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Huge uneven tile to hardwood floor difference. Looking for best transition?

Huge uneven tile to hardwood floor difference. Looking for best transition?


  #1  
Old 03-02-23, 06:07 AM
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Huge uneven tile to hardwood floor difference. Looking for best transition?

My bathroom floor stands about a inch from my bedroom hardwood floor. I figured after putting tile down it will stand as high as a 1 1/2. I am trying get some thoughts on transitioning? I found a floor transition that's like a ramp that I think might be a good solution. Here it is: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...MPBKMVD4O&th=1


 
  #2  
Old 03-02-23, 06:22 AM
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A couple things. 1/4" board is what's usually used on floors. 1/2" is typically for walls. Secondly, your tile should end at the midpoint of your closed door. So your tile is protruding through the doorway about 3" too far. And when your tile is back far enough, (under the closed door) it's pretty easy to transition to a wood floor with a sloped wood transition that is stained and finished to match your floor.

So assuming the door swings into the bathroom, I'd suggest you cut that cement board back until it's only sticking into the threshold area about 1/4". Once drywall is on, that will be 3/4".

and no, I wouldn't use a metal threshold as a transition.
 
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Old 03-02-23, 08:09 AM
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I am also concerned why your bathroom subflooring is very proud of the floor outside. If looks like you've put your new subflooring on top of the old, making it very thick. How many layers are there in the bathroom floor? I would consider stripping it down to the joists and build it back up to minimize the thickness difference with the hardwood outside.
 
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Old 03-02-23, 08:27 AM
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It has 3/4" wood planks on top of joists and 3/4" Advantech osb. The floor was not leveled. I placed shims under the osb to level that might count for the extra thickness.
 
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Old 03-02-23, 10:06 AM
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Like already mentioned, 1/4 inch cement board is for floors.
 
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Old 03-02-23, 10:10 AM
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3/4" Advantech can be used for joist spacing up to 24" and it's rock solid with 16" joist spacing. You can remove the old layer of the subflooring. That with 1/4" cement board or Hardie Backer and you've gotten rid of most of the height problem.

It looks like you screwed down the Advantech so it could be taken up. Remove the old subflooring. Then screw your already cut Advantech back down. You can do any shimming you need between the joists and Advantech.
 
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Old 03-02-23, 10:25 AM
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Only problem with what Pilot Dane suggests, is that all your interior bathroom walls are sitting on top of the 3/4" shiplap subfloor. So if you do that you'll need a toe kick saw to cut along the walls and then you'll have to install quite a bit of blocking to support the walls and subfloor. And depending on the joist layout that can be tough. Sometimes you just need to leave some old subfloor by cutting it down the middle of a joist that is parallel to (and closest to) a wall. Level the new subfloor then float the old subfloor to meet the new.
 
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Old 03-02-23, 10:47 AM
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At this point I have already connected the shower drain and mortar down the base. If I can make it work as is I will know what to do next go around. I can at least if need be is to change the cement boards. Who ever installed the old bathroom did the same thing osb over the plank.
 
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Old 03-02-23, 11:51 AM
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The Advantech is a great choice for a bathroom. It is extremely moisture/water resistant and super stiff and strong. A great subflooring for tile.

Before laying your tile I would work out how you want to do the transition first. That way you can decide exactly where you want your tile to end. This could allow the option of having the transition strip underneath the door and not sticking out into the room.

If you can't find a stock transition strip of the shape and size you need they are easy to make. You can but a strip of wood. Most home centers have a section of premium "nice" woods. If you don't have the tools for shaping it ask around for woodworkers in your area. Many are dying for projects to work on and might love helping you out.
 
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Old 03-02-23, 12:23 PM
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I have a few ideals. 1- since Advantech is a great choice for a bathroom what if I lay the tile over the osb instead of the cement board? although it's not recommended I have heard it's been done successfully?
2- laydown 1/8 Ditra and then tile? 3- Instead of using tile install either
Luxury vinyl flooring or laminate flooring ( I don't know which one would work better in a bathroom) I have a few pieces of tile and LVT I laid it on the on the floor and the height is not looking to bad. I will hold off on working until I hear back some response's and make a decision.
 
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Old 03-02-23, 02:32 PM
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You could use Ditra over thinset (one that meets ANSI A118.11) if you want ceramic tile.

You could omit the cement board if you go with LVT. Just be sure you use a waterproof LVT. And it can be a little tricky to lock if you haven't worked with it much.
 
 

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