corners and pattern matching


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Old 04-03-06, 10:53 AM
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corners and pattern matching

I did some searching through this forum and couldn't find quite what I was looking for, so I thought I would post a question.

I'm going to be hanging some wallpaper in my dining room soon. I've never done this before. I have been doing some reading on it and am not too worried about the mechanics of hanging the paper. But I am not sure about what to do when I reach the corners - all inside corners BTW.

A booklet I got from a local wallpaper store says to pick a corner of the room to be the last corner, where the pattern mismatch will be. I have a corner next to a china cabinet in mind that will somewhat hide it. They say that when coming to the last piece on a wall, to trim the piece so that only a half inch overlaps onto the next wall. Then start the first piece of the adjacent blank wall in the corner, lining up with a plumb line of course.

It seems to me that by doing this I will have a pattern mismatch at every corner. Is it adviseable to trim the first piece of the blank wall vertically so that the pattern lines up as it comes around the corner, or is that a no-no?

The pattern is a series of vertical stripes of differing colors. This is vinyl paper, going on drywall. I have put a coat of a Killz type primer I got at the wallpaper store over the only coat of paint on the walls.

Unless I'm missing something unstated in the booklet I have, each of my four corners will be unmatched corners. Any comments or suggestions appreciated.
 
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Old 04-03-06, 12:28 PM
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when you come to your first corner (the last strip for that wall), you will trim off the side so that the strip only wraps into the corner by 1/2" (but don't throw away the excess that you just cut off!). then you start the next wall using the piece that you trimmed off, not a full new strip. so your pattern match will only be off by a smidge, which won't be that noticeable. it's when you've made it all the way around the room & you're hanging your VERY last strip up to the corner where you began that the match will be the worst.

does that make sense?

also, just in case you don't know this, if you're planning to use the adhesive that's on the back (if it's pre-pasted), you'll still need to use a vinyl-over-vinyl adhesive on the corner overlap areas. otherwise, where you overlap the strips, the top paper won't stick to the paper underneath. just get a cheap, disposable 1" brush & paint the adhesive onto the 1/2" edge of the wrapped strip before you hang that next first strip for each wall. and change your blade OFTEN. you want to slice/cut through the paper when trimming - not rip/tear it. at the first hint it's not razor sharp anymore, change it.

good luck!
 
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Old 04-03-06, 12:57 PM
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Aaahhh...that makes perfect sense! I'm hoping because it's stripes it's not too noticeable. I hadn't read anywhere about the vinyl-to-vinyl adhesive for the overlaps. That makes sense too.

Thanks for the help!
 
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Old 04-03-06, 01:11 PM
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are you hanging floor to ceiling strips? 8-foot tall? if so, just know that in a double roll of wallpaper, you've got just enough for four 8-foot strips, so don't cut them too long or you'll only get 3 strips and a bunch of unusable waste. only allow 3" per strip extra for trimming (1.5" top and 1.5" bottom) and use a straight edge to cut straight across.

as a first-time hanger, i was overzealous in allowing extra for trimming & couldn't figure out why i had so much waste!!! learn from my mistake!
 
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Old 04-03-06, 06:45 PM
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Waste? Try a pattern with a repeat greater than 20".
Those s/b against the law!
 
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Old 04-04-06, 05:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Annette
are you hanging floor to ceiling strips?
Actually it's from the chair rail up to crown molding. When I figured it, I took off only a third of the window and door footage. I'm probably cutting it close with four double rolls, but with my luck if I'd have gotten another roll I probably would only use a strip or two. We decided to go with four, and we'll leave the last piece of the wall behind the china cabinet so if we're short we'll just pony up for another roll and it will be hidden in case it doesn't match exactly. We'll see if being cheap will pay off for me. ; )
 
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Old 04-04-06, 09:34 AM
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you really need to buy enough to have some extra leftover for possible future repairs.
 
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Old 04-04-06, 09:42 AM
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Yeah, I know. Did you miss the part where I said I was cheap? : )

Seriously though, I considered getting more, but if I never touched that roll (a double roll, which I think is silly and just a way for the wallpaper companies to sell more wallpaper) it would have been $50 wasted. We'll see how it turns out.
 
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Old 04-04-06, 12:37 PM
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well, since this is a dining room (i'm assuming, since you mentioned a china cabinet - a room that won't get as much abuse as, say, a rec room) and since it's all inside corners (outside corners tend to get some wear) and since it's only above a chair rail (most wear would be below that, theoretically), you'll "probably" be okay.
 
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Old 04-11-06, 01:07 PM
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Well, being cheap came back to bite me. I ran out of paper with only a strip and about a half to go. So I just ordered another double-roll so I can finish. What a racket. Sheesh!

I'll tell you what, I don't know if I'll ever wallpaper again. I had the hardest time trimming the paper. I tried all kinds of different types of cutting tools. From utility knives to X-Acto knives to double-edged razor blades (I have the scars on my fingers to attest to that). Brand new blades right out of the box would cut fine for a little ways and then tear the paper. It was pretty frustrating. In the end the one that worked the best was the el-cheapo cutter that came in my el-cheapo wallpapering tools kit. The kind where you snap off the worn piece to reveal a fresh edge. But it still snagged and tore the paper.

In my case though, because I papered between chair rail and crown molding, I think I'm going to go over the ends of the paper with caulking to hide some of the crappy cutting work. My wife kept asking me why I wanted to try wallpapering so bad. I told her just that; I wanted to just try it once. Well, I accomplished that.
 
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Old 04-11-06, 01:11 PM
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oh, no! i hate to even ask this, because i'm afraid i know the answer, but............you WERE using a straightedge (6" broad knife) to hold the paper while you ran the blade along it to cut the paper, right????

you've gotta hold the paper down really tight with that broad knife, and then run the razor sharp blade pretty firmly against the straight edge to get a clean cut. without the broad knife, it'll just rip. it is soggy wet paper after all......

how'd your corners & seams turn out? (you didn't overlap ALL the seams, did you? just the one in the corner, right??)
 
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Old 04-11-06, 01:38 PM
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STRAIGHTEDGE!? Sorry, just kidding. Yes I had a straightedge. I tried a couple different ones too. I tried different angles on the straightedge and different angles on the knife. Pretty much I had the same results. I'm thinking maybe I wasn't pressing down hard enough with the straightedge. The toughest parts were the left-hand corners. I'm right-handed, and the straightedge kept getting in the way of the knife and vice-versa.

Most of the seams ended up alright. There were a few that bowed a little. I must have stretched the paper a little as I was working it. I managed to work them all out pretty much except for one. The more I messed with it the more I messed it up. I left it alone because it will be hidden behind the china cabinet.

I overlapped only in the corners and used vinyl-to-vinyl adhesive. And for a brand new house I've sure got some out of plumb walls!

In the end it wasn't all that bad. I definitely learned what to do. And more importantly what not to do.
 
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Old 04-11-06, 01:44 PM
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yep, those left-wall corners are hard for righties. if i think i'm in a situation where the paper's going to rip, i just lightly score it with the knife and then lift the paper out & cut it along the score line with scissors. seems archaic, but it's better than ripping it.

it sounds like you did pretty well, all in all, for a first time attempt. i'm glad you weren't dealing with 8-foot long strips, or longer. that can be quite a circus act.

so............did you prime the walls first with a wallpaper primer, so you can get it off later? or will that be the next owner's nightmare??
 
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Old 04-11-06, 02:30 PM
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No I primed it. The local wallpaper store recommended it. They said the "new house" paint is way too cheap and thin. It made it nice and easy to slide the paper around too. Almost too easy. More than once I turned around to get my squeegee and found the paper sliding down the wall. I won't be peeling it down for quite some time (I hope), but it should be easier when that day comes too.
 
 

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