Wallpapering a bathroom


  #1  
Old 08-26-02, 10:30 PM
Linda E
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Wallpapering a bathroom

I have finished the tedious task of removing the old vinyl wallpaper, the backing, and the lining paper and have primed the walls. So I think I'm finally ready to hang paper but I don't know where to hang the first strip! The bathroom does not have a single un-broken wall. There are 5 doorways (for closets, shower stall, and toilet closet) to deal with. The most inconspicous spot would be the corner behind the entry door. Do I start there?

I am hanging vinyl wallpaper. For inside corners, should I wrap the paper around the corner, or do I trim it so that two pieces meet at the corner?

And finally - how the heck do I get paper behind the toilet?! And along the top and sides of a huge (7' x 6') mirror. There's about 2" of wall on three sides of that mirror. I'm doing this job alone so taking the mirror down is not an option.

Thanks so much for your help!

Linda
 
  #2  
Old 08-27-02, 09:30 AM
W
Member
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
Posts: 618
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Where to start: You will start where you want to end. This junction is known as the kill point. This will be were there will be a pattern miss-match and it should be in the least obvious spot for you. This should be the only portion of your job that will require vertical trimming, other than to avoid an obstacle like a doorway. Pick a spot that is suitable and make pencil marks that will indicate where all your seams will fall. You should re-adjust your positioning so that the kill point ensures that each seam falls where you want. You do not want a seam within 4 inches or so of any corner. You do not want a seam really close to a doorway, forcing you to cut a 1/4" strip the length of your doorway. Generally you want to view the tic marks with later installation in mind and adjust your kill point as needed.

Inside Corners: I will give you my advice, but there are 83,000 different methods for doing this. Pull your strip into the corner using a plastic wallpaper smoother. Ensure you get a tight fit from the top to the very bottom. This is the time you want to be especially fastidious and anal retentive. Then smooth the remainder onto the opposing wall. Then smooth that side into the corner from top to bottom. Obviously, you do not want any air pockets, bunching, or gaps between the wall and the paper. Then you cut a vertical line at a 45 degree angle to the adjacent walls. This is called the relief cut. It will stop the wallpaper from bunching up or creating those lovely air pockets in your corners. A cool tool (I haven't used one) that makes this simple is the Papercut. On this webpage, there is a video that shows the tool in action and demonstrates, using the tool, the method I described. You may want to pick one up if you think it will help.

For the toilet and mirror, you will want to do a "duck and cover". This is my crazy term for how to do it. Once the strip is up and overlapping the mirror like crazy, you cut the wallpaper about 2" from all edges of the mirror. I hope you can undo the brackets slightly to at least get 1/8" of play between it and the wall. Then you make a 3" or so relief cut, where need be, but generally at a 45 degree angle in the corner, and smooth the material behind the mirror. If you have less play, cut shorter than 2". If you have ZERO play, treat like a door frame and cut it totally flush. You will use the same method with the toilet. Use your smoother to push the extra behind the tank and you can even use the back of your blade for really tight areas.

Above all else. Buy a quality Olfa knife with snappable blades. Buy the Olfa Blades for it too. A bargain basement knife will tear, not cut, your wallpaper. Follow my rule: Every cut, break off a new blade.

I hope I have given you the help you need. Many times paperhanging lends itself more to showing than telling and it is really hard to describe all the variables. If you need additional clarification, please write back and I will do my best. Otherwise, you may consider hiring a pro or for less than $25 you can get this video or check your local home improvement stores and see if they have any you can buy/rent. Best of luck!
 
  #3  
Old 08-27-02, 09:10 PM
Linda E
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thank you!

Rebecca,

Thank you very much for the thorough explanations and suggestions. I managed to get the wall behind the toilet, but haven't tackled the mirror yet. The bathroom is 3/4 done and I decided several hours ago that "you get what you pay for". I am definitely not a threat to the professionals out there. I papered my kitchen a couple of weeks ago and that was much easier BUT I didn't plan ahead and got to the edge of the wall needing 1/2" strip.


Linda
 
  #4  
Old 08-28-02, 08:00 AM
W
Member
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
Posts: 618
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Linda,

Very funny reply post! "not a threat to the professionals".....too funny. Glad to see I shouldn't fear you. Planning is one of the biggest keys to wallpaper. Many know about the kill point and plan for it, but in the end, have the dreaded 1/2" strip like you described. Planning + kill point planning hopefully ensures you will have an easier time. That didn't stop me from cutting two pieces in a row short yesterday though!!
 
  #5  
Old 08-28-02, 09:45 PM
Linda E
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
I did it!

Well Rebecca, thanks to your expert advice, the bathroom wallpapering is finished. It only took me about 18 hours to do what would probably have taken you 3 or 4 hours, including travel time. But the wallpaper gods were with me, and when I got to the left side of the big mirror, the strip of paper I was hanging was wide enough to wrap around that corner, so I did. I'd rather risk potential corner sags than piece in a 2" strip. I was afraid to loosen the mirror even a bit, so I trimmed the paper close to it. That mirror has so much wallpaper paste on the edges it won't fall (like it almost did last week when the top clips pulled out of the wall). I ended with a bit of leftover paste, and 2 double rolls of paper that I can return for credit.

I'm soooo glad to have this chore out of the way - and since it wasn't as awful as I expected, just slow - that I'm already thinking of re-doing the guest bathroom. Which has a smaller mirror and fewer doors to work around. I would just like to wring the necks of the former owners who hung non-strippable paper. What a cruel trick to play on future owners!

Thanks again!
Linda
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: