Any suggestions for "aging" a new piece of wallpaper?

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Old 07-14-08, 10:03 AM
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Any suggestions for "aging" a new piece of wallpaper?

I had to replace a small (about 3" x 4") piece of wallpaper in my kitchen. The original wallpaper is over 10 years old, and has discolored somewhat over the years (smoke, dust, etc). Being new, the patched piece stands out. Is there a trick to "aging" the new piece? It's a beige color, with a faint background pattern.

Thanks...

Paul
 
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Old 07-14-08, 03:08 PM
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Have you tried cleaning the old wallpaper?
 
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Old 07-14-08, 05:01 PM
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Yes, unfortunately, I had already cleaned the old wallpaper before making the repair. It got somewhat cleaner, but it doesn't look like the new piece.
 
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Old 07-14-08, 06:14 PM
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Standard wall paper has a protective acrylic coating. Age, sunlight, gas heat, cigarette smoke will over time yellow. Borrow a piece for repair from an inconspicuous place such as behind a piece of furniture. You will need to cut a larger piece than the area to be repaired, so you can match pattern, and cut through both layers at once to have a precise cut for the match. Then, patch the area where you robbed a patch in the same way. To remove the patch will take some care to not damage the paper. Perhaps wetting the paper and heating with blow dryer would help ease off the patching material.
 
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Old 07-14-08, 07:09 PM
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There is a point when the old wallcovering is to discolored. No trick to staining the new. I always recommend customers to store there wallpaper unsealed. Twelvepole has your best option for rescue. Maybe try Clorox gel to clean the old. Good luck.
 
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Old 07-24-08, 07:38 AM
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Sponging a strong solution of hot tea or coffee might work or you could try soaking steel wool in white vinegar overnight then strain solution for aging effects. Brush it on in thin layers then immediately wipe off to build the effect. Make sure the piece you are aging is cut larger that the patch because the ends will stain darker and you will want to trim that away. Good Luck - Stella
 
 

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