Coping Molding


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Old 10-07-02, 09:21 AM
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Coping Molding

I'm in the process of laying baseboard molding. I've read that the best way to finish inside corners is using coped joints rather than mitering. I've tried to make a few coped joints on scrap but can't seem to quite get the hang of it. The few things on "how to do it" seem a little confusing. They often recommend putting the "butted" piece in the corner first then mitering an "open miter" on the second piece to be coped. Placing it against the butted piece and tracing the profile. This doesn't seem to wrok or make alot of sense. It would seem easier to simply take two flat pieces. Place one piece in the corner than put the other piece against it & trace its outline on the other piece & than cut it using a coping saw. I don't quite see the benefit of cutting the "open miter" first. What am I missing? Any hints? Any sites or places with good videos/illustrations on the topic. In this case I think a picture would be worse a thousand words.
 
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Old 10-08-02, 02:45 PM
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You should put the straight cut piece of molding in first. You then cut an inside 45 on the piece that you will be putting there next. The 45 will give you the corect pattern to cut. When you use your coping saw to cut the waste out, angle it back at about 5 degrees. It make the mating edges easier to put together.
 
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Old 10-08-02, 03:21 PM
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Are you painting or staining?

If painting, you can cope and not have to too precise and just caulk the joint to fill the voids.

If staining, you shoudl try for a tight fit. Use a wood rasp or sanding block to fit the pieces.
 
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Old 10-08-02, 05:13 PM
TomBT
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Good luck, this is one that you almost need to see before doing. Go to the Lowe's webpage, they have some free "how to do" videos that might help you. And remember when installing trim, caulk is your best friend.
 
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Old 10-08-02, 06:09 PM
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I plan on painting, not staining. I still don't see the advantage to cutting a 45 versus just tracing the profile of the other piece and than cutting that out. Angling the coping saw back a few degrees does make sense.
 
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Old 10-10-02, 09:59 AM
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Cutting the 45 *gives* you the profile. What I do is then take a pencil and run the edge of the lead down at the front of the miter cut. Makes it easier to see to follow the profile as I'm cutting the joint. You can also trace it off of course if you're very careful, it's really difficult to be quite as accurate doing it that way as opposed to doing the 45 thing first.
 
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Old 10-10-02, 10:25 AM
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try this!!

I've found an attractive alternative to having to cope the edges of baseboards. You can buy little decorative blocks that are placed in each interior corner. They usually stand just a little taller than the baseboards themselves. Place the blocks in all your corners first then just butt the baseboard up to it. No coping or mitering required!! And it adds a professional, decorative touch that the wife loves!!
 
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Old 10-10-02, 08:16 PM
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Thanks for your feedback. I'll try some of the suggestions & let you know.
 
 

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