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Finshing sheetrocking - Procedure


mcbaldylocks's Avatar
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03-12-03, 07:34 AM   #1  
mcbaldylocks
Finshing sheetrocking - Procedure

I am on the verge of completing the hanging of sheetrock in my basement. Of course after that I can enjoy the wonders of mudding and taping.
How many times should I mud, tape, and sand my joints before I can prime for painting?
I have heard that the proper way would be to mud and tape and sand three times before prepping the wall for painting.
Is this overkill?

 
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03-12-03, 04:53 PM   #2  
The routine is bed the tape in a layer of mud, mud over it, let dry, knock of the rough places with trowel, mud with a patial 10" knife to fill the indentations at the edges, let dry, knock off rough places or sand as needed, final mudding with full width 10" knife to smooth and feather. Let dry, sand smoooth and feather edges.

The objective is to get a smooth wall. Take your time, be sure to let it dry. Fill in as needed. any irregularities in the finished wall will show up in the paint.

You will become more proficient as you go.

Once finished, prime and paint. Enjoy!

Hope this helps.

 
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03-12-03, 06:47 PM   #3  
Chris,
Like mcbaldylocks, we will be finishing drywall soon too. My question: If we want a textured finish (i.e. 'orange peel') would we have to do the final third mud layer??
Thanks,
Sandie

 
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03-13-03, 07:46 AM   #4  
mcbaldylocks
stupid question...

Knock off??
What is it?

 
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03-13-03, 05:31 PM   #5  
mcbaldylocks -

Hello & welcome. Chris gave ya a prety good run down there. I routinely do finishes with two coats, but I've knifed several hundred tons of mud in my days. Most folks need 3 coats to get a smooth wall. When he said knock off, what he means is after a coat dries, run your blade over the mudded area and it will knock off the high spots. Post back if ya need more explaination.


onourown-

Welcome to you as well, you can fudge a little on having your wall perfectly smooth if your gonna to a spray & knockdown on it. But anything that you can plainly see prior to the knockdown coat will probably still be seen afterwards.

 
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03-14-03, 06:07 AM   #6  
mcbaldylocks
Sand or sponge

I have heard of two ways to take off the excess mud when it dries.
Sanding and removing the excess with a damp sponge. Are there pros or cons to either?
Should one or the other be done in between specific stages (sand between coats 1 and 2, but sponge the final coat. etc...)?

 
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03-15-03, 04:59 PM   #7  
I sand big areas (like new const. hs, addition, etc) for small patch jobs the damp sponge, but it still leaves lines that will need light sanding, dampening it with a sponge will cut down on the dust, which is always a plus.

Also I'd recommend a sanding screen instead of sand paper.

 
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03-16-03, 04:15 AM   #8  
mcbaldylocks
Thanks for all your help.

 
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03-17-03, 06:56 PM   #9  
Also I'd recommend a sanding screen instead of sand paper.

awesomedell,
Why sanding screen instead of sand paper? BTW, what size of the sanding screen or sand paper do you use for the first, second and last coats? Thank you.

 
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03-17-03, 08:43 PM   #10  
bungalow jeff
I like the sanding screen on a shop vac attachment. Move at a 45-degree angle to avoid lines.

 
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03-18-03, 08:56 PM   #11  
We use a 120 grid screen I believe it is, tell ya the truth, when we need it we just add it to the tape & mud order for the next job. I just check it's box on the form & fax it off.

Never added it up, but I've probably hung & finished somewhere over a million s/f of board over the yrs when I'm not laying floors. After slinging that much mud on walls, you learn not to leave much there to sand when you're floating out. When we do alot of sanding it's on a retro job, when we're fixing someone else's attempt to impersonate a drywaller.

I see alot of guys with those dustless sanders, I use an idiot stick, that's what I learned with, & it's cheap, and like I said, we don't do much sanding.

Screen is better because it doesn't clog up like sand paper will, specially if your mud isn't 100% dry.

 
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