dry wall "bubbles"


  #1  
Old 10-17-02, 09:43 AM
headhunterlindy
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Angry dry wall "bubbles"

Help!

I am having a problem with light weight Sheetrock joint compound. After making repairs, priming, and then painting with a quality semi gloss paint, I am experiencing bubbling in the final coat of paint. I believe that this is caused by existing pin holes caused by air escape in the joint compound. I saw no problem after the primer coat, but did have some air holes in the repaired area. The sheet rock primer paint did not bubble.

What is the easiest method to solve this problem? I would guess that I would have to sand the dried bubbles in the finished coat, fill the pin holes in the sheet rock, re-prime, and re-paint. Is there a better way?

Should I have repaired the pin holes in my repair before I painted? They are very small, and I would have thought them to be unnoticeable after painting.

Does anyone know why the light weight compound bubbles? I have had this problem with it before...but don't have it when I use the standard Sheetrock compound.
 
  #2  
Old 10-17-02, 07:54 PM
Hollywood
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
I wish there were an easier way for you , But there isn't

After you primed you should of went around the walls with a bright light to look for all the Imperfection's and touched them up and spot primed those area's again and then painted

as far as the Air Bubbles it's pretty common, Did the wall's already have paint on them? 'cause you tend to get a whole lot of "Mystery Bubbles"

I wish I knew how to avoid them Also,
 
  #3  
Old 10-17-02, 09:58 PM
bungalow jeff
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Hah, my wife, who thinks I spend too much effort on prep work, thought I snapped as I walked along the stair wall I am repairing with a flashlight, sanding sponge, and trowl of mud.
 
  #4  
Old 10-18-02, 07:30 AM
headhunterlindy
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Hollywood, thanks for the reply. I was afraid of that!
 
  #5  
Old 10-18-02, 09:10 AM
Hollywood
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
just be thankful your jobs are small. lol

I MUST go around hundred's YES Hundreds of board's and touch up and yes don't forget about them 60' high ceilings that are dome shaped with hundred's of recessed lights just waiting to be touched up.

and some people say: Why bother nobody is going to see those imperfections wayyyy up there. BUT I do and Quality is #1.
 
  #6  
Old 10-18-02, 09:23 AM
headhunterlindy
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
You'd think that they could come up with a compound that bubbles less. That has to be a horribly time consuming step for you, after you've done the job and sanded, and could be ready to paint! I remembered (after I bought the lightweight) that I have had less bubbling with the standard compound than the lightweight...no more lightweight for me. Other than the fact the pail is lighter, I see no benefit.

What a waste of time in the process...especially for a professional.
 
  #7  
Old 10-18-02, 09:39 AM
Hollywood
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Although it isn't as bad as it seem's.

my theory on this would be if the walls have a coat of paint on them to begin with " They are Sealed" so when you go and apply a coat of mud onto it, the moisture from the mud cannot penetrate the painted surface so therefore you get the Bubbles that pop out. "Just my Opinion"


At work we do what is called a Level 5 finish.
what that is after taping and finishing the joints we go back and apply a skim coat to the entire area of the drywall.
to hide all imperfections
 
  #8  
Old 10-18-02, 09:53 AM
headhunterlindy
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
You must work for a quality oriented company. In Alabama, we are lucky if the seams and screws are covered...even in half million dollar homes. That is exactly what I am doing, covering up poor workmanship. I started painting the walls of a 5 year old home that we just purchased, and was embarassed at the results because of poor quality workmanship in the original sheetrock job! We have archways rather than doors, and the installers performed as if they had never seen an archway before. Totally unbelievable!!

My next nightmare will be fixing the damage done when they put wallpaper directly onto raw sheetrock. My wife did a reasonalby good job of removing the paper, but with no paint or sizing under the paper, it caused a fair amount of damage. To add insult to injury, it appears that whoever did the sheet rock knew that the rooms would be papered, the quality there is even worse than in the rooms that were to be painted.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: