Glue left behind after wallpaper removal.


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Old 02-16-12, 06:33 PM
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Glue left behind after wallpaper removal.

The wall paper came off really easy. I would just lift up a corner and pull the whole sheet off in one fell swoop, however there is a ton of glue residue left on the wall. I need to paint the walls where the wallpaper was. I don't know if I should sand it and skim coat it with j/c where the voids are. Should I prime it with an oil based primer before skim coating or should I just skim coat it then prime it so that I don't have to prime twice?
Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanx

Jim
 
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Old 02-16-12, 06:44 PM
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I uses a spray bottle with water and scraped it right off with a putty knife.

An old carpenter taught me that.

They sell stuff in the store for this purpose but it cost $$$. Water works just as good.

The pros will off thier advice. But I did 3- 1970's rooms with no issues. All original wallpaper behind paneling. No sheetrock paper came off in the process. Just take your time and do one area at a time. Dont try to do to much.

Mike NJ
 

Last edited by lawrosa; 02-16-12 at 09:36 PM.
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Old 02-16-12, 07:56 PM
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Thanx lawrosa. Sounds like a plan. I will try that.

Jim
 
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Old 02-17-12, 08:09 PM
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Well I tried your suggestion, the glue did soften up, however it would have taken forever to scrape all that glue residue of the walls. Plus the possible damage to the drywall underneath from the scraping. So my original question remains: Should I prime before skim coating over the glue residue with the j/c or after skim coating or does it matter?

Thanx

Jim
 
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Old 02-17-12, 09:24 PM
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Removing residual Paste

Since there are almost as many paste formulas as there are wallpapers, some can be easy and some just do not want to dissolve. If it seems daunting, allow what you have attempted to thoroughly dry...give it a few days or stick a fan in the room and move the air for a day or two.Once it is thoroughly dry, light sand with 80 or 100 grit s/p just to remove any really high, dried goop. Then coat it with an alkyd (aka oil based) primer. If you are game, once it is dried (another two days, min), you can go ahead and skim coat the walls with a Vinyl Spackle. Pay particular attention to the kind of Spackle that I am recommending, here. There are all kinds of Spackle, today. And A lot of it is absolute garbage. Definitely do NOT use the "quick" Spackle that looks white. IT ISN'T SANDABLE.After that dries, you can sand again. Then, towel off the walls with some damp microfiber towels to remove the residual dust. That is important...dust free is necessary for the paint to stick well. Then, if you wish or if you have a lot of wall area that you had to skim coat, you may want to consider priming, again before applying the finish paint.It took me a number of removal jobs before I had a tried-and-tested removal plan.I use Safe-and-Simple (a CA product so its safe) Removal Solution. Comes in a Gallon size and goes a LONG WAY. 2-4 oz makes a gallon of solution. I mixed it in a garden sprayer (a new one is recommended)It's more often than not a messy job. You lay older towels down, lengthwise, along the baseboard. If you can get full sheets of wallpaper to come off, lay them down, back-side-up, to collect moisture when you spray the walls. I always used a 4" wide Werner Scraper. The kind with a handle that is about a foot long. It has replaceable razor blades that get screwed in tightly. BY reason of use, you will learn just how much of an angle that you will shave the wall at without gouging the wallboard. It takes practice. Once the wallcovering is off, I re-wet the wall again; wait two minutes and re-wet again. After a few more minutes the paste has been softened by the enzyme solution (S&S) and you are ready to make a bigger mess by shaving the residueal paste off the walls. Once that is done, you need to immediately wipe the walls down again with, first, a saturated microfiber towe with removal solutionl, then, a damp one with a TSP solution on it to finish the cleaning of the wall. Costco sells the perfect size microfiber towels in a 36 count bag for $19. I use the heck out of them for everything, wash them and reuse them. After you have performed all of these steps, you can skim-coat the walls, as above, once they dry. If you don't want to go through all of that, go back to the beginning of this post and follow my original directions for alkyd primer.ORyou can purchase Zinsser Gardz. I've posted about this product, recently. It penetrates everything that is porous and encapsulates anything left on the wall surface and then it cures and you can't sand it so you have to have the walls clean of debris. The residual paste can remain and the Gardz encapsulates it. I love this stuff. You MUST apply it with a microfiber roller cover. I think Lowes sells them. Good luck.
 
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Old 02-18-12, 04:16 PM
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Thank you for all that great info papernpaste. I will prime the walls with the oil based primer before I skim coat.

Jim
 
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Old 02-23-12, 02:43 PM
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Well I had a guy that was really good with spackle and he did an excellent job skimcoating the walls, however it is not finished and he is somewhat undependable, so I need to finish myself. I am not good at spackling. I tried to spackle the regular way and I made a mess of the walls (I will have to do a lot of sanding). My question is can I thin the spackle with water and roll it on with a paint roller then blade it to smooth it out?


Thanx


Jim
 
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Old 02-23-12, 04:19 PM
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Spackle can't be thinned but I assume you are using joint compound which can be thinned. Thinning the j/c a little will help! If you have trouble skimming a large area - break it up into a few smaller areas. Leave a gap in between and then fill in those areas once the j/c has dried. A sanding pole or block will do a better job of sanding than sandpaper held in your hand.
 
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Old 02-24-12, 04:19 AM
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Working with spackle

A drywall finisher taught me a little trick that has helped me immensely over the years. It is better to work with successive THIN coats of spackle that will dry more quickly, won't crack in the process of drying.If you apply a fairly thin coat of spackle to a surface and it dries and is fairly smooth, DON'T sand, YET. When you apply a second thin coat of spackle, IMMEDIATELY go back over the applied area with the same broad-knife, applying a little pressure to remove all but the least amount of spackle. PRESTO! You'll have a real clean, SMOOTH, freshly spackled surface. The key here is to immediately remove all but the thinest coating and, when so doing, you'll find that it really looks good. Try to work with it- practice- and you'll see what I mean.If you apply successive coats in this fashion, you still may have to light-sand but, you won't have to sand nearly as much.When you purchase spackle, look for "vinyl" spackle, at least for your last finish coats. It makes for a cleaner finish IMO.Also, if you ARE applying successive coats to an area that you HAVE sanded, wipe the sanded area off with a damp towel ( preferrably a microfiber towel) to remove residual dust BEFORE applying another coat of spackle to the sanded surface. When you DON'T do this, you'll get the dry spackle dust from the surface rolling into your fresh new coat making it a mess.Good luck.
 

Last edited by papernpaste; 02-24-12 at 04:28 AM. Reason: poor word usage
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Old 02-24-12, 04:30 PM
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Thanx again for that great info papernpaste.

Jim
 
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Old 02-25-12, 01:37 PM
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Well my idea worked out pretty good. I thinned the j/c with some water, applied it with a 9" roller with a 1/2" nap. I applied the j/c to a small (probably no more than 4'x4' section) area. Then bladed it smooth. It came out almost as good as my friends, however not as thick.

Jim
 

Last edited by jmnew51; 02-25-12 at 01:38 PM. Reason: Forgot to add something.
  #12  
Old 03-27-12, 06:54 PM
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Something on wall after removing paper

I remove the wall paper from a plaster wall (not drywall) and washed the wall, and thought there was glue left behind, but the coating is rubbery. I can actually, carefully pull it away from the plaster as a sheet that is rubbery and even stretches like rubber.

Am I removing something that is useful and should be left on the plaster?

If it does need removed and I'm down to bare plaster, does it need treated with something before I can paint it or tile over it? The plaster is not dusty behind this strange rubbery coating.

-Chuck J
 
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Old 03-28-12, 05:05 AM
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Welcome to the forums Chuck!

I'm not sure what a rubbery coating would be but it wouldn't be part of the plaster. It would probably be best to remove it. You'd hate to paint over it and then have it start to loose it's bond with the wall

I'm not real familiar with it but they do make a wallpaper backer that's applied over cracking plaster to help hold everything together...... don't know if that's what you have
 
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Old 03-28-12, 09:03 AM
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marksr,
Thanks for the reply.

The plaster beneath this film is in very good shape, no cracks, and smooth, yet it if I rub my hand along the bare plaster there is some dust on my fingers. I don't think it's recommended to paper over bare plaster, so I'm wondering if this is something put on there to allow the paper to adhere and maybe I shouldn't remove it. If I take it down to bare plaster, won't I have to re-coat it with something, anyway? It's a wall about 8 or 9 high by 12 long. I want to either paint it or tile it.

-Chuck
 
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Old 03-28-12, 09:09 AM
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I'd be inclined to remove it because anything you attach to it is only as good as the rubber film. If the rubber looses it bond with the plaster, then any paint or tile will also come off. If the wall is still chalky after removal, use Zinnser's Gardz primer. That will alleviate any bonding issues with paint, I'm not sure about tile.
 
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Old 03-28-12, 10:03 AM
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marksr,
Thanks for the help. I really appreciate it.
-Chuck
 
 

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