Can I have the walk in shower curbless?


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Old 04-23-24, 03:51 PM
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Question Can I have the walk in shower curbless?

Hi everyone. I am looking into converting my bathtub bathroom into a walking shower. I have some ques regarding the drainage slope. I plan on using the kerdi or wedi shower pan.

My question is do I need to have a 2 inch slope around the entire drain?

I know I will have the 2 inch slope going from wall B to wall D. But I won't have that slope going from wall A to wall C (next to the sink). Do I need to build a wall there? I was thinking of just having a glass between the shower and the sink.

 

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04-25-24, 08:56 AM
Pilot Dane
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"If you look at the photo I posted there is a small circle..."
Yes, you have stated that several times.

"...the 2" slope will start at the linen closet (by wall D) going downward to wall B..."
A shower pan is not a simple slope. It is almost a compound curve or at least multi faced. It is not a single sloping plane. All the sides of the shower are higher and the slope is downward towards the drain. Sort of like a very flat funnel. Your 2" high at the closet also means the shower pan is 2" high on the other side of the corner where you show your shower entrance. So, it will not be curbless. There will be the full height of the pan around the perimeter. In order to get it curbless it must be recessed down into the floor. This is usually done by structurally modifying the floor joists to allow for the cutout.

The diagram below shows you how a pan is shaped and sloped.


The image below is not the pan you will use but at least you can see how it's sloped. You can see that it is high all around the perimeter and slopes down to the drain. So, with your plan you will still have the 2" high edge across the opening where you want it curbless.

 
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Old 04-23-24, 04:21 PM
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Depends - are you comfortable with shower use putting water on the floor by the sink?

How are you accounting for any slope without a curb?
 
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Old 04-24-24, 06:26 AM
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You say 2" slope but don't say from where.

In a wet room or shower the floor should slope towards the drain. The slope needs to be in all directions.

As a retrofit I think this will be a difficult job. The only way to have a curbless shower is to slope downhill. If the entrance to the shower is flush with the bathroom floor then the only elevation you have to work with is going down. During new construction the floor joists can be done to allow for the shower to be recessed into the floor. That isn't possible as a retrofit unless other structural work is done to the floor.
 
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Old 04-24-24, 10:29 AM
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I have a similar project underway now. The contractor has sistered the joists and is installing the top of the subfloor flush with the top of the joists in the shower area. There will be a slight curb at the entrance (about 2 inches) but I think the shower floor will have less than a 2 inch slope to the center drain. The threshold will be about 3/4 inch above the outside tile floor with hot water underfloor radiant heating on top of subfloor installed on top of joists.
 
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Old 04-25-24, 05:59 AM
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stickshift i would prefer not to have water under the sink floor, but I can prepare for it waterproofing the entire bathroom wall and floor.

I am accounting for the slope by installing a shower pan. I seen some that on one end is 2" tall and then it slope towards the drainage at the other end, this type of shower pan will fit perfectly where my current bathtub is at

If you look at the picture I posted the bathtub have a small circle next to wall B, that's supposed to be the drainage, so going from wall B to the linen closet (wall D) I will have the 2" slope. The 2" being next to the linen closet sloping downward to the drainage by wall B.

Now from that drainage going towards the sink I feel I will need to elevate the sub floor to make sure the drainage is 2" deep therefore a curb or a wall is needed there.
 
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Old 04-25-24, 06:56 AM
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How are you going to make your shower curbless if the pan is 2" thick at the edge? The pan will have significant thickness on the side so you will still have a "curb" or step up into the shower. The thickness of the shower pan isn't only on that one edge. The entire pan is thicker at the edges and slope down in the middle towards the drain.

Remember all of the shower floor must slope to the drain. This results in a compound curve with the drain as the lowest point. The shower floor is not a flat plane with one edge higher.
 
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Old 04-25-24, 07:37 AM
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Pilot Dane 2john02458

If you look at the photo I posted there is a small circle in the bathtub by wall B that is the drainage and I plan on keeping it there. So the 2" slope will start at the linen closet (by wall D) going downward to wall B. I know in that direction I will have the 2" slope. My concern is from the drainage to the sink alongside wall B.

I plan on removing the sub floor under the bathtub (current sub floor has water damage) and I will be placing my shower pan on the reinforced joist.

My research indicated that there is a high probability that my bathroom sub floor is 3/4" thick, so lowering my sub floor at the shower will gaine me that 3/4" plus about 1/5" between the thinset and the floor membrane. I still be 1" shy. I could elevate my entire bathroom floor 1" but currently my bathroom floor is flush with the outside floor. I feel 1 will be very noticeable
 
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Old 04-25-24, 08:56 AM
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"If you look at the photo I posted there is a small circle..."
Yes, you have stated that several times.

"...the 2" slope will start at the linen closet (by wall D) going downward to wall B..."
A shower pan is not a simple slope. It is almost a compound curve or at least multi faced. It is not a single sloping plane. All the sides of the shower are higher and the slope is downward towards the drain. Sort of like a very flat funnel. Your 2" high at the closet also means the shower pan is 2" high on the other side of the corner where you show your shower entrance. So, it will not be curbless. There will be the full height of the pan around the perimeter. In order to get it curbless it must be recessed down into the floor. This is usually done by structurally modifying the floor joists to allow for the cutout.

The diagram below shows you how a pan is shaped and sloped.


The image below is not the pan you will use but at least you can see how it's sloped. You can see that it is high all around the perimeter and slopes down to the drain. So, with your plan you will still have the 2" high edge across the opening where you want it curbless.

 
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Old 04-26-24, 08:48 AM
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Pilot Dane thanks a lot for your help.

Video#1: Linear Shower Panhttps://youtu.be/8jhNfPj2UKI?si=L6Ldd8OuTGdV8cbm Video#2: Multi Face Shower Panhttps://youtu.be/TNfpGw3iEdU?si=LxLaOT1xuFSofZlN I had the idea of doing something similar to video#1. I read somewhere that for curbless showers the slope needed to be 1/4" to 1/2" per foot until you reach the height of 2" incase the system back up. And this was starting from the shower entrance to the drain which will give you a 4ft distance if you do it at 1/2" per foot. Both of these videos have the drain at the entrance so they don't have that 4ft distance from the drain to the shower entrance. If the slope on the multi-face shower pan has the 2" slope in all directions will that work? Instead of having a curb at the shower entrance I will be having an incline slope) also extra work is needed to level it with the rest of the bathroom floor?
 
 

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