Help Patching Drywal/Tile In Shower

Reply

  #1  
Old 07-14-18, 07:06 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Washington DC Metro Area
Posts: 57
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Help Patching Drywal/Tile In Shower

Background:

The tiles in my shower around the faucets were cracked and glued back to one another in that area around the faucets. So they leak water to the next floor causing damage. Upon removal of these broken tiles, it appears a piece of drywall is was removed behind these tiles in the space around the faucets and up. I think a chunk of the drywall was removed from behind during some plumbing work at some point, and now the tiles have nothing to properly adhere to so they leak/crack.

I just need to repair this long enough to have a working shower while my other bathroom is being renovated over the next year or so. It doesn't have to be perfect, but I can't have water damage from it. I will eventually renovate this one too, but after the other is done.


What I've done so far:


I have removed the rest of the tile and drywall on that side of the shower with the faucets. I patched the new piece of greenboard in where the missing drywall was, screwed it to studs, and mudded with 20 min hotmud/fiber tape. It came out solid! When I redo this bathroom, I will do all cement board, but for now, I used greenboard to match what is already around it so lets not argue this choice.


Here is where I need help...

(1) To start, what kind of adhesive should I use for the shower tile? Thinset, though not as sticky as mastic seems better in showers but I hear tiles can slide... what do you do about that? If I go with thinset, what kind should I get?

(2) Should I start from bottom and work up with tile, leaving a 1/4" gap for caulk and prevention of water wicking? Sound right

(3) I will have more questions, but any other pointers/suggestions at the point I'm at?

Thanks!!
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 07-14-18, 08:40 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,120
Received 193 Votes on 179 Posts
Well, even if it's temporary, I would still suggest you get some Redguard and roll a couple coats on over the drywall. You say you dont want it to leak, so thats why. Then depending on the size of your tile (you didnt say what you are using) use Versabond thinset... the dry powder you mix yourself.

1/4" is a little much unless that is the size of all your grout joints. I would space the tile 1/8". Your drywall (which as you pointed out should have been tile backer) is what would usually be spaced away from the tub rim.

Before you put your handle escutcheons and spout back on, be sure you have waterproofed those penetrations in the tile with a product like kerdifix sealant.

Depending on the type of tile you are using and your grout spacing you may or may not want to use spacers.
 
  #3  
Old 07-14-18, 09:57 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Washington DC Metro Area
Posts: 57
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the reply! OK, I'll consider a coat on the greenboard 1st, and I can go 1/8" spacing from tile to tub. The tiles I'm using are standard 4x4 ceramic tiles and the trim pieces around the edges. So I'm assuming 1/8" spacing? I looked at the Versabond thinset and their little video. Will this be like quick hotmud I used on the joints or slow setting? Also, will the sticking be less than something like mastic and require worrying about tiles sliding?
 
  #4  
Old 07-15-18, 02:57 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,063
Received 120 Votes on 107 Posts
4" tiles typically butt up together with a little lip/tab that keeps the spacing correct. I've never heard of a 4" tile sliding down the wall.
 
  #5  
Old 07-15-18, 07:38 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Washington DC Metro Area
Posts: 57
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Are you referring to the tile with built in spacer bubs? The ones I'm purchasing don't have the two nubs on each side so I was assuming I would need spacers... Is that wrong? Doesn't seem like hardly any room for grout.

Also, the sliding I was reading about with using thinset was from the weight of all the tiles above it which can cause things to slide down a bit withing an hour or so of laying the tiles. This seemed directed at noobs so I wanted to understand.

If I can just but 4x4 up against each other regardless of built in spacer nubs and use thinset without the worry the weight of the tiles will cause some gravitational sliding, then this will be much easier.
 
  #6  
Old 07-15-18, 09:22 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,063
Received 120 Votes on 107 Posts
If there are no nubs on the edge of the tile then you'd need to space them yourself. While I don't do a lot of tile work I've worked around tile guys a lot. Never known them to have any issues with small tiles although the larger tiles sometimes do take more work to keep them from sliding under their own weight.
 
  #7  
Old 07-21-18, 06:55 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Washington DC Metro Area
Posts: 57
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I am ready to begin the tile work this weekend! Since the dry mix comes in a 50lb bag and is hard to deal with, I wanted to know what the reason is to use to the Versabond thinset recommended above is over the premixed stuff available at Home Depot? Is it because this is going to be installed in the shower area?
 
  #8  
Old 07-21-18, 08:39 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,120
Received 193 Votes on 179 Posts
I guess it's temporary, use whatever you want. The premix stuff just doesn't cure quickly. Thinset does.
 
  #9  
Old 07-21-18, 09:48 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Washington DC Metro Area
Posts: 57
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the reply! Do you mean the dry does, or is the premix is not thinset?
 
  #10  
Old 07-21-18, 10:14 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,120
Received 193 Votes on 179 Posts
Premix is not thinset. If it was, it would dry inside the bucket. The premix is a mastic and takes way longer to dry... especially when you have the redgard behind it it can't dry back into the wall.
 
  #11  
Old 07-23-18, 09:01 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Washington DC Metro Area
Posts: 57
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Doh! Yes, you are right. Well for that reason, I took your 1st advice and went with the 50lb bag of dry thinset. I am setting tile now and about to have fun cutting holes for the valves.

OK, next question... I leaving between a 1/8th and 1/4th" gap at bottom row of tiles (gap between the tiles and the tub), and at the corner that meets the adjacent wall. Do I want to grout then caulk these gaps, or is a good caulk all that's required for corner and bottom gaps? I have read that expansion/contraction will crack grout in these areas, but not sure if there is benefit to grouting then caulking over top of just going with caulk.

Thanks again!!
 
  #12  
Old 07-23-18, 11:14 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,120
Received 193 Votes on 179 Posts
1/4" gap with foam backer rod behind and caulk would be best. They make caulk to match grout and it's in the grout aisle, not the caulk aisle. On corners I have filled with grout then caulk.
 
  #13  
Old 08-04-18, 02:01 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Washington DC Metro Area
Posts: 57
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
OK, tiles are installed... next up is grouting my 1/8th" tile spacings. I am using an unsanded dry grout requiring mixing with water to use. My question now is, do I have to seal it after? A guy at the Home Depot said sealers are really only for preventing stains and helping to keep mold down. Is that true or do I need to apply a sealer to the grout to prevent moisture ingress?

Thanks again!!
 
  #14  
Old 08-05-18, 03:08 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,063
Received 120 Votes on 107 Posts
Moisture mitigation takes place behind the tiles; either with a barrier behind the cement board or redgard over it.
 
  #15  
Old 08-05-18, 12:25 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Washington DC Metro Area
Posts: 57
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Per the above thread, this wall is done the way things were done in the mid 90s with greenboard and no seal barrier like redgard. My question is, does grout have to be sealed after installing it to gain water barrier properties or is sealing just for mold/stain resistance? A guy at the Home Depot said sealers are really only for preventing stains and helping to keep mold down. Is that true or do I need to apply a sealer to the grout to prevent moisture ingress? I don't recall people doing that to grout as a final step in the 90s.
 
  #16  
Old 08-05-18, 01:59 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,120
Received 193 Votes on 179 Posts
What the guy at HD said is true. Sealer has always been part of protecting grout, (often skipped by people who don't know or don't think it's needed) unless you use the type of grout that specifically says it does not need a sealer.
 
  #17  
Old 08-05-18, 08:09 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Washington DC Metro Area
Posts: 57
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Since this job only has to last a few years till I do the full renovation and don't care about the cosmetics too much, it sounds like I don't need to seal the grout I just installed today if sealing only is for mildew/stain prevention and not water sealing. Thanks!
 
  #18  
Old 02-16-19, 08:45 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Washington DC Metro Area
Posts: 57
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Now that this job has been completed, a VERY SPECIAL THANKS is in order to both XSLEEPER and to MARKSR!! I could not have done this job so well without your patience with my novice questions and all of your help! It has been several months now since completion, and I am happy to report that this job came out looking great and is working fantastic. I may not have been able to find tile color to match, but again, this just has to last long enough for me to tackle the complete tear down and renovation of other bathroom. Once that is completed, I will finally do the same to this one. Here are photos of my work:

These cracked tiles leaked water through the ceiling to the floor below causing damage over time.



Removing cracked tiles to repair reviled missing drywall/backer behind tiles so, unfortunately I couldn't just replace with new tile. I had to replace some drywall to give the tile something to properly attach to.



Removed tiles and drywall which was falling apart all the way down to studs. Added 2x4 reinforcement to aid in attaching replacement drywall and add stability.



I cut drywall and holes for pipe stems. Installed using outdoor grade screws.



Here, I've muded the joints



I laid the first row of tile using shims and a level to ensure all tiles would be level. Made level lines with pencil and level for each tile row as a guide.



Cut holes for pipe/valves. Once I passed this step, the rest of the tile job was pretty fast.



All tiles installed. Note spacers used to ensure even space for grout between each tile.



And finally, the job shown complete... both grout and caulk applied, as well as spigot and knobs installed with caulk underneath escutcheons (remember, this is where the problem originated). Walls painted too.



Another happy completion photo complete with sunshine. Seems a shame that I will tear all this out once I complete the other bathroom renovation to begin a complete renovation on this one. But I need a reliable shower in the meantime while I renovate the other bathroom over the next year or so. Thanks again XSLEEPER and to MARKSR for your help and patience!!

 
  #19  
Old 02-17-19, 03:17 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,063
Received 120 Votes on 107 Posts
Looks good! amd now you have a little more experience to help you when you do the next tile job.
I also had a green tub until I redid our bath rm last summer
 
  #20  
Old 02-17-19, 07:45 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Washington DC Metro Area
Posts: 57
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yep. You can't beat avocado green... unless you also have one in salmon pink like I do currently
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: