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sheetrock over an existing wall


manolo's Avatar
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02-01-03, 03:42 PM   #1  
manolo
sheetrock over an existing wall

I am in the process of putting up drywall over existing paneling. I'm unsure what is best to do with regards to door frames, as they will no longer be flush with the wall, as I am adding 1/2" of thickness. Please advise. Thanks.

 
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02-01-03, 07:01 PM   #2  
The door and window frames will have to be widened to accommodate the thicker wall. Similarly, the baseboards will have to be shortened. Extenders are available for outlet and switch boxes. I imagine that some sort of extender is available for heating and cooling outlets. I don't know what to do about the tack strip if you have carpet, I guess you pull it up and move it, too.

 
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02-03-03, 04:18 PM   #3  
Phil Allen
drywall over paneling

What you have to do is remove all casing and baseboards. Get a table saw and cut 1/2 inch strips from 3/4 inch stock re-1x8's.
Fasten these to existing door and window frames. You can paint or stain to match existing.Install drywall and they will come out even. As for outlet boxes you can use longer screws available at any hardware store. The tabs on the switches and outlets will
hold to the new drywall with the longer screws.Removing all trim and base will also make painting five times as fast. Installing wider trim will cause wide gaps at edges of trim. If you need any further help with my suggestion go to XXX XXXXXXXX and in the search window type in Home Improvement help I'm near the top.
Hope I've been helpful.

Phil

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Last edited by twelvepole; 02-03-03 at 09:45 PM.
 
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02-03-03, 06:19 PM   #4  
brickeyee
The front edge of an electrical box in a noncombustible surface cannot be recessed more than 1/4 inch. Get 3/8 or 1/2 box extensions and fasten them under the receps and switches.

 
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02-03-03, 06:57 PM   #5  
Phil Allen
Outlet box settings

Non combustible surfaces dont burn. It's my impression this job is being done by a home owner who doesn't want to pay union prices. State laws that require the box recess demensions also require that a professional electricians do the work which can also include total upgrades at that time. The odds of a fire due to a short in wireing burning the drywall is far less than the insulation on the inside of the wall. As the home owner already stated there's paneling on the wall which fills the gap the state laws are concerned about.If the box surface is currently even with the drywall under the paneling, and most paneling is 1/4 inch thick. he's already out of code. If the home owner wants to pay a pro
for something thats never going to happen. So be it. I suggest he checks his local codes ahead of time. To many times I see profesional electicians become city inspectors and come up with this bull to feed their own.A short will burn the wire inside and leading out of the box into the wall way befor it burns the surface of the drywall.And this doesn't include the breaker should trip at first sign of short anyway.

 
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02-03-03, 07:04 PM   #6  
Phil Allen
Box depth

I just talked toan electical engineer and he said the 1/4 dpth only applies to new construction, the boxes in question are alreadyat proper settings

 
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02-04-03, 08:02 AM   #7  
brickeyee
I do not know where the original poster is located. Many states allow homeowners to do electrical wiring in their own home. They are required to abide by the code for the jurisdiction.
What state is your ee friend licensed in? If you modify the walls and end up with the boxes recessed more than the code requirement, you are supposed to extend them. I would never stake my seal on telling anyone to not abide by the code.
I hope he never has a fire claim.


Last edited by brickeyee; 02-04-03 at 08:32 AM.
 
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02-06-03, 09:11 PM   #8  
manolo
Thanks to everyone who provided me with advice. The project is coming along nicely, albeit slowly, due to my schedule and inexperience in the area. I did put extenders on all of the boxes (6 outlets & 1 switch). Thanks again to everyone, you've been most helpful!

 
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