Newbie Drywall Questions


  #1  
Old 09-10-02, 11:50 AM
OldRod
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Question Newbie Drywall Questions

Ok, I'm attempting my first DIY drywall project soon and since I've only done minor repairs before, I have a few questions before tackling a whole room

1 - is drywall thickness accurate? By that I mean is a 1/2" sheet actually 1/2" thick? Or is it less? I'm replacing drywall around some doors and want it to match up with the casing. The existing drywall is 3/8" but I didn't know if that was 3/8 or 1/2 drywall. (Why are wood dimensions so confusing? )

2 - I have a room with 8 ft. ceilings. Is it better to lay one piece vertically, or two pieces horizontally? I've heard both. The pieces that were on the wall were vertical and there were lots of seam problems, etc. I'd like to avoid that in the future.

3 - Is it ok to have a seam over the center of a doorway or window? I know you shouldn't have a seam at the corner, but wondered about over the middle.

Thanks for any help you can provide

Rod
 
  #2  
Old 09-10-02, 12:39 PM
dickh
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yes it's accurate. but you can always measure it if you aren't sure.

put the drywall on horizontally because it is stronger and easier.

personally prefer not to have vertical seams at doors and windows if i can help it but if i have to i try to put them in the middle. can't give you a good reason for that except an old carpenter i cant even remember any more told me to.
 
  #3  
Old 09-10-02, 12:43 PM
G
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The reason that you don't put a seam at the corner of a door or window is that if they rack for some reason, the drywall seam will crack
 
  #4  
Old 09-10-02, 12:46 PM
tedn333
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1/2" sheetrock is 1/2" thick and 3/8 is 3/8. By laying the sheetrock horizontally, you end up with less seams but you could end up with a lot of butt joints unless you go to a drywall distributor who handles 12, 14, and 16 ft. sheets. If you can handle the longer sheets you will save a lot of time. Butt joints are okay but take more feathering to look smooth.
 
  #5  
Old 09-10-02, 12:47 PM
tedn333
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If at all possible, avoid seams over dooways.
 
  #6  
Old 09-10-02, 01:30 PM
OldRod
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Thanks everyone
 
  #7  
Old 09-11-02, 10:35 AM
Davef15
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Horizontal seams do not show up as much in artificle light. However, as one poster pointed out and I highly suggest, if you can handle 16 footers by all means do so - it cuts down on the butt joints.
 
 

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