installing a drywall ceiling

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Old 02-28-03, 11:42 PM
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installing a drywall ceiling

I'm reading a book about FRAMING. It advises that "don't attach drywall directly to the underside of the ceiling joists, however, use wood or metal furring attached perpendicular to the joists and shimmed."
Would someone please tell me the reason behind it, why it is necessary or wise to use furring? Wouldn't it require more labor and costs and less headroom than having the drywall attached directly to the ceiling joists. I'm finishing my basement and about to install my drywall ceiling. Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 03-01-03, 05:32 AM
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I imagine that it would insure a flat ceiling. I don't know that I have ever seen this. I agree that it sounds expensive.
 
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Old 03-02-03, 07:32 AM
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Drywall Ceilings

Only time I've seen this used is in remodel jobs where the original ceiling joists were either of poor quality or where the spacing was too big to accomodate sheetrock hanging, (over 16"oc).
Other than that on new const, you just need to measure accurately on both sides of your sheet to ensure that your joists are true. Many times on factory made trusses the ceiling joists won't be true and you'll have to add in some sistered blocking to accomodate even length cuts on your sheetrock. This is particularly common in tract homes.
 
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Old 03-02-03, 09:22 AM
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Another question

Thanks chfite and awesomedell.
I decided against using furring as suggested by the book. I will install drywall directly to the ceiling joists. My house is 24 years old, the underside of some joists is higher or lower than the others. What is the best way to level them? For example, what do I add to a joist that is 1/4, 1/8 or 1/16 inch higher or lower than the adjacent joists. Thank you again.
 
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Old 03-02-03, 09:53 AM
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If you've got a joist or two that's more than 1/4" lower than the rest I'd shave either with a block plane or a belt sander. Anything less than that, I wouldn't even worry about, only one that will ever know it is the drywaller. I usually recommend folks on remodel jobs go with textured ceiling finish, which also helps hide such imperfections.
 
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Old 04-28-03, 09:48 AM
i_hammer
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I installed drywall directly to joists in a home less than 1 year old. It worked out great. However, furring strips would not be a bad idea if you ever decided to re-do or add projects that required additional wiring. With the drywall spaced an inch or so from the joists, threading wiring throught the area is much easier.
 
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Old 04-28-03, 08:46 PM
bungalow jeff
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The furring strips are more common in New England. I think it's a carry-over from the days of framing with full-sawn lumber.
 
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