Project Guidance


  #1  
Old 02-12-03, 09:04 AM
SaddleTramp
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Question Project Guidance

I live in a split-level house with paneling along the foyer which I would like to replace with drywall. the drywall I would like to install is on either side of the main steps (five up and five down from the main entrance.) I tride papering over the paneling and it looks awful.

Before I start ripping the paneling out, I was wondering if any veterans at this kind of operation can offer any suggestions as to how to proceed.

I have one big question and am eager for any suggestions you all might have.

1. Do I need to remove the steps to install the new drywalland then reinstall the steps?
 
  #2  
Old 02-12-03, 07:09 PM
C
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If you remove the paneling and replace it with sheetrock, you won't remove the steps, just the trim board over them. It serves as a baseboard the same a in the rest of your house.

Take down the paneling.
Put up the sheetrock. Drywall screws are less likely to produce nail pops over time. The baseboard that you removed will fit over the bottom of the sheetrock. If the stairs are carpeted, you will want to consider moving the carpet back to accommodate the baseboard as needed. If it sits over the carpet now, it could go back the same way. Depending upon how your house is trimmed, you may need to plan some sort of baseboard compromise where the base comes along the other walls and meets the stairs. It will be too short after the rock goes up. Paneling is 1/4 inch thick, sheetrock is usually 1/2 inch on walls. If there are outlets or wall switches, you will need to see about box extenders to bring the box out flush with the wall.

Or
Install 1/4 inch sheetrock over the paneling.

Post back if you have any questions.
 
  #3  
Old 02-12-03, 08:39 PM
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removing and replacing your stairs is not a good option...
It will take a small project into an event...

The side skirt might have been slid down below the treads..."not easily removed and replaced"




install 1/4" over the panel and sit it on top of the side skirts...

install shoe base.

or set a circular saw to the depth of the side skirt plus panel minus 1/16th.....cut a line 1/8" above the skirt...
snap back the paneling
install sheetrock 1/8" above the skirt
install shoe base.
 
  #4  
Old 02-13-03, 07:21 AM
SaddleTramp
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GReat stuff. Thanks

I had no idea as to differing sizes of sheet rock.

you all used a couple of terms I dont know-side skirt and shoe base.

It appears that the paneling goes down past the stair treads and where the stairs and the paneling meet, there is no molding. Stairs are not carpeted.


The front edge of the stair is rounded, so I assume it is best practice cut the rock to fit each stair and give a snug fit?


thanks, I am obliged!
 
  #5  
Old 02-13-03, 06:30 PM
C
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making the sheetrock fit

If it were me, and it's not, I would not try to fit the sheetrock against the stairs. Often, there is a board that runs along the stairs with the top edge making a straight line about 6 or 8 inches above the stairs and the bottom edge appears to follow the treads and risers. In fact, as was pointed out, this board is between the steps and the wall.

It may be that when you remove the panelling that you may be able to pull it out from the space between the steps and the wall. You can make a board of 1/4 inch plywood to go back into the space to serve as a trim board. I would try a strip of plywood 10 inches wide and try to slip it in place when you remove the panelling. Align it and mark on the studs with a pencil or chalkline where the top it will be. Run the sheetrock to that point and cut a straight line along these marks. Then take the trim board that you made. Probably be a good idea to finish it first. Slip it in place in the space between the steps and wall and snug against the sheetrock. Attach it to the studs. You will be able to find a piece of trim to fit over the sheetrock and onto the plywood to make the step transition.

Now the fit between the steps and the trim board will look nice and avoid trying to fit the sheetrock.

If the paneling between the steps and wall cannot be removed, make a template with sheets of paper to make a larger template for cutting a piece of plywood to fit against the steps. You will likely be able to cut it pretty close to fitting with a jig saw. It will be much easier to fit than the sheetrock.

Hope this helps.
 
  #6  
Old 02-14-03, 07:19 AM
SaddleTramp
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Indeed it was helpful. I am obliged.
 
 

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