Wallpaper over plywood


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Old 04-27-04, 12:52 PM
J
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Wallpaper over plywood

I am installing plywood on one wall of a powder room in
order to support some new fixtures and have plenty of
support for future planned fixtures. The interior of this
wall is filled with pipes, etc. hence is near impossible to
add good blocking for fixture support.

My question is; once the plywood is in place can I wallpaper
over the plywood with the same wallpaper (or any wallpaper)
that I will be using on the other walls, which are dry wall?
What type of plywood should I use, and what preparation steps
should occur before hanging any paper? What future problems
might I expect?

Thanks,
Jim
 
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Old 04-27-04, 03:35 PM
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After the plywood is hung and in place, prime it with a high quality white pigmented acrylic primer. Zinsser 123 would be good. Then install liner paper over that. Then you can hang regular wallpaper over that.

The best place to get liner paper is Cavalier Wall Liner
 
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Old 06-25-04, 08:00 AM
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Paper over plywood: installing liner

My fiancee picked up liner paper at Lowes. Its not
prepasted so she also got paste. We have the walls
primed with 123 Zinser and are ready to go. (One wall
is plywood, the other 3 are sheetrock, we primed all.)

I have found lots of articles on hanging wall paper, and
have done several rooms myself. But I've never put up
liner and I can't find any articles on hanging the liner.
Can anyone point me to, or provide me with how you
hang liner paper?

Thanks,
Jim
I found this web page Sunday,
http://www.mygreathome.com/fix-it_gu...ring_walls.htm
with infortamtion on hanging liner. A little brief but probably
has the essentials. One surprise was that they recommend
priming the liner after its up, and warn that if you don't the
decorative wall paper you put over it will not stick.
Is this correct?
 

Last edited by JTeller; 06-27-04 at 10:53 AM. Reason: New info, no replies yet
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Old 06-28-04, 10:20 AM
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are there any instructions on the liner label??? i'd do whatever they say. and i think you need really thick, heavy duty paste to get wall liner (which is practically like felt and is never pre-pasted) to stick. did she buy the right kind?
 
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Old 06-28-04, 12:16 PM
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Wallpaper over plywood: paste for liner

The liner is made by Imperial Home Decor Group and is called
"CoverUps". I opened a roll and there were instruction on the
back of the label. They do indicate that after drying the liner
should be "primed" before hanging decorative wallpaper. The
instructions differ from those I found at the web site mentioned
in an early post, in that the instructions with the liner just say
to hang vertically (rather than horizontal) and to wait 48 hours
(rather than 36) before hanging the decorative wallpaper.

The store sold my fiancee a quart of Golden Harvest brand
"universal Border Paste". (The are we are doing is small,
a 6ft x 3ft powder room with wainscot covering the lower
32 inches of the wall.

Is this paste ok to use with the liner? What product should
I use to "prime" the liner? (The walls are currently primed with
1-2-3 Zinser product, but I've used that whole quart for this
and other projects). Does "prime" mean the same thing as "size"?

Thanks,
Jim
 
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Old 06-28-04, 12:34 PM
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the border paste should be fine (it's probably the thick vinyl-over-vinyl stuff) and the Zinsser 123 should work, too. if you're going to hang the liner vertically, just be sure that when you hang your wallpaper, the wallpaper seams don't land directly on top of the liner seams (ie stagger them). otherwise, hanging the liner vertically should be just fine.

i'd say you're good to go!!!

good luck!

(feel free to post back & say how everything went!)
 
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Old 06-30-04, 07:08 PM
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I wouldn't prime the liner, (I never do). You didn't have to prime the back of the liner to make it stick to the wall right?

Don't use 'universal border adhesive'. Buy a gallon or two of Heavy Duty Clear premix adhesive. HD probably carries Romans 880, or 838, or my fav is Dynamite 234.

Hang the liner with the premix, and let dry 24 or 48 hours. If the seams butt up good, you can hang right over that. If they don't, you might need to doublecut them on the wall. And its possible you might need to skim float the seams on the liner depending on the type of paper to hung on it.

Then hang the paper with the premix too.

Sorry, I have been real busy at work and missed this thread. If you need more detailed info on hanging the liner, let me know.
 
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Old 07-01-04, 08:58 PM
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Wallpaper over plywood: the liner has been hung

Well, the deed was done before getting Prowallguy's last post.
That is we pasted it with the border paste. Probably laid on a
bit too much paste at that, but once dried the result looked fine.

We choose to go with the horizontal technique. On the first wall
I followed the guide I found online and put the first strip at the top,
the next at the bottom and the last butted the seamsto the bottom
strip, overlapped the top and cut through both to form that seam.

I found I'm not very good at cutting through 2 layers to make a seam
(though I did snap off the old blade every few cuts). I quickly realized
that since I am installing molding (this is a complete powder room redo)
after the paper is up, that I could just but all the seams and precut the
last strip so its edge will be under the new molding. So other than the
first wall I eneded up with pretty good seams.

I also had some problems trimming the strips into the corners. On two or
three I would get a little tear at some point rather than a clean cut. This
was a bit agonizing as I had a lot of obstacles such as a built in shelf,
two wall scounces (or at least the electrical box for them), a double switch
plate, a window (right over the water closet), and door casing (which happened to have two square rosettes to cut around).

Given Prowallguy's advice to possibly "skim" coat bad seams, can I do
something similar to touch up the little tears? I have premixed joint
compound as well as spakling paste, which would be better to use?
My one bad seam feels a bit raised. What should I do to smooth that out?
I like the idea of not having to prime the liner as that will save a day
(waiting for the primer to dry). BTW: the decorative paper is just and
average prepasted vinyl, no real definitive pattern (though there is a
repeat), of average weight and no mylar (years ago I did a dining room with
a paper that had a mylar like silver finish with the design printed on top
of that, tough to hang).

Lastly, for us naive amateurs, what is the difference between "sizing" and
"priming" a wall in preparation for hanging paper? Are these interchangeable
terms or are there specific conditions when you do one or the other (or both)?

PS: One lesson I learned with the nliner that might help someone else;
I had predrilled holes for installing accessories (towel rods, paper holder,
mirror hangers, etc.) and found that once the liner is up and dry,
it does its job well and hides those holes too. The lesson is that if you
need to know where something is after the liner is up, take good
measurements or mark the spots while hanging the strip that covers
those locations.

Thanks,\
Jim Teller
 
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Old 07-02-04, 05:56 AM
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Pushed for time right now but will say most people think 'sizing' and 'priming' are the same, but they are not. Sizing is using a thinned out version of paste, applying it to the wall to aid adhesion. Priming is using a pre-wallcovering primer, usually acrylic, also to aid adhesion and facilitate removal at a later time.
 
  #10  
Old 07-02-04, 03:33 PM
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wallpaper over playwood: liner seams and tears

Thanks for the quick reply. When you have some time could
you elaborate on "skim coating" seams? What material to use
(joint compound or spackling)? How to deal with a poor cut that
has left a raised seam? And what to do with small tears at cuts.

Thanks,
Jim

PS: Hope everyone has a good July 4th holiday. I'm off to
see "Red, White and Boom" fireworks display in downtown
Columbus.
 
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Old 07-02-04, 07:23 PM
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For a raised seam: Use a razor blade held flat against the liner, and try to shave off the raised lip. Or use 80grit sand paper to knock it down.

To Skim coat a seam: Use a 4" or 6" stiff putty knife, and apply joint compound along the seam. Spread it on about 1/4" like cake frosting, making sure to force it down into the seam. Then come along right behind it with a 10" or 12" stiff mudding knife and scrape it all back off. Wax on, wax off. This will leave the joint compound in the low spots. Sometimes you might need to leave it on a little thicker to cover up worse blemishes. This is called 'floating'. Try to fade it smooth on the edges so it makes it easier to sand. If floated right, you might not need to sand at all.

For cuts and tears: If they don't leave bigs gaps, or are very noticeable, then dont do anything. When you hang the paper, they will be covered. If they are noticeable, float them out with spackle if small, or j. c. if large. If in a corner, run a bead of latex caulk down the corner, smoothing it in with your finger.

Hope that helps.
 
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Old 07-02-04, 09:30 PM
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Wallpaper over plywood

Thanks for the details. I think this is very helpful.

Jim
 
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Old 07-10-04, 11:02 AM
lenefor
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Question wallpaper over old plywood

We have a 1988 motorhome with layers of peeling wallpaper. I have been stripping it and found plywood underneath. Much of the plywood around the windows is water damaged.

I think I can follow the suggestions given here, i.e. prime, use liner, but wonder if I should do anything else to the water-damaged areas.

Also, there are a number of irregular seams in the plywood, like it was pieced. There was some type of tape over many of these joints but they came off with the wallpaper. Should I use seam tape. Is the fiberglass type used on wallboard okay?

Thanks for any suggestions
 
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Old 07-10-04, 04:15 PM
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Use an oil-based primer for the water stains.
And yes, you can use the fiberglass tape to mud the seams of the plywood.
 
 

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