tool to trim tile in place


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Old 03-17-22, 03:25 AM
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tool to trim tile in place


cement board and tile stick out too far across top of niche
I need advice please. I've had to tear out the whole pony wall across the side of my tub because of poor workman ship.. I even had to tear out the left tile of the niche. It took me three hours to tear out the one tile on the left because it was sticking out too far to put 1/2 pencil tile all around the edge. The cement board just shreds when I try to pry it off. And now I see the whole 52" across the top of the niche sticks out 3/8 to 1/2" too far. The bubble sits on the far right with the level running vertically on the front of this pony wall with the level resting on the front of the top tile and bottom tile. What can I use to cut 1/2" off the protruding tiles and cement board so I don't have to tear them out? This has been a total night mare and very costly. Thanks in advance for your time.
 
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03-18-22, 04:59 AM
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I will clarify Marksr's comment a bit. There is no way to waterproof on top of tile. The waterproofing goes on top of the tile backer (underneath the tile).

Do you have a shower in this tub? If not then waterproofing is less critical, though it should still be done because a wet wash cloth, sponge, dripping bottles or splashes can soak through the grout and get between the joints in the cement board/Hardie Backer and through the screw holes. If there is a shower then it definetely needs to be waterproofed. Also check with a level to see if the bottom of the niche has a slight slope towards the tub so it can drain.
 
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Old 03-17-22, 04:57 AM
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Remove the tiles and start the project over. You'll waste a lot of time and money trying to save those few tiles. I don't see any waterproofing under or around the niche so it's go to go anyhow.

If you've just gotta cut them in place and want the specter of leaks into the wall use a diamond blade or carborundum cutoff wheel. It will be noisy and VERY dusty so wear proper protective gear and seal off the room so you don't dust the whole house.
 
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Old 03-17-22, 11:38 AM
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What can I use to cut 1/2" off the protruding tiles and cement board so I don't have to tear them out?
You really cant, that edge will be visible that nothing hand held is going to make a clean edge.

Measure twice, cut once, give it a dry fit to confirm!

I also don't see any kind of waterproofing on that cement board!
 
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Old 03-17-22, 01:07 PM
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this was right before he tiled the pony wall in Feb that I tore out yesterday. Are you saying the wall wasn't prepped and ready to tile? This was hardiebacker cement board. Are you saying it still needs to be waterproofed? Thank you for your time. This is upsetting that we paid them 6,000 we bought all material. This was the fourth screw up and they had a bad attitude at this point. I just wanted them out of my house. They didn't even finish the job because they ran out of tile from so many mistakes. In this photo he was using the wrong tile around the inside of the niche. It was suppose to be the same tile you see facing you. If I need to waterproof the hardieboard, can you suggest what I should by please. thanks
 
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Old 03-17-22, 01:12 PM
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There are 2 ways to waterproof the tile, either from behind [visqueen or tar paper] or on top where you use RedGard or similar. Grout is not waterproof.
 
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Old 03-18-22, 04:59 AM
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I will clarify Marksr's comment a bit. There is no way to waterproof on top of tile. The waterproofing goes on top of the tile backer (underneath the tile).

Do you have a shower in this tub? If not then waterproofing is less critical, though it should still be done because a wet wash cloth, sponge, dripping bottles or splashes can soak through the grout and get between the joints in the cement board/Hardie Backer and through the screw holes. If there is a shower then it definetely needs to be waterproofed. Also check with a level to see if the bottom of the niche has a slight slope towards the tub so it can drain.
 
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Old 03-18-22, 05:21 AM
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guess I did make it sound like the redgard would go on top of the tile
as noted it would go on top of the cement board under the tile
 
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Old 03-18-22, 05:23 AM
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Yes, assumed that was a niche in a shower, if no shower head your ok, I've seen many similar installs where that would all be drywall.
 
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Old 03-18-22, 07:39 AM
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Just another view point. FWIW
Not to go against the prevailing advice or to say it's not correct. But when I did both my bath remodels, I did not use Red Guard. I read reviews and the few that were negative proved to be a nightmare situation. Peeling and poor adhesion. But they were the few. Any rate I checked with several professional drywallers, and shower tub and bath remodelers and they all said Red Guard or similar is a good idea but not mandatory. In fact my home, built in the early seventies did not even use green board, just plane old drywall. In both instances after 35 to 40 years use, and with proper tiling, the drywall was in perfect shape when I did my demo and pulled off the old tile. My whole neighborhood (about 200 houses) were all built by Ryan Homes and all used the same material. I'm not aware of any problems from others about problems concerning tiling or wallboard rotting.
 
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Old 03-18-22, 08:13 AM
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Norm is right. Drywall was used for many years and if the installation is done right will work fine.
 
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Old 03-18-22, 02:40 PM
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Thank you everyone for all your advice. And I did know how the waterproof worked, unlike a tile sealer that goes on top of the tile. So glad I don't have to have the waterproof. This has been very costly considering I had to order another case of tile and tear out all his work other than the actual pony wall. There were so many mistakes made and once I made him correct the first mistake his bad attitude affected everything after that point. There is nothing I hate more than telling a worker it must be redone. I have laid lots of tile over the years but nothing like this heavy tile I chose for this job. This was going to be my last remodel. I knew I couldn't put in a curbless shower myself. I don't even know yet if the linear drain will have to be torn out. It holds water on the left side of a 52" drain,. About 3/4" at the farthest point. My husband said unless we end up harvesting mosquitos in the standing water we are leaving it. I am just sick about it. Does anyone here have a fix that doesn't include a complete tear out? I will add pics if someone wants to see my nightmare. Thanks again for your time!
 
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Old 03-18-22, 02:43 PM
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It holds water
​​​​​​​Use a squeegee after every use.
 
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Old 03-18-22, 07:38 PM
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trough drain holds water


this is the trough drain that holds water. I added dye to show the water better. I have never seen a 1" squeegee. We'd have to remove the tile insert to get to it.

this is where the linear drain is installed that is holding water.
 
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Old 03-18-22, 07:49 PM
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Fill it with a self leveling sealant. Loctite S20 comes to mind if you don't mind the color. Other sealants you can find are clear, like Geocel 2310 but you need to apply it in thin coats letting each cure before adding more. Or a self levelling concrete, it would be dry in about 2 hrs.

You'd have to grind the sides of the grill to match the new slope.
 
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Old 03-21-22, 11:06 AM
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So I have replaced all the hardy board and I am ready to tile the pony wall. I want to rent a tile cutter so I can put the tiles on the diagonal since it is 18" I have the pattern drawn out. It is a small area with not a lot of cuts. I thought it might not be too hard since it is a small area. It is raining today but thought I'd go to Home Depot and rent a wet tile cutter Wed. that will cut on the diagonal. With the right tile cutter, is cutting on the diagonal hard to do? Thanks in advance for your time!
 
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Old 03-21-22, 11:19 AM
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Hard no, accurate a bit difficult.

No different than cutting a board. Straight cuts use the fence to guide the tile, but diagonal your sort of eye balling it unless you nave something like a carpenters speed square.

For DIY personally I would try to avoid but the only saving grace is the cut edges should all be into the corners and not seen.
 
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Old 03-21-22, 12:13 PM
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cutting tile on the diagonal

Are you saying if I rent a tile cutter it won't have a fence to help guide the tile through at an angle? I just put a new blade on my tile cutter but it is not one like a pro would use. . I assumed a more expensive cutter would have a guide to help keep it straight. When I looked at wet tile cutters thinking I might buy one that cuts on the diagonal ,I think they started at 250 and went up. I am towards the end of my remodeling days. I have tiled every back splash and bathroom myself except this for this curbless shower tub area. I don't need to own an expensive tile cutter. There is no way I am cutting expensive tile eyeballing it for 18" I have drawn it up and it should take 7 tiles and a few slivers for the bottom under the niche. The floors are cut on the diagonal and I think it wouldn't look right if the tiles were not on the diagonal. I posted pics showing the linear drain and you can see the floor. Here's a link to the tile I am using-Merola Tile Saja Blanco 13 in. x 13 in. Ceramic Floor and Wall Tile (12.2 sq. ft. / case) FPESAJB (homedepot.com)

this was our fireplace last year before I refaced it with stone and built the pilasters from oak I had left over from an old Victorian home I renovated years ago.

this is the new look. I am capable and not afraid to take on small projects like this and the niche in our bathroom. Anything bigger than this is a bit much for me. I think most things can be done when using the proper tools. I would like to do the niche on the diagonal if it is something a homeowner can do. Thank you for your time.
 
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Old 03-21-22, 12:33 PM
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Grat work. You're master. But for sevn or eight pieces, I think eyeballing it should work fine. Especially since the cuts will be in the corner and grouted.
 
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Old 03-21-22, 04:30 PM
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Are you saying if I rent a tile cutter it won't have a fence
We have no idea what a rental store near you provides, usually they have fences but to cut angles it requires a second piece that holds the tile at the angle that slides along the fence.

You need to see what they have!
 
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Old 03-21-22, 06:47 PM
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If they don't have a diagonal fence adapter on the saw sled, buy a 10" plastic speed square for $5. (Shaped like a right triangle) You can likely use it on the sled to guide the tile through at a 45. Might need a couple c clamps to hold the speed square down to keep both hands free.
 
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Old 03-22-22, 04:46 AM
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Long ago I did a LOT of tile work with a really cheap diamond wet saw. I bought it try because it was less than the cost of two days rental and it works really well and I still use it sometimes 20 years later. It's very easy to mark your diagonal line on the tile with a permenant marker. If your saw has a parallel edge you can also use a framing square as a guide to hold your tile at a 45į angle.

 
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Old 03-22-22, 12:51 PM
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angle cuts

My tile cutter I have used for years is about like that. My whole problem is my fence only comes out parallel to the blade about 6" I think. My tiles are 18" on the diagonal so the fence must be greater than 9" to hold a square up against the fence.. My most important cuts are the ones that butt up to the top of the niche. The silver glass pencil tile outlining the niche will draw the eye right to it. In my opinion crooked tiles above that line will stick out like a sore thumb. It can't be anything less than perfect if I will have to look at it. I don't care how many cuts or time it takes. I want to get this right the first time. So once I get the proper tile cutter for the job, I will tack a board up to hold the top row of tiles in place to dry. Once dry, I can do the rest. Does that sound like the best way. Or should I start at the bottom and work my way up? I'm not sure why I think I should start at the top. Please let me know what you think. I do value your opinions. Thank you so much! This has been very helpful.

Anyway, I will post a pic when I am done grouting. I am ready to get this over with so I can start of refinishing all my bathroom cabinets. I am going to ceruse them. I have 21 doors and 5 drawers and all the stiles of course. It will be much easier than all this tiling. Have a blessed week.
 

Last edited by XSleeper; 03-22-22 at 04:39 PM. Reason: Removed off topic comments
 

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