Industrial slate

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  #1  
Old 04-17-18, 11:54 PM
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Industrial slate

I have acquired some slate panels from an old factory shower room ( 1" thick x 3 6" x 8 4" + /- ) that I want to use for a bathroom floor and shower area in my home, what is the best way to deal them and when installing them do I grout the joints or use something else?
 
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Old 04-18-18, 02:16 AM
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Welcome to the forums!
I'm a painter not a tile guy [they should be along later] but I'd assume you'd grout the joints. Are these tiles sealed or is it bare granite?
 
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Old 04-18-18, 09:23 AM
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First thanks for your response, they are not " tiles" but 3',x7' x1" panels that I'll probably bolt to the walls and lay in sand? on the floor not sure about ceiling. Want to know what to seal them with and is grout the way to go with vertical joints between panels. Planning on sealing cement board on walls then putting slate over that to keep water tite. should floor be sand or cement for water tightness of both?
 

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Old 04-18-18, 09:28 AM
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Your water barrier would be several coats of Redgard over your properly prepared cement board. I don't know what you would use other than grout.

The cement floor would be presloped to your drain and waterproofed with redgard. Or use a membrane like Ditra.
 
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Old 04-18-18, 09:38 AM
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Slate

That's what I thought, as for the floor would it be best to put cement down to get the slope to drain, channel drain at one end, sealer then a sand bed with slate on top since the panels are so big?
 
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Old 04-18-18, 09:41 AM
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I'm not sure this will apply but it's worth a "heads up".

In a reconstruction project someone salvaged the old marble slab dividers from a restroom to use in a way similar to what you are proposing. What he did not realize is that the marble was porous and over the many years it was in place it absorbed overspray from urinals and toilets. When he installed it in his home the smell of urine became obvious and was impossible to remove or mask..

The slate you have may not be as porous but if it is whatever use it previously saw may still be with you.

Good luck with your project.
 
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Old 04-18-18, 09:46 AM
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You would set them in thinset, not on sand. If you were making a sidewalk outside, you might put them on crushed rock and sand.
 
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Old 04-18-18, 12:03 PM
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Thanks for the heads up but my slate came from an old brass manufacturer and these were showers on the furnace floor in case of an accident. I've also had them in the garage for two plus years and no smell, but appreciate the warning.
 
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Old 04-18-18, 04:23 PM
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Thank you Xsleeper for setting me straight and thank you all for the advice will make the project that much easier.
 
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Old 04-18-18, 07:35 PM
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One more thing what S the best way to seal the slate before the install?
 
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Old 04-18-18, 07:37 PM
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You seal the slate and grout AFTER the install.
 
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Old 04-19-18, 02:53 AM
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I remember with terracotta tile you needed to seal it both before and after installation to prevent the grout from staining the tile - would that not be a concern with slate?
 
  #13  
Old 04-19-18, 09:07 PM
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You can seal the slate beforehand, but if you keep it clean as you go, you wouldn't have to. If you were using a colored grout that might stain the slate, or if you are a little messy then yes, it would probably be a good idea to seal it beforehand.
 
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