Permabase odor

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  #1  
Old 10-10-17, 06:24 PM
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Permabase odor

I'm in the process of installing a new shower using permabase ultra as the underlayment for the tile. Is there any way to get rid of the odor from the permabase? It's a very strong smell and makes it hard to breath at times. It might be a few weeks until I can get the tile up (assuming that will stop the odor).

I had the thought of skimming over the permabase with a mortar or thinset to help trap in the odor. Has anyone had to deal with this before?
 
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Old 10-10-17, 06:47 PM
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I've never used that product but I'm familiar with outgassing. Most products outgas, some worse than others. The way you describe it, I doubt that you can stop it. Either use something else or wear a mask. I don't mean a dust mask. You need something heavy duty. If there is a window, open it & maybe install an exhaust fan.
 
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Old 10-10-17, 06:58 PM
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I understand the gassing off part. I assume once the tile is up, it won't be an issue as it will trap the odor in. It's the time between that's going to be an issue. I've closed the bathroom off to the rest of the house and semi sealed the door.

I've already cut and installed two out of three walls so I don't think returning it is an option.
 
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Old 10-10-17, 07:06 PM
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You didn't help yourself by stopping the air flow into the bathroom. I understand that you want to stop the odor from travelling but it's not worth your health. Open as many windows & doors as you can while you finish the job.
 
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Old 10-10-17, 08:37 PM
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I agree, ventilation is needed. You can usually remove one of the window sashes, or open a storm window and insert a piece of plywood (cut to fit) with a hole in it so that a fan can blow that air OUT.

Then insert a portable ventilator (a box fan or something similar to this) or its duct work into the hole in the plywood. Creating negative pressure and ventilating the area 24/7 is mandatory when dealing with certain products that either create dust or offensive odors.
 
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Old 10-11-17, 08:22 AM
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I have an outside door and a window in the bathroom that I open along with running a fan while I'm working in the area. I've been closing the bathroom door to the interior of the house when not in use.
 
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Old 10-11-17, 10:17 AM
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Yes... sounds like you need to put that fan in the window, blowing outward, and let it run 24/7... not just when you are in there.
 
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Old 10-11-17, 01:21 PM
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Odors are particulate and the more airflow you can create, the faster you exhaust the supply of particles.
 
  #9  
Old 10-11-17, 01:24 PM
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Thanks for the input. Will see what I can rig up until I'm ready for tile.
 
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