Concrete Floors treatment

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-27-01, 01:22 PM
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Question

We live in a tidewater house in florida (built on pilings 8 years ago) with a concrete slab for the floor. It was previously tiled with ceramic 12" tiles which are now coming loose and popping up. We intend to remove the old 12" tiles and replace with 16 or 18" tiles. We removed 20 tiles which lifted off very easily with little or no residue left on the concrete floor. It appears that for some reason the tiles did not adhere properly to the concrete. We sprinkled water on the concrete to test for any type of bonding chemical and it was absorbed over several minutes. What would be the best foundation for the tile so that we can be assured it will not pop up due to movement, moisture or previous concrete chemical treatment? We prefer not to use wood since this is a termite area. Nancy
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-27-01, 09:30 PM
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Not sure what the reason would be for your tile coming loose, but we've been having quite a discussion about bonding problems on other tile boards..check out this product at http://www.schluter.com/english/section-6.htm
 
  #3  
Old 05-28-01, 05:16 AM
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Question Ceramic Tile Matting

Thanks. I checked it out and discovered in the company's press release that the product has only been out for 2 1/2 years. I am hesitant to consider something that is not time tested. Any suggestions?
 
  #4  
Old 05-28-01, 09:34 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Katy (Houston area) TX USA
Posts: 1,344
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hi Nancy,

The delamination you have experienced is called "tenting," and there are a number of reasons it can occur, all of which seem to boil down to improper installation. The subfloor may not have been properly cleaned, the wrong adhesive might have been used, etc. Perhaps movement joints should have been provided.

Tell us the dimensions of your intended new installation. It is entirely possible to do a good installation over concrete -- if it's done right and the concrete is in good shape. Also, describe any cracking that might have occured.

John
 
  #5  
Old 05-28-01, 09:53 AM
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Post tile on concrete problems

Dear John, the dimensions of the first area are about 12 1/2'x 40', then shooting off that area is a 9x10 dining area and a kitchen area about 5x 15, then at the end of the 40' area is a hall 4'x13', the last 6' of the hall widen measures 6x6. On the same end of the 40' area on the opposite side where the hall begins, is a front entry that is 5x6. In the area where the actual tenting occurred (and it looked just like a tent), there was a very tiny hairline crack less than a half a millimeter wide. We put a level on the area and it seemed quite level. When you go under the house and inspect the concrete, there is virtually no cracking or sign of movement. When we pulled up the loose tiles there was a papery type membrane stuck on the bottom of the tiles. The concrete floor was astoundingly clean and had very little yellow colored stuff left on the floor. It was all stuck on the tiles.

 
  #6  
Old 05-28-01, 10:54 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Katy (Houston area) TX USA
Posts: 1,344
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hi Nancy,

The yellow stuff may be part of the problem. It sounds like some sort of mastic or glue. Thin set mortar should have been used instead. The papery stuff (I don't know what it might be) doesn't belong there either.

The crack, since it doesn't go through the slab, is merely a "surface check" and wouldn't cause any problem.

A big problem is the lack of movement joints in a 40 foot span. There should have been at least one flexible grout joint and probably two.

Also, I think if you bang around over the entire floor, you'll discover more loose areas -- not necessarily "tented," but hollow sounding. Use the plastic handle of a screwdriver or something similar to tap on the tiles. The hollow areas will be easily apparent.

I hope Adanac or someone else will jump in at this point to give us their perspective. Then we can get down to the new installation (after you get all the old stuff up and out of the way, that is).

John

http://www.johnbridge.com
 
  #7  
Old 05-28-01, 04:37 PM
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Is the yellow the same colour as the background on this web page? If so, then it's probably old oil base glue that they used many years ago. It eventually dries out, leaving no bond at all. I agree with John...40 ft is a long way without an expansion joint. Any chance of sending a picture of the tile and the yellow stuff?
 
  #8  
Old 05-29-01, 04:10 PM
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Smile

I remember something about cardboard in a discussion on another board. I think the consensus was it was an attempt to provide a membrane. Other than that I can't help.
 
  #9  
Old 05-29-01, 05:59 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Katy (Houston area) TX USA
Posts: 1,344
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hey Jim,

Speaking of boards, you've been AWOL from our board for a while.

And speaking of cardboard, I found stips of tile boxes under the tiles in a shower one time. The guy had used them to pack out a ledge. It was a sheetrock shower anyway, but the cardboard added insult to injury.

John
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: