Removing faux brick


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Old 11-08-07, 12:34 PM
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Removing faux brick

My kitchen has a wall covered in plastic brick paneling which we want to remove.The bricks are individual plastic bricks and the problem is to remove the adhesive under them.We dont want to damage the wall too badly but we really want to get rid of the bricks and paint the wall.Any suggestions on removing the adhesive(which looks like the same stuff used to hold on the plastic tiles in the bathroom) without having to completely redrywall the kitchen?Thanks
 
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Old 11-08-07, 01:26 PM
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Maybe someone has a better answer for you but when we moved in our house, we had those things on the kitchen walls and the only way to get rid of them was to tear down the walls and put up new drywall. I can't imagine there's any other way to take them off.
 
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Old 11-09-07, 05:25 PM
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You need to rip this stuff off and sand all the drywall substrate down to no loose paper. They buy at the paint stores a primer for this exact kind of thing, to prevent bubbles. Then skim coat this surface at least two times sanding between each coat. Prime and paint.

This is not an easy job at all. You will need to decide to reconditioned the old drywall or install new. I would recondition the old.

I have the tools though.

Good luck!
 
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Old 11-09-07, 05:46 PM
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We tried different things to get them off, but the walls were just coming off with those bricks.
 
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Old 11-09-07, 06:41 PM
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No easy way for those things

It would probably be easier just to rip down the drywall, bricks and all, and replace it
Removing the bricks from the sheetrock will most assuredly leave the sheetrock in poor enough condition that replacement would be a viable option

Best case for brick removal, the sheetrock is all torn up, ripped, and fuzzy, but still covers
Coat with Gardz sealer
Fill in deep holes with a few coats of joint compound
Skim coat the whole area with joint compound
Primer
Paint

As the entire area will need at least a few coats of joint compound and a skim coat (of joint compound), the labor to re-rock is actually comparable-if not LESS
It wouldn't take much damage for re-rocking to be much less labor
 
 

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