Wallpaper and Primer


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Old 08-14-12, 06:11 PM
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Wallpaper and Primer

Hello,

I removed wallpaper in my kitchen and the primer came partially with so that is looks like Swiss Cheese now.

What can I do?

Thank you
 
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Old 08-14-12, 08:26 PM
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You could retexture and reprime (before you paint) the wall. Depending on how large of an area you need to repair, you could buy the texture in a spray can or rent the spray gun.

Or, if the damage goes into the drywall itself, you could either repair the holes with joint compound (and then retexture/reprime) or replace the drywall.
 
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Old 08-15-12, 03:16 AM
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If you have any exposed gypsum, you need to coat those areas with either an oil base primer or Zinnser's Gardz. That will prevent the moisture in joint compound or latex paint from causing further damage. If you post a pic or two we might be able to offer more advice.
 
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Old 08-15-12, 06:46 AM
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So put an oil based primer first before the compound?

I'll post a picture later this day.

Thank you
 
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Old 08-15-12, 07:10 AM
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Yes, oil based primer or Zinsser Gardz over the exposed gypsum, then the joint compound.
 
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Old 08-15-12, 07:50 AM
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I read that in such case a slow drying oil based primer is recommended.
But which one? Kilz and Zinsser Gardz drying to fast.
 
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Old 08-15-12, 08:11 AM
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This is exactly what Gardz was designed to do.

Why slow drying? That doesn't make any sense to me.
 
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Old 08-15-12, 09:34 AM
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Just what I read. SOme also recommend Kilz, but I ordered this Zinsser Gardz. I hope it is good as they say.
 
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Old 08-15-12, 09:34 AM
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I read that in such case a slow drying oil based primer is recommended.

I've never heard anything like that ?? Slow drying primers are good when you need the substrate to really absorb the primer like raw exterior wood, not needed when priming drywall. I usually use either kilz [or similar] or pigmented shellac to prime raw gypsum - mostly because I always have one of them on hand

Most any solvent based primer will work fine. As far as I know, Gardz is the only water based primer that will do a good job over raw gypsum.
 
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Old 08-15-12, 09:49 AM
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I've used Gardz before, it did exactly what I expected it to do.
 
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Old 08-15-12, 07:09 PM
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Here is a pic how the walls look like after removing the wallpaper.

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And this layer of wallpaper wont come off. I tried everything but I can't even scrape it with a putty knife off.

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Old 08-16-12, 04:33 AM
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How you gotten the wall wet? or just tried to remove the wallpaper dry? The wallpaper backing is usually the easiest part to remove. If getting it wet doesn't help, try scoring the paper with a utility knife and then rewet the wall.

If all else fails, sand the wall and coat with an oil base primer or gardz.
 
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Old 08-16-12, 05:06 AM
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I tried with how water, hot water and softener, used this wallpaper tiger. Nothing. It sticks like s....
Do you mean just leave it, sand it and put gardz on? And that works?
 
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Old 08-16-12, 05:28 AM
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If it is stuck that hard, it should be ok to prime over it. While it's always best to remove all the wallpaper - sometimes you have to do what you have to do
 
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Old 08-16-12, 06:19 AM
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I'll try to reomove more of it, but I think I wont be able to.

Thank you
 
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Old 08-16-12, 06:46 AM
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Yeah, sometimes it's not worth the effort - sand it smooth and move on.

As Mark said, if it's that well-adhered, it should be fine to leave it anyway.
 
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Old 08-16-12, 07:27 AM
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Should I try DIF from Zinsser first?
 
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Old 08-16-12, 07:28 AM
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It sounds to me like you've put in enough work on this, I'd sand it smooth and leave it.
 
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Old 08-16-12, 09:11 AM
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I am afraid that it doesnt work or looking good with the layer still on.
 
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Old 08-16-12, 03:38 PM
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After you prime with gardz or oil, you'll apply a thin coat of j/c over the edges of the paper [maybe the whole thing] Once all the repairs are made and sanded smooth - you shouldn't be able to see/feel any of the bad spots.

While I only strip wallpaper occasionally [when I can't get someone else to do it] I'm convinced that none of the commercially prepared or homemade concoctions work - it's all in the moisture! You get the adhesive wet and it will turn loose from the wall. The hard part is getting the adhesive wet while not harming the wall or flooring.
 
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Old 08-16-12, 06:20 PM
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I went to homedepot today for a tool and I could not resist. I saw a bottle of DIF concentrate and I thought what the heck, for $5.xx you cant do anything wrong. So I tried it and what can I say? It really works. I mean the layer did not come off in one peace but at least I could scrape it off with a putty knife. It may take me a while to get the layers off but then I am on the saver side using Gardz and j/c.
 
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Old 08-18-12, 01:58 PM
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Hey guys, just want to make sure:

I apply Guardz, then j/c and sand, then primer and paint.

right?

Or do I have to sand the edges from the loosing paint first?

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Thank you
 
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Old 08-18-12, 03:55 PM
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Yep, although if you can get rid of the edges that stick up - the j/c work will be easier
 
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Old 08-19-12, 04:22 AM
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You can reduce your prep time by purchasing a wall scraper with a replacable razor sharp 4" blade. My experience has been that the pre-wallpaper primer < the white stuff in the pictures> is "rubbery" and doesn't sand well unless you wait a week for it and the wallboard to dry out completely. The 4" razor sharp blade scraper can be angled in such a fashion that you can carefully scrape the high edges off of the damaged spots before spackling. Use successive, light coats of spackle rather than applying it heavily Then, go to work with the 4" scraper, going just deep enough to get between the old paper that you want to remove and the fragile wet surface of the wallboard. This job is not for the faint-of-heart but with patience, you'll win. It's some of the hardest work that I have done in the past...now retired
 
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Old 08-19-12, 04:39 AM
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The 4" scraper has a 15" handle.
 
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Old 08-19-12, 08:02 AM
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Old 08-20-12, 04:36 AM
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Either one will work although the 2nd one has a longer handle and might be more comfortable to use. Care will need to be used with either one to minimize damage to the drywall.
 
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Old 08-20-12, 06:33 AM
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Thank you. Have done it yesterday. Now waiting for the Guardz.
 
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Old 08-20-12, 11:27 AM
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Definately the HD choice.You have to get used to using it without opening up your own skin.If you find the right angle to approach the wall, working slowly, You'll be able to get the high edges off without tearing up the good areas of surface. If after working with it for a couple of hours, it seems to be digging into everything, change the blade for a new one. and work gingerly/slowly when the blade is brand new. This is time consuming but, if you have the time,it will turn out well.
 
 

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