Zinnser Gardz disaster?

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-10-02, 07:37 PM
Alwayssomething
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Zinnser Gardz disaster?

I stripped off the old wallpaper as I mentioned in my last post, and the drywall started bubbling up. I realized that whoever put the old wallpaper on probably did not primer or seal. I stopped at that point and asked advice. I decided to continue taking off the remaining paper backing as that seemed to be the first step. I was successful in removing the remaining paper backing, but did have occasional bubbling which I planned on cutting around, sanding and sealing with Zinnsler Gardz which seemd easier and less toxic than Kilz Original. So I spent a day cutting out bubbles and sanding. Today I tried applying the Zinnsler Gardz and more than half of the wall bubbled up in more and all different places. The directions on the can said to "cut out" the bubbles. So I started cutting out bubbles again. The only problem is as I am cutting out bubbles I am making more tears and bubbles, and I am afraid that I will never get the surface even again. I also wonder if as soon as I finish sanding and reapplying Gardz if I'll get more bubbles, and how days am I going to redo doing this until the bubbling stops. I had planned on using joint compound after applying the Gardz, but now I'm thinking that I will not be able to get a smooth square surface. I was going to wallpaper again, but now I wonder if I should just texture the wall and eat the cost of the paper. I think installing brand new sheetrock would have been easier, smoother, and way less time consuming. Now I know why people hire professionals to install wallpaper. I thought this would be something I could do, and feel like I have tried to be patient with the setbacks, but now I'm wondering when and if this project will ever get done without hiring a professional. What did I do wrong?
 
  #2  
Old 02-11-02, 09:18 AM
W
Member
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
Posts: 618
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
You should be able to come out smelling like a rose on this one. Once you have all the bubbles cut out, you should go over any wall irregularities with joint compound. Be sure to get all the bad spots, then take your time and sand down these areas as smooth as you can get them. Then go over it again with a coat of Gardz. You shouldn't have any more problems with bubbling after this second coat and you should be left with a smooth, hard as a rock surface ready for your new wallpaper.

Another alternate solution if you don't want to go this route is to install bridging material. This is blank wallpaper sold at home improvement stores designed to be painted or papered over. It is around $8-10 for a double roll. This will smooth any damaged areas of your wall. Some people apply a skim (very thin) coat of joint compound over this liner to create a perfectly smooth surface. This option would be many times cheaper than having new drywall installed.

Its too bad that you have had to learn such an unfortunate lesson about wallpaper. Please let me know how your project went, any more problems, and what you ended up doing.
 
  #3  
Old 02-11-02, 04:03 PM
Alwayssomething
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
The case of the disappearing bubbles...

Since I did not have time to finish cutting out the bubbles yesterday, today when I went to go finish the job, some of the bubbles have disappeared. I circled them last night with a sheet rock knife but you can't see them today. Should I try and gauge up the places where they were or should I just go over with another coat over Gardz? I am cutting out all the ones that still look bubbled. By the way, This is a wonderful site! Thank you for your help.
 
  #4  
Old 02-11-02, 06:55 PM
W
Member
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
Posts: 618
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I would take a brush and spot prime over those areas that you circled and see if they bubbled back up. I don't think I can explain what happened with the disappearing bubbles correctly, but I am pretty sure that if you spot prime they won't return. I am guessing that if you tried to remove those areas, you would find that it is difficult anyway because the bubbles were caused by the primer "working" in the bad spots. I suggest spot priming and patching bad areas today, then check the results tomorrow. You should then follow up with a thin coat of Gardz over at least the repaired areas, if not the entire surface again for good measure. Let me know how it goes.....
 
  #5  
Old 02-12-02, 08:37 AM
T
Member
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Herts U.K
Posts: 542
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
When a papered surface is wet then bubbles often occur...Never make a decision at this point as of what to do with them(tempting as it is)....Let everything dry out and 9 times out of ten the bubbles will dry out as tight as a drum..This goes for wet paint as well as filler/joint compound over a drywall surface..
If wet paper is filled then the paper will often bubble along with the filler...The filler then dries faster then the paper resulting in a bubbled wall that will not dry back..
 
  #6  
Old 02-12-02, 09:03 AM
Alwayssomething
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Little pieces of information can save so much time!

Thank you toptosher. I wish the Zinnser Gardz directions on the can would have shared this little piece of information. One line could have said, "Wait until dry then cut out remaining bubbles." That could have saved me some work. I guess they are not expecting novices who don't know anything to try and attempt these projects!
 
  #7  
Old 02-12-02, 02:25 PM
DMCIL
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Do not feel bad. This has happened to me and three family members. We all found different solutions. The best this - if you are to use wallpaper again you will not need a pERFECT surface.

I think the bubbles occur after the underlying sheetrock paper is penetrated with a paper scoring device. Then the chemical stripper is used (DIF) and seeps between the paper and sheet rock causing the bubble. Once the chemicals evaporate and absorb into the sheet rock the buble disappears and may re adhere to the shhet rock . However the previously bubbled area is not as stable as before and may bubble again. That is my experience.

I solved the problem (albeit limited in our bathroom) by taking the dry wall paper off, sanding the edges, painting the area with primer (water based), then using an easy to use spackle compound and making the surface as flat as possible. before it was dry I painted another coat of primer. It sanded great and looks great. Area where I did not do that - dont look so hot.

My brother in law used a thin layer of dry wall joint compound and it looks great but takes talent.My sister in law - unfortunately used the new sheet rock method. Good luck
 
  #8  
Old 02-12-02, 02:38 PM
mikejmerritt
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Alwayssomething, Once you have finished patching and spot priming patched areas as Wallpaper suggests and have no visible bubbles remember that the paste/water on the paper can cause more bubbles but as Toptosher said about bubbles caused by patching they will almost always dry down in a day. It can be nerve racking to continue hanging when bubbles are popping up as you go but don't worry. If any doubt about this, stop and let what you have hung dry out and you'll be pleasantly surprised to see the paper has drawn tight to the wall...Best of luck on your project.....Mike
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: