What wallpaper is this?

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Old 11-29-18, 05:19 AM
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What wallpaper is this?

Hi there, i'm new to this forum but desperately after some help with trying to match this specific design wallpaper to one of my jobs. Usually we can match it up but this is one that's extremely difficult to match. Thanks, Theo
 
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Old 11-29-18, 06:32 AM
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Good luck. You're just going to have to do your research and locate it. I would say it's quite old and probably out of production. If your budget allows you can search out someone to custom make some for you but I imagine it would be several hundred dollars just to get started and may have a comma in the price.

Another option might be to make a mold of the pattern with casting resin. Then use the mold to make the pattern in plaster. It's often done for ceiling medallions and crown molding so I don't know how well it would hold up next to a stair where it can get bumped ans scraped. You might cast the pattern in resin which would be more durable. Just pick a resin that you will be able to paint. You could glue the resin pattern onto the wall then paint and get a pretty good match if you are handy and willing to invest a bit of money and considerable time.
 
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Old 11-29-18, 07:07 AM
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I've spoken to some of the original larger companies in the UK but no such luck. What i've done is speak to my cornice mouldings man and he may be able to make a section as you say from plaster.

Thanks for the advice, much appreciated.
 
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Old 11-29-18, 09:32 AM
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Smile fairly easy fix is possible

They are machine punctures.
If you wish to make them "go away," I recommend these steps:

If you have any wallcovering scraps in what could be called selvage or left over, take it to a paint store and ask them to make up the smallest available can (probably a quart) to match the color of the paper IN A FLAT LUSTER. Chose a paint, even if it ceiling paint, that is totally flat in luster...NOT Matte Flat as this has a very slight sheen when dry.

If you haven't any scraps, you can go to the paint store and choose a number of off-white paint swatches. Take them home and find the one(s) that most closely match the wallcovering color. Make notes to go with the swatches that come closely to a match (like: this is slightly too orange or pink of too gray, etc.)

The puncture marks are, from my experience, a machine roll puncture OR it could have happened in the packaging or shipping process. I can see where it may have been overlooked.

If the paint isn't thick enough to fill the holes (and it probably isn't), you could take a dab of spackle (you'll need very little) on your finger and lightly touch it to each hole. I would wait until that has dried thoroughly (24 hours) and compare the color of the dried spackle to the wallcovering. Any spackle will work, even the new stuff like "fast-and-final". If it peaks or seems rough going on, while it is still damp, wet your finger with some saliva and "smooth" it down before allowing to dry.

Once the spackle dries use a small brush, preferably a arts-and-crafts *small brush.and paint as little area as it takes to cover and allow to dry. It may be wise to only paint one small area of your repairs so that you can confirm that the dried paint color matches well.

You can do this.
 
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