wallpaper over paneling


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Old 02-04-06, 10:32 AM
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Question wallpaper over paneling

Iwould like to put textured paintable wallpaper over the paneling in my hallway and kitchen. Would I have to put wallpaper liner over the paneling first to bridge the grooves, or will the textured wallpaper take care of bridging the grooves on its own? My goal is not to have any grooves showing through after I paint.
 
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Old 02-04-06, 01:09 PM
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Install the liner first.
 
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Old 02-06-06, 10:40 AM
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PWG: could she skim coat the grooves first instead? if so, that might be easier than hanging liner.

or.........if the paper she's using is the kind that's a thin spongy material and flat on the back (as opposed to the anaglypta kind that's the reverse texture on the back), would that hide the grooves?

just wondering for my own info........
 
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Old 02-06-06, 03:00 PM
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No, skim coating is a hassle, and requires 2 coats as mud generally shrinks as it dries.
And the average prepaste texture paper will not span the grooves sufficiently.
Liner paper solves it all in one step. Plus it provides a much better surface to hang on.
Liner for this application is usually hung by 'crosslining' or 'railroading', meaning you install the liner horizontally, not vertically.
 
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Old 02-06-06, 08:17 PM
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Wallpapering over paneling

I am working on this same thing in some of my rooms, right now my bedroom. This house was built in 1969 and they loved fake wood paneling back then. Most of ours is the good kind with the deeper grooves. I put down two coats of joint compound in my grooves but even so, after papering and it then drying, the paper sunk into the darn grooves, forcing me to do a quick wallpaper removal. Thank God it was just one wall. I am also wanting to do wallpaper in my family room, as we just prefer the paper and hate the grooves left showing after painting over.

You say that you should hang this wallpaper liner crossways instead of vertically? How does that guarrantee that the grooves still won't show afterward? I don't want to waste my time and money unless I know 100% this will work. I read another article where a guy said they had used the liner and it still let the grooves show through. As hubby and I had decided to start lining the family room also, we really need to know. The walls in this family room are more than one panel high and it was covered with moulding where it joins. As for our bedroom, sigh, no drywall under the paneling means I do not have much choice as to what can be done unless I want to remove all the wall and replace it with drywall. How hard is that? It doesn't sound hard.

Shoddy workmanship I noticed was in the moulding in most of the rooms. Where they joined the moulding, especially in the corners, is highly noticeable as it does not join properly even though mitered, and where they joined it along the length of the wall was poorly done.
 
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Old 02-07-06, 10:42 AM
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When liner is installed, it is important to make sure to sweep the material in place in the same directions of the groove. If you go across the grooves, it can push it into it, leaving another groove. Sweep with the grooves, and use a liner suited to your particular application. For deep grooves, we use Cavalier's Heavy-Duty Non-Woven Liner.
 
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Old 02-07-06, 07:15 PM
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You can put 1/4 inch drywall over the existing paneling. The only problems will be outlets and wall switches. For those, you can buy box extensions to bring the boxes even with the drywall.

It'd would be worth it to have a pro come in to at least mud the joints, if not install the drywall.
 
 

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