of the tiles as needed will do the trick.
 
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Old 03-25-17, 03:25 AM
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Still having a bit of difficulty visualizing what issues you have. If the tiles are floating because there is a dip in the floor under them, then you can use SLC on top of the wonder board to bring it more to level. Treat the closet as its own space. If overall it is level then it is separated enough to not interfere with the rest of the floor. If the problem s a hump, then take out some of the wonder board, pound in some wire mesh and pour some SLC to make it right.

Another observation has to do with how you attached the wonderboard to the subfloor. To be honest, It looks like every screw is overdriven and has broken through the top layer of mesh which weakens the holding power and you will end up with issues down the road. Wonderboard/Durock screws sit flush with the surface of the CBU and are relatively hard to over drill. You also need to thinset and mesh tape all the seams between the cuts and edges to tie the floor together as one.
 
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Old 03-25-17, 05:23 AM
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Those screws! They are the durock screws and maybe it was the cordless drill but, my goodness, half the time they wouldn't seat in at all. Then I'd have a screw head sticking out. In some cases they are in too far, yes. I had the tape here, too and was planning to put that on when I tile.

The issue is not a dip, its the rise in the existing subfloor and trying to match up with the existing tile. I cannot envision any way to remove the height as ir spans the entire existing floor so, as i see it, i have to feather out the difference gradually.

Nevertheless, i feel i may be a bit over my comfort level at this point and will likely pay the money to let a pro finish the job.

Thanks all.
 
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Old 03-25-17, 03:59 PM
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The screw heads that sit on top of the durock are buried in the thinset when you tile. Buy sinking them into the product you negate the top mesh layer (strength) and could have issues later on. I had a client that had a series of cracked tiles fixed twice before I was called in. The "contractor" (used lightly) had used deck screws and destroyed the durock. I backed all those screws out, added the correct fasteners and re-meshed the area with thinset before proceeding with the tile replacement. I talked to the contractor as I was introduced to him and mentioned the issue. He really had no clue - he worked for somebody else and was contracting on the side for extra money. Know who you hire! Don't go with the cheapest. Go to a tile store and ask for recommendations, they know who is good and who is not.
 
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