building a wall in a garage


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Old 03-08-03, 11:19 AM
necie1
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building a wall in a garage

I have just bought a house that has a VERY big garage. It has the washer and dryer hookup in the garage as well. I want to build a wall that stretches approximately 25' creating an indoor utility room. I will have a door in the wall and understand an aircondition vent will need to be installed as welll as possible electrical work for lights. The electrical and aircondition issues are seperate issues. My question is mainly about how to build a wall this length. Can anyone give me some basic things I should think about before I decide weather or not I can do this myself?
 
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Old 03-08-03, 05:07 PM
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Hello necie1,
Welcome to the forum. Would need a bit more detail to give ya specific instruction on how to do this.
Framing an interior wall isn't too tough if you have some basic carpentry knowledge and the right tools. Pretty much any specialty tools you would need can be rented from a locally in most parts of the country. But if you're prety handy, and you've got the time & muscle, go for it.

Post back & I'll be happy to help ya with the detail.
 
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Old 03-08-03, 10:06 PM
necie1
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awesomedell,
thanks for the help. here's more info....

The wall I want to build will be 20'. It will run from one side of the garage to the other. As far as building this, this is what I know: I will need pressure treated lumber for a sill plate (somehow i have to bolt it into the concret floor of the garage - not sure how to do this, though) I will build a wall frame with 2x4's with legs about every 4'. It is an 8' ceiling (which I think is fairly standard). Somehow I will need to attach/bolt the sides of the frames into the block walls of the garage (again, not sure how to do this). I will then put drywall on one side of the frame. Then I will put insulation inside (not sure if I have to tack it up or if it just stays upright) before putting drywall on the other side. I know I will have to have a 2x4 as the top piece of the frame that I will attach to a beam in the roof (I have planned the wall along one of these beams). Also, I plan to put in a door which I plan to buy prehung.

Well, that's what I think I know. I've never done this so I could be missing some really important stuff!!! Like, do I have to caulk or mud the drywall where it buts to the garage wall and ceiling? I hope this all makes sense. Thanks again for any help.

Mike
 
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Old 03-08-03, 11:55 PM
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Ok Mike,

Probably a good idea to use the treated lumber for the base plate, never know what kind of liquid spill you could come up with in a garage.

Yes your wall has to be attached to concrete, they make several tools for shooting the base plate to the floor. I use a hilti, but there are several other brands. You can rent one for your project at a local rental yard. If I'm understanding your last post , you have concrete block walls, you can use the same tool to attach here as well.

I will build a wall frame with 2x4's with legs about every 4'.
I don't quite follow ya here,legs every 4' or so?
To install sheetrock on this wall you'll want to frame your wall on 24" centers at the max, but I'd really recommend going with a standard 16" o/c framing, this will make your insulating easier too, standard faced batts of insulation will stuff nicely in between studs set 16" o/c, with few to no staples to hold it in. You're on the right track here.
For your wall studs, buy pre-cuts, they're already cut at 92-5/8", so with your top & bottom plate it makes a standard 8 ft wall.

As to heating/cooling, if as I'm thinking, the garage isn't heated and you're wanting your new room to be climatized. This is easy enough, any heating/cooling supply store and sell you insulated flexable duct work and all the accessories you'll need to tie into the existing duct work.

As to lighting, how many lights are currently in the garage? If there's plenty and you have access to the attic space above them, might be able to simply move one or two over to the ceiling of your new room. Otherwise do a bit of reading in the electrical forum here or do a Google search for DIY Basic Wiring and I think you'll locate some good resources.

More questions or clarifications, nadda problem, post back & fire away.
 
 

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